Kat712
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I'm currently exploring different options I have for university courses, and I do really enjoy English literature, but I'm not really sure that doing an English degree will get me anywhere (like as a career). And I'm not even sure what you can do with one, apart from teaching or something along those lines. So is an English degree even worth it?
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randy orton
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No its not worth it
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username1801813
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if you want to be working at Starbucks, yeah.
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nah jk an English degree does provide you with plenty of transferable skills; strong communication, being analytical etc that are valuable.
obviously we're on tsr so there'll be strong anti-STEM sentiments but they're just butt-hurt that STEM isn't the be all and end all of academia

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MiraclePetals
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Depends on what career you want to enter
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Kat712
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(Original post by MiraclePetals)
Depends on what career you want to enter
I'm not even sure what I want to do, how do you even figure out what you want to do 😂
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Kat712
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(Original post by hamzakalinle)
if you want to be working at Starbucks, yeah.
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nah jk an English degree does provide you with plenty of transferable skills; strong communication, being analytical etc that are valuable.
obviously we're on tsr so there'll be strong anti-STEM sentiments but they're just butt-hurt that STEM isn't the be all and end all of academia


Yeah STEM subjects aren't really for me.
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MiraclePetals
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I decided on my career by looking through websites like jobsite and just seeing which jobs had potential in terms of money, opportunities, passion etc. Why not start with that I guess?

(Original post by Kat712)
I'm not even sure what I want to do, how do you even figure out what you want to do 😂
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BigMan Ting
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(Original post by Kat712)
I'm not even sure what I want to do, how do you even figure out what you want to do 😂
You'll have several careers through out your life time. It doesn't matter where you start, I've seen people with History degrees working in finance and English degrees as politicians or serving in the army. It doesn't matter where you go, your degree will be worth if you enjoyed it and believed it was worthwhile that you made the right decision to take that course.
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Kat712
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(Original post by MiraclePetals)
I decided on my career by looking through websites like jobsite and just seeing which jobs had potential in terms of money, opportunities, passion etc. Why not start with that I guess?
Ok I will, thank you
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gin20
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(Original post by Kat712)
I'm currently exploring different options I have for university courses, and I do really enjoy English literature, but I'm not really sure that doing an English degree will get me anywhere (like as a career). And I'm not even sure what you can do with one, apart from teaching or something along those lines. So is an English degree even worth it?
Hi I've just finished an English degree, and so can offer some of my experience of the degree itself and job-hunting afterwards.

What's your main reason for taking a degree?
1. To improve your employability
2. For the experience of university and the academic challenge.

If it's number 1 then I'm sure there are many more degrees that lend themselves directly to a career (medicine, physiotherapy, accountancy etc). However, I think that taking a degree just for employability is one of the worst things you can do in my opinion. You're going to leave uni with lots of loans to repay (over decades), and if you hated the 3 years then this will be hard to stomach.

I loved my degree, and university in general. I haven't found an English degree has closed any doors except for jobs in specifically scientific, engineering or digital industries (where I wouldn't have pursued a career anyway). Employability depends on many things - how prestigious the university is, the grade you get, if you've had work experience during university vacations, extracurriculars, performance at interview. Quite a few of the jobs I've looked at in communications/ PR/ research ask specifically for English graduates too!

I'm not saying it's the most employable degree, but I definitely think it was worth it for me - both because it made my university years enjoyable and because it's led me to look at careers that I feel are a good fit for me Feel free to PM if you have any specific worries or questions!
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Kat712
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(Original post by gin20)
Hi I've just finished an English degree, and so can offer some of my experience of the degree itself and job-hunting afterwards.

What's your main reason for taking a degree?
1. To improve your employability
2. For the experience of university and the academic challenge.

If it's number 1 then I'm sure there are many more degrees that lend themselves directly to a career (medicine, physiotherapy, accountancy etc). However, I think that taking a degree just for employability is one of the worst things you can do in my opinion. You're going to leave uni with lots of loans to repay (over decades), and if you hated the 3 years then this will be hard to stomach.

I loved my degree, and university in general. I haven't found an English degree has closed any doors except for jobs in specifically scientific, engineering or digital industries (where I wouldn't have pursued a career anyway). Employability depends on many things - how prestigious the university is, the grade you get, if you've had work experience during university vacations, extracurriculars, performance at interview. Quite a few of the jobs I've looked at in communications/ PR/ research ask specifically for English graduates too!

I'm not saying it's the most employable degree, but I definitely think it was worth it for me - both because it made my university years enjoyable and because it's led me to look at careers that I feel are a good fit for me Feel free to PM if you have any specific worries or questions!
My main reason would definitely be number two, and if you don't mind me asking, what careers has it led you to look at that you feel are a good fit for you? I just love English so much what was your favourite thing about studying English at university?
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gin20
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(Original post by Kat712)
My main reason would definitely be number two, and if you don't mind me asking, what careers has it led you to look at that you feel are a good fit for you? I just love English so much what was your favourite thing about studying English at university?
Yay i think it's great you know which subject you like, and your enthusiasm will get you far! I didn't really have much of a clue.

I'm actually doing a master's in English next year because i was lucky enough to get funding, but I've found some good jobs in publishing, journalism, PR, and the civil service that all require the sort of good written skills you get from an English degree. I might want to go into teaching or lecturing too. I think if you always choose to pursue the things you enjoy and are good at, you'll have a greater chance of job satisfaction later in life
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Kat712
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(Original post by gin20)
Yay i think it's great you know which subject you like, and your enthusiasm will get you far! I didn't really have much of a clue.

I'm actually doing a master's in English next year because i was lucky enough to get funding, but I've found some good jobs in publishing, journalism, PR, and the civil service that all require the sort of good written skills you get from an English degree. I might want to go into teaching or lecturing too. I think if you always choose to pursue the things you enjoy and are good at, you'll have a greater chance of job satisfaction later in life
That sounds amazing, congrats on being able to do a masters! And I really love the sound of some of the jobs you mentioned ahhh I just love English so much. What is it actually like at university? Do you get to pick the plays or novels you want to study?
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gin20
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(Original post by Kat712)
That sounds amazing, congrats on being able to do a masters! And I really love the sound of some of the jobs you mentioned ahhh I just love English so much. What is it actually like at university? Do you get to pick the plays or novels you want to study?
Every uni is a bit different (so look at the course outlines on their websites before applying) but you should get quite a lot of choice over which modules to take. There will probably be some things you have to study as well, like Shakespeare. Most English students will also do a dissertation in their final year - a really long essay on whatever books you like
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SufyaanShah
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why on earth do you need an english degree fam just go in there and be like *ahem*

"Oh why hello there, kind sir! It appears I am here as I would like to trade my expertise, time and maybe even labour if the work permits, in return for a certain amount of money. It is therefore in my request that you hire me, g'day to you sir!"

Brah watch what happens, the boss will be getting bare turned on by what you said and he/she will be bare begging you to cume I mean come to work for them.
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username2981082
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(Original post by SufyaanShah)
why on earth do you need an english degree fam just go in there and be like *ahem*

"Oh why hello there, kind sir! It appears I am here as I would like to trade my expertise, time and maybe even labour if the work permits, in return for a certain amount of money. It is therefore in my request that you hire me, g'day to you sir!"

Brah watch what happens, the boss will be getting bare turned on by what you said and he/she will be bare begging you to cume I mean come to work for them.
The level of your English undermines any judgements you make on a English degree.
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username2981082
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(Original post by Kat712)
I'm currently exploring different options I have for university courses, and I do really enjoy English literature, but I'm not really sure that doing an English degree will get me anywhere (like as a career). And I'm not even sure what you can do with one, apart from teaching or something along those lines. So is an English degree even worth it?
I am studying for a joint honours degree in English and History and don't listen to the idiots saying you'll be working in Starbucks after doing an English degree. They clearly haven't studied English Literature to be able to appreciate it as an academic discipline.

I plan to do a LLB senior status degree in Law after I graduate. I've done some shadowing at a Law Firm, read some interesting books to do with legal philosophy, and I completed a legal internship with a charity. When employers look at my CV they will pay more attention to all of this than the fact that I studied English Literature.

What you do as a career depends upon how much work you are willing to put in to to get that job.
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SufyaanShah
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(Original post by constantine2016)
The level of your English undermines any judgements you make on a English degree.
I beg your pardon, great citizen of the British society. Please do forgive me for not allowing myself to speak in a much more scrutinised English, I must say my good man, it is quite difficult to speak in the English language that was once respected across the globe! Yes indeed, the English language did indeed have the marvellous effect of charming practically anyone! Ah, I once recalled a moment where I was with my lovely wife, Mrs Katherine- wonderful woman I must add! Shame you do not find women these days! Anyhoo, I must be off now, g'day Sir! God bless the Queen!

Is that good enough for you, Shakespeare?
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Kat712
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(Original post by constantine2016)
I am studying for a joint honours degree in English and History and don't listen to the idiots saying you'll be working in Starbucks after doing an English degree. They clearly haven't studied English Literature to be able to appreciate it as an academic discipline.

I plan to do a LLB senior status degree in Law after I graduate. I've done some shadowing at a Law Firm, read some interesting books to do with legal philosophy, and I completed a legal internship with a charity. When employers look at my CV they will pay more attention to all of this than the fact that I studied English Literature.

What you do as a career depends upon how much work you are willing to put in to to get that job.
Thanks for the advice
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username2393237
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I think a lot of graduate jobs are open to any discipline. What do you think you'd like to do career wise?
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