S29 - Statement of Intent from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport] Watch

This discussion is closed.
cranbrook_aspie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Saoirse:3, has submitted the following Statement of Intent:-
S29 - Statement of Intent from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport


Secretary of State: Saoirse:3

This government believes it is more important than ever to respect, consider and promote the culture of the peoples of Britain: to retain our prominence on the world stage; and to ensure that there is public trust in the media to continue their great tradition of journalistic integrity and to hold all those with power to account. I hope that this statement will mark the beginning of our efforts to create yet more reasons to consider Britain a nation to be proud of.

Access to Culture and Sports
Culture should always be accessible to all, yet we see wealth become the deciding factor in ability to access culture. Despite the consistent rise in our national wealth, it’s reached the stage where following a sports team, going to the theatre or watching live music is reserved for those on above-average incomes.

In order to reverse this dangerous cultural threat, this department will prevent the re-sale of event tickets at inflated prices on the secondary market, either informally or with the aid of online ticket resale platforms. The secondary market has served to generally inflate the cost of tickets for popular events by allowing the initial allocation to be purchased by those with no intention of attending, who will later sell them on at a substantial profit. This practice has had a negative impact on responsible event organisers who have sought to make their tickets affordable yet have no means to prevent them eventually being bought for a multitude of the price initially charged, as well as facilitating those with somewhat murkier practices who have released tickets directly to resale platforms or encouraged purchases to do so, striking deals with resellers where they take a cut of the profits in the process – allowing them to advertise cheap tickets while in reality they are anything but. It’s time we bought this to an end.

Beyond this, the government will be seeking to implement necessary means to make sure culture and sports are affordable to all. Wherever possible, this will be in collaboration with those organising events such as encouraging the further use of initiatives such as the Premier League’s recent price cap on away tickets. Where collaboration proves impossible then other appropriate measures will be undertaken so long as it doesn’t threaten the financial stability of the organisations involved. Furthermore we will be legislating for those out of work due to age, disability or caring responsibilities to be guaranteed access to a fair ‘concessions’ price when attending these events. Britain’s culture is for all of its people, not just those fortunate enough to afford it.

Encouraging the culture of the future
We must recognise that culture is an ever-changing entity and that our young people both today and in the future will take it in directions which were once unimaginable. There are few better examples of this than “eSports” – a phenomenon which was virtually non-existent just a few years ago, but may soon take its place as one of the five leading sports in the world. Straddling the boundary between sport and culture, it serves to demonstrate the innovation we must continue to encourage.

In order to foster this creativity, the government will create a fund with an initial value of around £30m to which youth groups will be able to apply for support in cultural endeavours. This may be accessed by anyone from traditional pursuits such as sports clubs and theatre groups to those promoting lesser acknowledged games, fitness events and activities – be that eSports, crafting with recycled materials or, of course, Quidditch – and will be used to ensure even the most disadvantaged children can take part regardless of circumstances.

This will be funded by a 1% levy on the broadcasting revenues of professional football teams, which in recent years have grown massively with little benefit either to fans or to the nation as a whole. This will have a minimal impact on their funding situation while making a real contribution to areas which are not only crucial to promoting the creative freedoms and mental and physical well-being of our young people, but may provide real avenues for economic growth in the future.

Expected earnings
Premier League (Live): £2,767m
Premier League (Highlights): £68m
Premier League (Video Clips): £7m
FA Cup (Domestic): £70m
FA Cup (Overseas): £137m
Football League (Live): £150m (estimate) (includes EFL Cup)
Football League (Highlights): £2m
Scottish Professional Football League: £20m***
Scottish Cup (estimate): £1m
Scottish League Cup: £2m
Champions League*: £239m
Europa League**: £62m

Total: £3.525billion
1%: £35.25m

*Assuming 1 English club eliminated in semi-final, 1 eliminated in quarter-final, 1 eliminated in round of 16 and 1 eliminated in group stage; that three group-stage teams secure 3 wins, 2 draws and 1 loss each; that one group-stage team secures 2 wins, 2 draws and 2 losses; and that there are 32 drawn matches across group stage of the competition; all at current Euro-Sterling exchange rate.

**Assuming 1 English club eliminated in semi-final, 1 eliminated in quarter-final, and 1 eliminated in round of 16; that 1 Scottish club eliminated in round of 32; that four group-stage teams secure 3 wins, 2 draws and 1 loss each; that two teams win their group and that two are runners-up; and that there are 48 drawn matches across group stage of the competition; all at current Euro-Sterling exchange rate.

***Assumes £1m distributed to non-professional clubs


Restoring trust in the media

One of the emerging themes in the past 12 months on either side of the Atlantic has been an increasingly apparent public distrust in the established media. Many in the UK are angry at the reporting of Brexit, with both the BBC and print media accused of being one-sided or deliberately misleading. Meanwhile, the President of the United States has dismissed many traditional media sources as “Fake News”, at the exact time that increasing amounts of total untruths spread freely and widely on social media. The end result is that people are frustrated; more than ever, they feel like they don’t have the information needed to make important decisions, despite it theoretically being more accessible than ever with widespread access to the internet.

This incredibly dangerous state of affairs is worsened when newspapers deliberately print information they know to be untrue. Even when found to be guilty of this by independent regulators, there is far too much scope for them to remain largely unpunished and choose to simply continue as they were. The only solution is to increase the applicable penalty to ensure that people can trust what they read to be a reasonable interpretation of the facts at hand. As such, the Independent Press Standards Organisation will be mandated to ensure that in future, all corrections and apologies are given equal prominence to the full original story – up to and including full front pages where appropriate. Additionally, they will be given the power to ensure these statements are sincere and appropriate, as well as to fine newspapers up to the full amount of revenue gleaned from the offending issue where the incorrect story is deemed to be a primary contributor to their sales. It’s time to ensure that people once more can feel well-informed in an increasingly complex world.

However, we must also empower the print media and other forms of journalism to be brave and bold and ensure that the media provides a 'check' to the power of politics and other means. This government will create a means-tested fund to subsidise the cost of training in these fields, to which people from disadvantaged backgrounds will be able to apply for funding.

Social media and free speech
Our current laws regarding what can and cannot be published nearly uniformly predate the modern age of social media. They need to be re-considered in light of the way this new technology changes publishing and the spread of information. For instance, with more and more of the casual conversations that may once have taken place in the workplace or at the pub now moving online, they are on the record, accessible for others to see and legally situated in a very different position. It’s imperative that government policy is modernised to take this into account.

While our policy will be modernised, we will always ensure that free speech is protected, whether online or offline. This will be achieved by banning employers from taking disciplinary action against staff for expressing any opinion in a personal capacity, so long as that speech remains within the law. With the expectation of our society being that all those who are able to should be in work or education, allowing employers to limit speech threatens the rights of people to express their beliefs freely for fear of losing their job and indeed becoming reliant on state support, severely limiting the range of ‘acceptable’ opinions. While previously it would be rare for an employer to enforce such conditions, the rise of public debate on social media platforms – which as a Government we welcome as a valuable addition to our democracy – allows for far more control than is reasonable over an employee’s life away from the workplace. Additionally, we will amend the Communications Act 2003 such that it applies only to unsolicited communications, not to those someone has actively opted to receive – fulfilling the purpose of protecting people online, without limiting the rights of those who simply wish to share their opinions with others.

Secondly, we will reform libel law to sufficiently distinguish between traditional publishers, and individuals maintaining small-scale blogs or social media pages. We recognise that in some cases legal action on these grounds is entirely justified, with claims made over the internet having a real impact on an individual’s reputation as in the recent Monroe v Hopkins judgement. However, where these cases involve users with a minimal following, as was the case with many of the apparent offences against Lord McAlpine, it seems disproportionate that individuals can be treated in the same way as newspapers and that they should consider the legal implications not only of their own posts, but of promoting those of others. Therefore, a defence shall be introduced whereby an individual is not guilty if they reasonably expected the message to be read by fewer than 500 people. This would cover the vast majority of blogs and Twitter accounts, where the posting of gossip – while undoubtedly distasteful to some – is far more akin to a conversation between friends than publication in the traditional media, do not pose any real risk to the reputation of the victim and should not pose a serious legal threat to the perpetrator.

Finally, we will mandate ‘social media literacy’ to be added to the curriculum for pupils between the ages of 11 and 14 at schools in England, and encourage the devolved administrations to introduce a similar provision to their respective education systems. This will include teaching on the dangers of modern social media to teenagers, including ensuring accounts are secure, the issues of sharing sexual material, the implications for their privacy and the law regarding posts online, both as discussed earlier and in terms of other potential offences such as Contempt of Court, Sending a Menacing Electronic Communication, and those under the Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 1992.

Mr Deputy Speaker: Let our future be one where Britain’s great culture is protected and promoted; where we make an impact in every sphere on the world stage; and where all those proud to call our country home have their opinions respected and their rights defended.
0
Jammy Duel
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
TL;DR: bigger state, more restricted market, attacks on the wealthy.

It is fun how you claim to support freedom of speech straight after damaging it; who needs impress when IPSO will be the censor?
0
username2718212
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
God no.
0
04MR17
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
I have already expressed my liking towards this.

Aye from me.
0
RayApparently
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Aye.
0
TheDefiniteArticle
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Aye.
0
barnetlad
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
I thank the Secretary of State for their statement. One barrier to access which is cost related is the timing of sports fixtures and indeed in some cases theatre or entertainment productions. I was in Edinburgh at a comedy club two weeks ago and there were people who left before the final act to get the last bus home. In 2013 the FA Cup final ended after the last train back to Wigan. Could the Government act to reduce such instances? Access should not just be for those with a car, they should be able to use public transport.
0
username2585877
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
Aye
0
Quamquam123
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
I commend the Government for a very well written statement of intent. I have to say though, I'm a little disappointed that there's nothing in here about enusring equal pay for both genders in the media.
0
username1524603
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
This SoI summarises the politics of jealousy.
0
Jammy Duel
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
This SoI summarises the politics of jealousy.
The only problem is that it isn't high culture being subsidised by the jealousy, it's the **** you watch when pissed at the pub.
0
cranbrook_aspie
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#12
The non-legislative parts of this statement of intent have passed.
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (119)
17.66%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (71)
10.53%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (119)
17.66%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (100)
14.84%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (65)
9.64%
How can I be the best version of myself? (200)
29.67%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed