I want to be a Physician associate!! Watch

Emiliexx
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I'm looking at doing a biomedical degree or a healthcare science degree in order to become a physician associate. After doing a biomedical or healthcare science degree I will need to do a postgraduate qualification n physcian associates!

I need help with choosing work experience for these degrees. Has anyone any ideas how I need to go about getting work experience for my chosen degrees and what sort of work experience I should look for? I've done no work experience in the NHS but have had 4 weeks work experience in a vets and I have worked in a vets for 2 years.
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j_vicente
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(Original post by Emiliexx)
I'm looking at doing a biomedical degree or a healthcare science degree in order to become a physician associate. After doing a biomedical or healthcare science degree I will need to do a postgraduate qualification n physcian associates!

I need help with choosing work experience for these degrees. Has anyone any ideas how I need to go about getting work experience for my chosen degrees and what sort of work experience I should look for? I've done no work experience in the NHS but have had 4 weeks work experience in a vets and I have worked in a vets for 2 years.
Hey. Im not sure about the biomed degree but my experience before I applied for PA was 99% volunteering. I was a volunteer in the hospital in my city for the whole 3 years during my bachelors and even tho it took some hard work to make time to do volunteer work, definitely worth it. I was also a volunteer abroad working in Hospitals in Uganda and that was a project I discovered in my Uni at the time, we went there during the summer. Many Unis have these kind of developing projects, maybe you can look for something like that.
Good luck in your path to become a PA!
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Vanny17
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(Original post by Emiliexx)
I'm looking at doing a biomedical degree or a healthcare science degree in order to become a physician associate. After doing a biomedical or healthcare science degree I will need to do a postgraduate qualification n physcian associates!

I need help with choosing work experience for these degrees. Has anyone any ideas how I need to go about getting work experience for my chosen degrees and what sort of work experience I should look for? I've done no work experience in the NHS but have had 4 weeks work experience in a vets and I have worked in a vets for 2 years.
Here's exactly what I posted not too long ago, with some addition.

I am a Biomedical Science graduate, I would not advise you do Biomed unless you want to go back to University for further study, as you won't start at Band 5 in the NHS, but rather as a Medical Laboratory Assistant (MLA). The pay is not good at all. If you still decide to go for Biomedical Science, then start applying for jobs in year 2 and be certified of a job before starting year 3. Gain plenty of laboratory experience as it will be required.

You can do a Bsc in Biomedical Science, get a 2.1 or first and apply for a 2 years post graduate diploma in Nursing or go for Bsc Nursing. I would not advise anyone or OP to do a Physician Associate degree. There are hardly any job vacancies for it and it is not very recognised. If we were in the US, I would advise one to go for it, however not in the UK. Op, rather than Physician Associate, I would advise you go for Allied Health professional jobs, particularly nursing as the pay is good, there are always jobs, you can do over time to earn more, good career progression, and you are more likely to get a job here in the UK and around the World, with Physician Associate not so much. With Physiotherapy, there are not many jobs as well and you will require more study to earn more.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Vanny17)
Here's exactly what I posted not too long ago, with some addition.

I am a Biomedical Science graduate, I would not advise you do Biomed unless you want to go back to University for further study, as you won't start at Band 5 in the NHS, but rather as a Medical Laboratory Assistant (MLA). The pay is not good at all. If you still decide to go for Biomedical Science, then start applying for jobs in year 2 and be certified of a job before starting year 3. Gain plenty of laboratory experience as it will be required.

You can do a Bsc in Biomedical Science, get a 2.1 or first and apply for a 2 years post graduate diploma in Nursing or go for Bsc Nursing. I would not advise anyone or OP to do a Physician Associate degree. There are hardly any job vacancies for it and it is not very recognised. If we were in the US, I would advise one to go for it, however not in the UK. Op, rather than Physician Associate, I would advise you go for Allied Health professional jobs, particularly nursing as the pay is good, there are always jobs, you can do over time to earn more, good career progression, and you are more likely to get a job here in the UK and around the World, with Physician Associate not so much. With Physiotherapy, there are not many jobs as well and you will require more study to earn more.
There's a shed load of PA jobs, it's an up and coming profession being newly integrated. It was only 2.5 years ago that they began setting up the courses.

I would not recommend BSc Healthcare Science purely on that fact that it is a course to directly become a Biomedical Scientist. Although there is nothing stopping you progressing from it to PA, I strongly see it as a waste of a space.
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Vanny17
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
There's a shed load of PA jobs, it's an up and coming profession being newly integrated. It was only 2.5 years ago that they began setting up the courses.

I would not recommend BSc Healthcare Science purely on that fact that it is a course to directly become a Biomedical Scientist. Although there is nothing stopping you progressing from it to PA, I strongly see it as a waste of a space.
There isn't a shed load of PA jobs available. It is a dead-end career. A basic NHS search will show this. Most of the PA jobs require 2 to 5 years post qualification experience as well. All the best getting this experience due to the extreme competition. PA is good on paper, not in practice. You need to have done a strong scientific Bsc degree such as a Life science or other health related subject e.g. Biomedical science, biology, biochemistry, biomedical sciences, medical sciences, medical engineering, nursing, Operating Department Practice, Paramedic Pharmacy or Physiology before applying for PA, because it IS a post graduate/ masters qualification.
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username2754056
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(Original post by Emiliexx)
I'm looking at doing a biomedical degree or a healthcare science degree in order to become a physician associate. After doing a biomedical or healthcare science degree I will need to do a postgraduate qualification n physcian associates!

I need help with choosing work experience for these degrees. Has anyone any ideas how I need to go about getting work experience for my chosen degrees and what sort of work experience I should look for? I've done no work experience in the NHS but have had 4 weeks work experience in a vets and I have worked in a vets for 2 years.
From the responses I have seen on this post so far there are some things I would agree with, others not so much. Aspects such as career progression, pay etc are important of course. But coming from my own experience you have to figure out what you want in a job. Nearly 75% of your waking life will be spent in employment, if you're lucky. So its incredibly important that you figure out what you want.

I applied for the physician associate job because I wanted to do medicine but I didn't want the responsibility of a doctor. No I won't ever be a completely independent practitioner but that doesn't matter to me. I also knew that currently even as a senior I am unlikely to earn more than 40k per year, but for me that's fine. As long as I have enough money to settle down with my girlfriend I don't care. But these are my parameters for a career. You have to figure out yours.

Also if you even pay the slightest bit of attention to the political situation of the NHS you will see that PAs are only going to grow and they aren't going anywhere. DoH has already confirmed over £2 million in HEE funding for training and already it is predicted that over 1000 PAs will be graduating per year after 2020. So don't worry about the future of the profession.

On the other hand you will have to think about whether you can handle some of the challenges of training in a new profession. How will you react to people not knowing what you are, to some doctors being passively aggressive to your profession on placement. Although rare, these are all things for you to consider as well.
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Vanny17
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(Original post by Ilir1989)
What makes you think it's a dead end career? Also there seems to be a misunderstanding about the number of PA jobs available because:

1. Most PA jobs are set up between students and their placement supervisors, so a fair amount never go on NHS jobs in the first place.
2. In the last census 131/150 PAs were employed in primary or secondary care. That is a very high percentage for a profession that is really...only 3 years old. This will undoubtedly increase and I look forward to seeing this year's census.
3. There are already a large amount of jobs in NHS Jobs alone and this isn't counting the huge number of jobs that will come up in the north once the first cohorts of students graduate from the 7 universities up there.
The inability to prescribe makes the PA job disadvantageous though. Nurses are allowed to prescribe although narrowly, however, PAs are not. PAs will always need a doctor to prescribe medicines.
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username2754056
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(Original post by Vanny17)
The inability to prescribe makes the PA job disadvantageous though. Nurses are allowed to prescribe although narrowly, however, PAs are not. PAs will always need a doctor to prescribe medicines.
Trust feedback has been that it isn't that disruptive. Doctors are frustrated by our inability to prescribe because they see that we have the knowledge to, yet are hindered by lack of regulation. We can choose which medications to give, write them up etc we just need the doctor to sign and review (review less and less as the trust grows in the doctor-PA relationship).

Prescribing rights will come with regulation, which has already been proposed in parliament. PAs are taught safe prescribing and have a list of core medications. It will come with regulation.
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Vanny17
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(Original post by Ilir1989)
Trust feedback has been that it isn't that disruptive. Doctors are frustrated by our inability to prescribe because they see that we have the knowledge to, yet are hindered by lack of regulation. We can choose which medications to give, write them up etc we just need the doctor to sign and review (review less and less as the trust grows in the doctor-PA relationship).

Prescribing rights will come with regulation, which has already been proposed in parliament. PAs are taught safe prescribing and have a list of core medications. It will come with regulation.
I agree it will come with regulation, but it is not regulated now. On the plus side, I quite like the PA job being a post graduate qualification, how they can change specialities and how many other Universities across the country have started the PA course, however, I feel the prescribing right puts the course down.
Can you answer these questions below if you don't mind me asking.
How did you find the PA course?
How were the exams and assignments like?
What degree did you do prior to starting the PA course?
Can I also send you a PM?, I would like to know more about the course, thanks.
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username2754056
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(Original post by Vanny17)
I agree it will come with regulation, but it is not regulated now. On the plus side, I quite like the PA job being a post graduate qualification, how they can change specialities and how many other Universities across the country have started the PA course, however, I feel the prescribing right puts the course down.
Can you answer these questions below if you don't mind me asking.
How did you find the PA course?
How were the exams and assignments like?
What degree did you do prior to starting the PA course?
Can I also send you a PM?, I would like to know more about the course, thanks.
I found out from a friend of mine who knew a PA in London.

I am still doing it, am halfway through the first year. It is good. Exciting to learn medicine. Dynamic and exciting especially on placement. But intense. Very intense. Theory and also placement as you have to dive in.

Assignments and exams vary from course to course. Each course has to abide by a carriculum but how they choose to achieve this is up to them. This is an area you would have to play close attention to. Ask other students at that uni about the course because they vary a lot in delivery methods. In mine, assignments are a mixture of OSCEs and case study assignments. MCQ exams are practice only.

I did Biomedical Science 6 years ago. Trust me when I say it will help you if you have experience of full time employment prior to the course.

Yes feel free to PM me.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Vanny17)
There isn't a shed load of PA jobs available. It is a dead-end career. A basic NHS search will show this. Most of the PA jobs require 2 to 5 years post qualification experience as well. All the best getting this experience due to the extreme competition. PA is good on paper, not in practice. You need to have done a strong scientific Bsc degree such as a Life science or other health related subject e.g. Biomedical science, biology, biochemistry, biomedical sciences, medical sciences, medical engineering, nursing, Operating Department Practice, Paramedic Pharmacy or Physiology before applying for PA, because it IS a post graduate/ masters qualification.
Sounds like you get rejected for the course to me as nothing you've said is true.
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Vanny17
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Sounds like you get rejected for the course to me as nothing you've said is true.
You are seriously joking, right? And it's got* not get* You just made a false accusation of me I did not even know there was a course as a Physician Associate. Stop your accusations, you are not showing yourself in a positive light.
I am now more knowledgeable of the PA job prospects role after @IIir1989 reply, which was polite unlike yours.
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Vanny17
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(Original post by Ilir1989)
I found out from a friend of mine who knew a PA in London.

I am still doing it, am halfway through the first year. It is good. Exciting to learn medicine. Dynamic and exciting especially on placement. But intense. Very intense. Theory and also placement as you have to dive in.

Assignments and exams vary from course to course. Each course has to abide by a carriculum but how they choose to achieve this is up to them. This is an area you would have to play close attention to. Ask other students at that uni about the course because they vary a lot in delivery methods. In mine, assignments are a mixture of OSCEs and case study assignments. MCQ exams are practice only.

I did Biomedical Science 6 years ago. Trust me when I say it will help you if you have experience of full time employment prior to the course.

Yes feel free to PM me.
Wow, well done for getting this far! Yes, I would imagine it to be intense due to all that knowledge being crammed into 2 years. Thanks, will send you a PM!
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RosieGirl
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(Original post by Vanny17)
There isn't a shed load of PA jobs available. It is a dead-end career. A basic NHS search will show this. Most of the PA jobs require 2 to 5 years post qualification experience as well. All the best getting this experience due to the extreme competition. PA is good on paper, not in practice. You need to have done a strong scientific Bsc degree such as a Life science or other health related subject e.g. Biomedical science, biology, biochemistry, biomedical sciences, medical sciences, medical engineering, nursing, Operating Department Practice, Paramedic Pharmacy or Physiology before applying for PA, because it IS a post graduate/ masters qualification.
Where have you got such a negative view of PA from?
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RosieGirl
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Someone mentioned earlier that PAs won't make more than 40k - is this true?
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username2754056
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(Original post by RosieGirl)
Someone mentioned earlier that PAs won't make more than 40k - is this true?
Yes at the moment this is the case. As a new profession we really only progress to band 8. This is to be expected because there aren't really any PA managers yet etc.

Naturally as PAs are more embedded into the system more senior roles will come up because they will need people to manage PAs in a hospital as a whole, so this sill drive up top salaries.

But if you're looking to make something like £70+ in the next 10 years, this profession isn't for you.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Vanny17)
You are seriously joking, right? And it's got* not get* You just made a false accusation of me I did not even know there was a course as a Physician Associate. Stop your accusations, you are not showing yourself in a positive light.
I am now more knowledgeable of the PA job prospects role after @IIir1989 reply, which was polite unlike yours.
Obviously it's got, well done.

You've posted on various topics slating the PA position, you clearly have/had an agenda on it otherwise you wouldn't have put time into posting on more than 1 topics. You're the worst kind of poster, those that attempt to impose their opinion onto others. Lead people to reach their own opinion, don't force your own.
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Vanny17
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
Obviously it's got, well done.

You've posted on various topics slating the PA position, you clearly have/had an agenda on it otherwise you wouldn't have put time into posting on more than 1 topics. You're the worst kind of poster, those that attempt to impose their opinion onto others. Lead people to reach their own opinion, don't force your own.
And it took you 2 days to reply back. Well done! I bet you have searched my post history as well. Congratulations. :^_^: I was not slating the PA profession, was mainly stating my opinion based on my research on NHS jobs listing few PA jobs. And no, I do not have an agenda. I most certainly won't gain anything by having an 'agenda'. I don't have time for such absurdities. A PA student corrected me and as you can see I didn't post anymore.This is getting irksome for my liking, please don't quote me again. Thanks.
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ssklry
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Hi @RosieGirl,Just a quick note, I am unsure what stage of PA career progression IIir1989 is, and all the best to him/ her, however I am currently a PA and I and making almost 50k. If you wish to only practice as a PA then you will probably not make much over 50k, you can do part time in GP or lecture at a university (with further qualification of course) and make more. From previous comment by IIir1989, it is true if you are looking to make over 70k, then perhaps PA is not the correct career path
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username2754056
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(Original post by ssklry)
Hi @RosieGirl,Just in a quick note, I am unsure what stage of PA career progression IIir1989 is, and all the best to him/ her, however I am currently a PA and I and making almost 50k. If you wish to only practice as a PA then you will probably not make much over 50k, you can do part time in GP or lecture at a university (with further qualification of course) and make more. From previous comment by IIir1989, it is true if you are looking to make over 70k, then perhaps PA is not the correct career path
What stage I am in my career has no bearing on the advice I give. You may be on 50k but you are in the vast minority. Average salary at the moment is 35k. Highest average is 48k and that is for the most experienced. Given that it takes 10 years minimum for a profession to properly imbed itself, there will be a lot of time before posts and pay bandings over 8a become standard. I am giving Rosie clear information taken from industry wide statistics. This is the correct way to give someone information for a career choice. To use your own personal experience instead is highly irresponsible.

Rosie please see this site for more info https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...cian-associate

You can also Google for the physician associate 2016 census for information on where PAs are currently working and what they are doing. The 2017 one will be out this month :-)
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