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Will a reference from a doctor increase one's chances of getting into Med School ? Watch

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    I recently met a practicing Orthopedic Surgeon who gave consent to be my referee after some interesting medicine related conversations. I had previously asked my English teacher to do the same for me as other teachers were too busy. Which is the better option?
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    For your UCAS reference it's usually your sixth form/college that writes and provides your reference for you as they know you and teach you - I don't really understand how a reference from a surgeon could form a part of your application, but please correct me if I'm misled.
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    No.

    Your UCAS application requires an academic reference from your school. There is nowhere you can add anything else to it.

    And if that surgeon (who should know better) tries to influence a University's decision in any way, any 'reference' will a) be put straight in the bin, and b) reflect badly on you.

    Thankfully, these days the old-boys network is long-dead. This sort of 'he's just the right sort' handshake has no place in modern University admissions.
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    (Original post by SwapB)
    I recently met a practicing Orthopedic Surgeon who gave consent to be my referee after some interesting medicine related conversations. I had previously asked my English teacher to do the same for me as other teachers were too busy. Which is the better option?
    Someone you recently met won't be able to give half as good a reference as someone who a) knows you and b) has done references for a long time.

    And as others have said, getting a reference from a doctor will absolutely not give you a boost. Can't think of any reason why it would. Just because you know a surgeon doesn't make you a better applicant. For many unis they don't look at the references until quite late in the application process so they wouldn't know about it any way.
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    Thanks everyone for those precious pieces of advice!

    I too thought the same actually.... the teacher is the BEST option. But when you have a dilemma you ask TSR right?
    Thanks again guys.

    By the way, if I land an interview should I bring a Letter of Recommendation or anything of that sort from this person in order to boost my chances of getting in?
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    (Original post by SwapB)
    Thanks everyone for those precious pieces of advice!

    I too thought the same actually.... the teacher is the BEST option. But when you have a dilemma you ask TSR right?
    Thanks again guys.

    By the way, if I land an interview should I bring a Letter of Recommendation or anything of that sort from this person in order to boost my chances of getting in?
    No, don't do that. Unis don't take any of that stuff into account. The best thing to do is to do your best at the interview. Good luck with your application!
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    (Original post by hoafanuk)
    No, don't do that. Unis don't take any of that stuff into account. The best thing to do is to do your best at the interview. Good luck with your application!
    if anything it may count AGAINST you as a probity issue . and if the Medical school wanted to be really vindictive as an FtP issue for the writer.

    This is the developed World not the USA.
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    (Original post by SwapB)
    Thanks everyone for those precious pieces of advice!

    I too thought the same actually.... the teacher is the BEST option. But when you have a dilemma you ask TSR right?
    Thanks again guys.

    By the way, if I land an interview should I bring a Letter of Recommendation or anything of that sort from this person in order to boost my chances of getting in?
    I'm not sure why you're so keen to involve this person. Why would it boost your chances? What can they possibly say that would make the medical school go "oh wow we need this person because this random surgeon said so"? They want to hear it from YOU. Remember that when you're involved in medicine, almost everyone you know is a doctor. Suddenly it's not such a special title! If it was even remotely worth doing, everyone would be doing it because every applicant knows someone, and every applicant is desperate.

    Forget this letter of recommendation. It's not going to give you a boost in any way at any stage of the process. And please don't write about this doctor in your personal statement. Or about the letter of recommendation.


    Just make yourself shine and they won't need to hear that you're shiny from someone else.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    if anything it may count AGAINST you as a probity issue . and if the Medical school wanted to be really vindictive as an FtP issue for the writer.

    This is the developed World not the USA.
    I doubt it would ever go that far. It's not dishonest or immoral to get a letter of recommendation! It's just not helpful and not going to work. And FtP is a serious thing. Writing a letter saying nice things about a person who wants to do your job is not going to make any question whether you're a safe doctor!

    I imagine it would just be embarrassing and wouldn't leave a good impression for the candidate. The university might have a bit of a giggle and that would be that.
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    (Original post by SwapB)
    I recently met a practicing Orthopedic Surgeon who gave consent to be my referee after some interesting medicine related conversations. I had previously asked my English teacher to do the same for me as other teachers were too busy. Which is the better option?
    If you wish to use this doctor is any way, try to get the opportunity to work-shadow. him.

    Although arguably calling in favours from pals to obtain work experience is no better than the way in which you wished to use him to support your application as it helps the well connected, medical schools do not view it in the same way.

    Then, if you get some work experience in that way, write in your PS or discuss in your interview the insight you have gained from the work experience, not the mere fact you were offered it.
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    I doubt it would ever go that far. It's not dishonest or immoral to get a letter of recommendation! It's just not helpful and not going to work. And FtP is a serious thing. Writing a letter saying nice things about a person who wants to do your job is not going to make any question whether you're a safe doctor!

    I imagine it would just be embarrassing and wouldn't leave a good impression for the candidate. The university might have a bit of a giggle and that would be that.
    remember we are in a situation with probity/ bribery / fraud where you have to declare sweeties, pens and post-its ...
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    remember we are in a situation with probity/ bribery / fraud where you have to declare sweeties, pens and post-its ...
    At work yes, but not as a student applying to a university.

    The doctor is not acting as a representative of his organisation in writing a letter about a kid he met. And there is no money or underhandedness happening. He can do what he likes!

    There is no dishonesty.
    There is no bribary.
    There is no fraud!??!?!?

    A kid thinks a letter from a doctor will make him look good. It won't. The doctor isn't going to get in trouble writing a nice letter about someone he met. The applicant isn't going to get in trouble for getting someone to write down why they think he would be a good doctor.

    Don't be daft :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    At work yes, but not as a student applying to a university.

    The doctor is not acting as a representative of his organisation in writing a letter about a kid he met. And there is no money or underhandedness happening. He can do what he likes!

    There is no dishonesty.
    There is no bribary.
    There is no fraud!??!?!?

    A kid thinks a letter from a doctor will make him look good. It won't. The doctor isn't going to get in trouble writing a nice letter about someone he met. The applicant isn't going to get in trouble for getting someone to write down why they think he would be a good doctor.

    Don't be daft :rolleyes:
    (I love you and your posting. Don't tell the others, but you're my favourite...)
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    (I love you and your posting. Don't tell the others, but you're my favourite...)
    :lol: :shh:

    prsom
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    if anything it may count AGAINST you as a probity issue . and if the Medical school wanted to be really vindictive as an FtP issue for the writer.

    This is the developed World not the USA.
    Seriously, what is wrong with a doctor writing a reference for someone...?

    To OP, in this scenario, I doubt it would help - as others have said, for UCAS applications, the school writes the reference. But some people's responses in this thread are overreacting quite a lot.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    if anything it may count AGAINST you as a probity issue . and if the Medical school wanted to be really vindictive as an FtP issue for the writer.

    This is the developed World not the USA.
    Overreacting, much?

    A letter from a surgeon is not going to help, for all the reasons already explained above. But at the same time it is NOT a probity issue, nor is it FtP for the referee.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    No.

    Your UCAS application requires an academic reference from your school. There is nowhere you can add anything else to it.

    And if that surgeon (who should know better) tries to influence a University's decision in any way, any 'reference' will a) be put straight in the bin, and b) reflect badly on you.

    Thankfully, these days the old-boys network is long-dead. This sort of 'he's just the right sort' handshake has no place in modern University admissions.
    The old boy's network worked on the basis of medical schools being more likely to make an offer if the applicant's dad had gone to medical school with the Dean or if the applicant was likely to be a great addition to the medics 1st XV. And so on. Which is rather different to what the OP is asking about here.

    That said, the OP should still try his best to get a reference from his school as that's what's usually done and they'll know him the best.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    remember we are in a situation with probity/ bribery / fraud where you have to declare sweeties, pens and post-its ...
    Except references are a required part of applying for FT, ST/CT and I suspect consultant applications....
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    Except references are a required part of applying for FT, ST/CT and I suspect consultant applications....
    reference from line managers is rather difference than the use of 'letters of recommendation' or ' letters of introduction ' wink wink nudge nudge funny handshake
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    reference from line managers is rather difference than the use of 'letters of recommendation' or ' letters of introduction ' wink wink nudge nudge funny handshake
    For FY there was no requirement on their role iirc. For CT one had to be most recent clinical supervisor so I guess equivalent of line manager, but not on the second.

    I just don't interpret it in the same way as you do. References are a normal part of medicine and this consultant probably writes 5+ per year. In reality I think it will just come across as bizarre in this case, but not unprofessional or criminal!
 
 
 
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