alicewonderland2
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hey, I'm thinking of applying to Lancaster university to do the BSc Psychology course. I have looked at all the resources on the University website and the like, but would love to hear about people who have studied or are studying Psychology at the moment.

I would also like any info on the nightlife, accommodation and just general stuff about it that I wouldn't be able to find online.

Also, would it be possible to do a placement year in-between years 2 and 3? I know that I couldn't find anything on the website saying that you could, but I love the location but a placement year is almost certainly part of my criteria
0
reply
FreyLancaster
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
Hi I study Psychology at Lancaster- I will be going into my third year in September!

About the nightlife- I am from Manchester so I too was a bit apprehensive about the nightlife in Lancaster, thinking that it wouldn't really be what i'm used to, having come from a big city. However, I have actually really loved the nightlife. There's a club called the Sugarhouse, which is run by the students union (you could find them on facebook if you wanted to have a look). The drinks are cheap and they often give you free entry if you come as part of a society (i.e. part of the netball team or the psychology society of whatever)). The Sugarhouse is also only open to Lancaster students, which is good because you see all your friends from your course/ your college etc, and meet new people from the university too (saying this you can bring guests (i.e. friends from home), in with you if you want you just need to check them in using your student ID). There's also another club called Dalton rooms (again, check them out on facebook), which is really good. Again, they always have drinks and entry offers on so its pretty cheap. Other than that there's lots of independent bars in the city center, from cocktail bars to wine bars and shisha bars- there are loads!

Also on campus every college has there own bar so many students like to enjoy the nightlife on campus as well.In terms of accommodation, Lancaster's accommodation is really very good! It ranges from standard (a medium sized room with a sink and mirror) to superior en-suite (a large room with an en-suite bathroom). There is also variation in terms of the layout; most flats are eight people to a shared kitchen, whereas other flats house slightly more/ less people. Some also have a shared living space- these are called town houses. When applying for accommodation, Lancaster is slightly different to other universities, as you apply to a college. If you look online you'll find some information about each of the colleges and their bar/ social space (as I mentioned before each college has their own social space). It will say online that each college is known for different things, e.g. Fylde is known as the sporting college, and Lonsdale is often known as the party college. In reality, each college have sports teams and social events etc. so there isn't a huge amount of difference between the colleges. I would suggest when choosing accommodation to look at what each college is known for, and see which college you like the sound of. Then consider which type of accommodation you'd like and whereabouts on campus you'd want to live and go from there.

In terms of doing a placement year, that's certainly possible and a lot of students do it. I have a friend who is also studying psychology and is taking a placement year between years 2 and 3- so it's definitely doable. The psychology careers team and the general university careers team are both fantastic, so there's definitely lots of support in place should you need help finding a placement that suits you or applying for placements. There is also lots of opportunity to study abroad or to volunteer abroad at one of our partner institutions over the summer. The psychology department at Lancaster has been fantastic for me. I've learnt a huge range of skills from experimental design to data analysis and really interesting theories. The best part about it is that you're literally learning from the best people in the field.

I have had some incredible opportunities from studying at Lancaster and have had the privilege to meet some amazing people- for example, I met with professor Alan Baddeley (famous for the working memory model). I have no doubt that you'll love Lancaster, should you choose to come here.

Good luck with your application process, Let me know if you have any more questions
0
reply
Cubone-r
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by alicewonderland2)
Hey, I'm thinking of applying to Lancaster university to do the BSc Psychology course. I have looked at all the resources on the University website and the like, but would love to hear about people who have studied or are studying Psychology at the moment.

I would also like any info on the nightlife, accommodation and just general stuff about it that I wouldn't be able to find online.

Also, would it be possible to do a placement year in-between years 2 and 3? I know that I couldn't find anything on the website saying that you could, but I love the location but a placement year is almost certainly part of my criteria
Psychology graduate from the University of Glasgow here (not Lancaster sadly). I can tell you about psychology degrees in general however.

Psychology is an excellent degree subject that can lead to a wide variety of careers - there really is something for everyone within the degree and future job opportunities.

As for the course content, there is a lot to learn and read - however, it is rewarding and particularly interesting. However, there will be some areas of psychology that will bore you to death either because the content is so dry or the lecturer is not very good at teaching.

You need to have top notch critical thinking skills and essay writing skills - these are essential for being successful in a psychology degree. You also need to be a good researcher as you will have to read around your subject areas, finding your own research articles and fleshing out the lecture guidance.

As for placements, I did a summer research exchange at the University of Mannheim in Germany for three months where I worked as a research assistant. You should also be able apply for a year abroad - where you study at an overseas university for a year.

Personally, I am now working on my research master's degree - many of my fellow graduates have gone on to research training, clinical training, teaching, totally unrelated graduate jobs, social work, etc... so there's a good mix.

I would highly recommend the degree course.
2
reply
alicewonderland2
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Cubone-r)
Psychology graduate from the University of Glasgow here (not Lancaster sadly). I can tell you about psychology degrees in general however.

Psychology is an excellent degree subject that can lead to a wide variety of careers - there really is something for everyone within the degree and future job opportunities.

As for the course content, there is a lot to learn and read - however, it is rewarding and particularly interesting. However, there will be some areas of psychology that will bore you to death either because the content is so dry or the lecturer is not very good at teaching.

You need to have top notch critical thinking skills and essay writing skills - these are essential for being successful in a psychology degree. You also need to be a good researcher as you will have to read around your subject areas, finding your own research articles and fleshing out the lecture guidance.

As for placements, I did a summer research exchange at the University of Mannheim in Germany for three months where I worked as a research assistant. You should also be able apply for a year abroad - where you study at an overseas university for a year.

Personally, I am now working on my research master's degree - many of my fellow graduates have gone on to research training, clinical training, teaching, totally unrelated graduate jobs, social work, etc... so there's a good mix.

I would highly recommend the degree course.
Thanks for the info, i'm 100% set on doing a psychology degree, and i think i want to branch into clinical practice
0
reply
Conlak
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
alice if you want to do clinical you are gonna have to do an extra 5 years once your degree is over considering you need to become a doctor to be able to prescribe/diagnose
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Which party will you be voting for in the General Election?

Conservatives (48)
18.75%
Labour (105)
41.02%
Liberal Democrats (52)
20.31%
Green Party (16)
6.25%
Brexit Party (7)
2.73%
Independent Group for Change (Change UK) (0)
0%
SNP (4)
1.56%
Plaid Cymru (5)
1.95%
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) (0)
0%
Sinn Fein (0)
0%
SDLP (0)
0%
Ulster Unionist (0)
0%
UKIP (2)
0.78%
Other (2)
0.78%
None (15)
5.86%

Watched Threads

View All