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    I'm considering applying for a GEM course but I don't know if I'm being unrealistic even to think of it. I have pretty severe dyspraxia. I've been interested in medicine since I was a child, but when I was choosing GCSEs I reluctantly concluded that it probably wasn't going to be viable for me given my motor coordination problems and other issues. I did ask my occupational therapist if she thought it would be possible for me and she said that she didn't want to upset me, but if she walked into her local surgery for a blood test and it was me doing it she'd be worried the needle would end up in her nose instead of in her arm. So I dropped the idea without investigating it further. I wish I'd at least tried to get some work experience.

    Academically I did well (9A*s at GCSE, five As and a B at A-Level - this was before the A* at A-Level got introduced). I did my undergrad in history at Cambridge, followed by a PhD. I'm now 30 years old and working as a postdoc, but the niggling interest in medicine is still there. In the past I worked part-time as a HCA in a dementia ward, and feedback from nursing staff was that while I was slower than average at patient care (helping people to dress and go to the toilet, etc.), I was good at building relationships and communicating clearly with patients who were very distressed and whose behaviour could be challenging. Based on that I applied for a support worker job in a psychiatric unit, which I loved. I'm really interested in psychiatry and neurology. But I know that to get to that stage I'd have to demonstrate competency in lots of practical tasks and I don't want to waste time studying for UKCAT if I'm chasing something that's impossible. Are there any medical students out there with coordination disorders, and if so, how do you manage? My plan B will be to look into other healthcare careers that require less dexterity, maybe psychotherapy, but this time I want to make 100% sure that plan A isn't viable first.
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    (Original post by Jarlaskald)
    I'm considering applying for a GEM course but I don't know if I'm being unrealistic even to think of it. I have pretty severe dyspraxia. I've been interested in medicine since I was a child, but when I was choosing GCSEs I reluctantly concluded that it probably wasn't going to be viable for me given my motor coordination problems and other issues. I did ask my occupational therapist if she thought it would be possible for me and she said that she didn't want to upset me, but if she walked into her local surgery for a blood test and it was me doing it she'd be worried the needle would end up in her nose instead of in her arm. So I dropped the idea without investigating it further. I wish I'd at least tried to get some work experience.

    Academically I did well (9A*s at GCSE, five As and a B at A-Level - this was before the A* at A-Level got introduced). I did my undergrad in history at Cambridge, followed by a PhD. I'm now 30 years old and working as a postdoc, but the niggling interest in medicine is still there. In the past I worked part-time as a HCA in a dementia ward, and feedback from nursing staff was that while I was slower than average at patient care (helping people to dress and go to the toilet, etc.), I was good at building relationships and communicating clearly with patients who were very distressed and whose behaviour could be challenging. Based on that I applied for a support worker job in a psychiatric unit, which I loved. I'm really interested in psychiatry and neurology. But I know that to get to that stage I'd have to demonstrate competency in lots of practical tasks and I don't want to waste time studying for UKCAT if I'm chasing something that's impossible. Are there any medical students out there with coordination disorders, and if so, how do you manage? My plan B will be to look into other healthcare careers that require less dexterity, maybe psychotherapy, but this time I want to make 100% sure that plan A isn't viable first.
    I don't do medicine but as a dyspraxic person myself I think only you know yourself if you re able to do those things, I did try mental health nursing myself for a bit but dropped out because I wasn't as fast as I wanted to be and shift work was too badly affecting me.Also that OT sounds absolutely awful to say such a thing.
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    When I read the title of this, the word 'dysdiadochokiensia' sprang to mind. It's on 'Fitness to Practice'.

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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    When I read the title of this, the word 'dysdiadochokiensia' sprang to mind. It's on 'Fitness to Practice'.

    There's no rapid movements with dyspraxia unless it's to move out of the way of the danger I have put myself in
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    There's no rapid movements with dyspraxia unless it's to move out of the way of the danger I have put myself in
    did you always know you were dyspraxic, or was it something which you sort of realised after a time of being a bit 'clumsy'?
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    (Original post by Jarlaskald)
    I'm considering applying for a GEM course but I don't know if I'm being unrealistic even to think of it. I have pretty severe dyspraxia. I've been interested in medicine since I was a child, but when I was choosing GCSEs I reluctantly concluded that it probably wasn't going to be viable for me given my motor coordination problems and other issues. I did ask my occupational therapist if she thought it would be possible for me and she said that she didn't want to upset me, but if she walked into her local surgery for a blood test and it was me doing it she'd be worried the needle would end up in her nose instead of in her arm. So I dropped the idea without investigating it further. I wish I'd at least tried to get some work experience.

    Academically I did well (9A*s at GCSE, five As and a B at A-Level - this was before the A* at A-Level got introduced). I did my undergrad in history at Cambridge, followed by a PhD. I'm now 30 years old and working as a postdoc, but the niggling interest in medicine is still there. In the past I worked part-time as a HCA in a dementia ward, and feedback from nursing staff was that while I was slower than average at patient care (helping people to dress and go to the toilet, etc.), I was good at building relationships and communicating clearly with patients who were very distressed and whose behaviour could be challenging. Based on that I applied for a support worker job in a psychiatric unit, which I loved. I'm really interested in psychiatry and neurology. But I know that to get to that stage I'd have to demonstrate competency in lots of practical tasks and I don't want to waste time studying for UKCAT if I'm chasing something that's impossible. Are there any medical students out there with coordination disorders, and if so, how do you manage? My plan B will be to look into other healthcare careers that require less dexterity, maybe psychotherapy, but this time I want to make 100% sure that plan A isn't viable first.
    Hm,I guess, you only find out by trying and going carefully through the course requirements. It may also depend on the university you go to, how much support there is and how much they expect from you. At least with your 30 years, I guess you have already a pretty good idea of what is possible or not.

    Furthermore your choices for specialisation will be limited, hence you should really look into whether those career path really interest you in longterm, also concerning career prospects and salary.
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    Thanks for the replies, everyone.

    I think the best thing would be for me to look for part-time or bank HCA work in a physical health setting that I could fit round my postdoc. In the psychiatric unit the patients didn't need a high level of physical care, and in the dementia unit I had strategies to mitigate my slowness - offering to work frequently with patients on 1:1 and 2:1 observations, for example, as dealing with the higher level of distress and confusion was actually easier for me than flying around the ward between the more able patients and only having about two minutes to spend helping each one to dress. But I worry that in medical school and as a junior doctor it might not be possible to find workarounds like this. A HCA job that involved lots of hands-on patient care in a fast-paced environment would probably give me a realistic enough idea of whether I'd manage or not. There is a hospice near me so I think I'll look there and see if they've got any jobs going.

    If there are any medical students here with dyspraxia or similar motor issues, I'd be interested to hear from you. I've met a few dyslexic doctors but never a dyspraxic one.
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    I have dyspraxia albeit a relatively mild case.

    I have offers to read Medicine but coincidentally I am also considering reading history.
 
 
 
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