Durhamgirl96
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Would you pay to be frozen until the technology responsible for reanimation becomes available?

I personally would, although the process itself is slightly morbid and doesn't bear thinking about whilst I'm in good health. I am terrified of death and feel that life is too short, if you factor in the mobility issues and loss of hearing/sight that accompanies old age.
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luq_ali
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This is an interesting question. On the one hand, the theory is that in the future, medical advances will arrive capable of reviving and healing those who have passed away, based upon cures and advances in medicine.

There is, however, as substantial concern with the technology of cryonics and preservation. Technology could very well exist to heal and revive the dead in the future-in theory. But that technology could be mutually independent of the technology used to preserve people, so if that current state of cryonics did not match with the technology, when it became avail, to revive or heal those frozen, you would basically have a body or organism unable to be helped based upon potentially archaic or primitive means of preservation. Now, if we remove religion and belief ins in the Afterlife and divine destiny fro the equation-for the sake of argument, there is, I suppose, nothing a person would have to lose, if they had no particular religious or spiritual beliefs to the contrary, having themselves, after death, frozen.

I am very concerned, for example, with the treatment of the "patients" and how their remains are stored, with verified reports of heads being severed from bodies-as in the case of professional baseball player, Ted Williams. I mean-decapitating a person who died from a heart attack, now means that you need technology to either revive someone who has suffered two critical injuries, or somehow be able to replicate that person, their consciousness, memories, etc.This gets into issues of cloning, and other considerations, and I'm unclear, if the idea is to heal me of what I died from, then why do further damage -rather than store the persons entire remains, you store their head or something and disregard the rest of their body. What is life and what is being revived? Is the storage of the body creating irreversible cellular death-furthering damage, under current technology, or keeping the status quo? Would you even be the same person with the same memories? (this would involve a myriad of other areas of science and study, converging perfectly at the same time!) Moreover, two hundred years from now, for example, who would you know? The Earth and The World might have changed significantly from what you remembered, and everything and everyone you knew would be gone.

So those are just some considerations to mull over.


(Original post by Durhamgirl96)
Would you pay to be frozen until the technology responsible for reanimation becomes available?

I personally would, although the process itself is slightly morbid and doesn't bear thinking about whilst I'm in good health. I am terrified of death and feel that life is too short, if you factor in the mobility issues and loss of hearing/sight that accompanies old age.
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username2911200
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(Original post by Durhamgirl96)
Would you pay to be frozen until the technology responsible for reanimation becomes available?

I personally would, although the process itself is slightly morbid and doesn't bear thinking about whilst I'm in good health. I am terrified of death and feel that life is too short, if you factor in the mobility issues and loss of hearing/sight that accompanies old age.
You have no idea if whoever finds you will actually bother to defrost you (integrating you into their society is a whole different issue). They might be scared of you and kill you, they might never find you after the lab you were frozen in explodes or gets destroyed before people even think about defrosting you, the technology to defrost you and keep you alive may never be invented, you don't know whether the government will find out about your frozen body and destroy it against your will, etc. There's absolutely no point in entertaining the idea, it's too ridiculous.
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Durhamgirl96
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Social issues aside, I will be dead.

I have read worrying articles about the treatment of patients under the care of Alcor too, and probably wouldn't run to them with my money. You raise some good points, points I hadn't considered. I'm excited for the future, so I'm not frightened of future Earth.
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Meany Pie
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No, when I get old I will be taking a one way trip to Switzerland.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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shadowdweller
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I don't think I would - life may be short, but I see that as a reason to try and live it to the full, not to try and artificially extend it.
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Durhamgirl96
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I've always considered prolonging my life by artificial means, I'm afraid of death (or rather, what happens after) and don't think I could ever come to terms with my life coming to an end indefinitely.
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applesforme
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At what age would you be frozen though? Before you start to really age, so like 40?
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OliviaRichmond1
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See, I've got a plan for when I die. I'm going to have my brain preserved which should happen by the time I die because scientists are working on a way to do that at the minute. Then when they come up with the technology for functioning robots, my brain can be implanted into that, hence giving me new life. The rest of me, I am having cremated and, much like my mother is doing, compressed into a jewel then put into a piece of jewellery so my future child(ren) won't be tethered to one place where my grave is because that can transport me with them to any place at all. I'd become my own family heirloom 😂😳
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Durhamgirl96
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If I die before 30, I want my whole body to be preserved. 50 is a stretch. My other idea was for my coffin to be sent into space, but then I probably have no hope whatsoever! If I had dementia, I would have to ride it out and be buried, given that I would be mentally gone by the time I passed and you have to die of illness or natural causes to qualify for preservation, as suicide or murder implicates the cryonics service.
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luq_ali
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At my law school, we had mostly students who had graduated with their bachelor of science or art degrees (some had masters degrees in other fields like nursing,etc.), and had worked for 2-4 years, I was one of the few who had gone straight through. But then, we also had the ones who were in their 50's and 60's. I remember, and I feel stupid and immature to admit this, but I remember looking at them, thinking "man, what is this old person doing up in here, they will be dead in a few years." Now, of course, I was 25 after my three years of law school, and by then, I had came to realize that life is what you make it. Old and young become a matter of the condition of someone's thinking and (baring injuries or illness) what they put into themselves and how well they take care of themselves.

Here is an example of one athlete who defies age:
https://www.runnersworld.com/masters...-break-records

No one knows the future, really. To go to sleep and wake up, thanks to cryonics,in say 100 years(again, preserving human tissue is one thing, preserving the mind and its content, awareness, memories, personality, even presuming there was no brain damage, and that the brain could be revived in its activity-I again would caution, would that person be you, or a memory wiped clean or missing critical elements?), one might be waking up to a post-nuclear wasteland-after all, the future is made by those who shape the policies and directions of things now...we already have an earth that has less than 20% oxygen in its environment, done from the low 30% just a mere 120 years or so ago. You see, the future of the oxygen depletion of planet-belong to those industrialists and polluters and manufacturers(and the politicians and regulatory folks they control) who made a decision to go for money at the expense of human lives and safety. Now, we see a rise, of course, in cancers and related maladies, and of course cancer rates increase in oxygen deprived environments, so as we have less oxygen on our planet, well...the price or the bill of those who wrote the future back in the past...the bill, as the saying goes, always comes do.

(Original post by Durhamgirl96)
If I die before 30, I want my whole body to be preserved. 50 is a stretch. My other idea was for my coffin to be sent into space, but then I probably have no hope whatsoever! If I had dementia, I would have to ride it out and be buried, given that I would be mentally gone by the time I passed and you have to die of illness or natural causes to qualify for preservation, as suicide or murder implicates the cryonics service.
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