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    Does it matter which medical school you go to? (UK)
    If it doesn't matter why do people take the BMAT. and try to go to oxbridge so badly?
    So in my case, would it be better for me to go to (for example) Newcastle university instead of Imperial, as it is cheaper (assuming both the teaching styles etc suit me)
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    (Original post by I did nazi u)
    Does it matter which medical school you go to? (UK)
    If it doesn't matter why do people take the BMAT. and try to go to oxbridge so badly?
    So in my case, would it be better for me to go to (for example) Newcastle university instead of Imperial, as it is cheaper (assuming both the teaching styles etc suit me)
    Not really. They all have GMC recognized/accredited degrees. Some people just prefer the teaching style/collegiate structure of Oxbridge (I think it's 3 years theory and then you move onto clinical) and some people just do it for the "prestige" which doesn't matter all that much, especially for a medical degree.

    Personal preference really.

    Check out how each university teaches and see if it is for you.
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    (Original post by I did nazi u)
    Does it matter which medical school you go to? (UK)
    If it doesn't matter why do people take the BMAT. and try to go to oxbridge so badly?
    So in my case, would it be better for me to go to (for example) Newcastle university instead of Imperial, as it is cheaper (assuming both the teaching styles etc suit me)
    Technically no as all medicine universities in the UK are GMC accredited and so graduate from any and you will get a PMQ and some variation on MB, BS.

    Some universities like Oxbridge and Imperial have a compulsory intercalated BSc which draws some and the teaching style is a bit different. It's all nice to be surrounded by like-minded people.

    When it comes to applying to your F1-post, it is done competitively and 50% of the decision is based on your academics. If you went to a good uni and got good academics, you may come out ahead in this category (keep in mind 50% is still SJT though. I think anyway).

    For a lot of people though, it is prestige; to say you went to Oxbridge.
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    (Original post by I did nazi u)
    Does it matter which medical school you go to? (UK)
    If it doesn't matter why do people take the BMAT. and try to go to oxbridge so badly?
    So in my case, would it be better for me to go to (for example) Newcastle university instead of Imperial, as it is cheaper (assuming both the teaching styles etc suit me)
    A lot of getting into med school is applying strategically. If you have all A*s at GCSE and are the sort of person who'd do well in the BMAT, Oxford would be a good choice to apply for - prestigious or not. If you don't have any A*s and you don't do well in exams, but you still insist on applying for Oxford then yeah, that's a bad move.

    I suppose some reasons why people apply to Oxbridge (apart from the prestige factor - which I suspect is rather oversimplifying it) is the course structure, intercalation options, college system, liking the sound of the tutorial/supervision system, the extracurricular activities available, the fact that both Oxford and Cambridge are very pretty etc. I didn't go to Oxbridge but my sister did (not for medicine) - I think there were lots of reasons why she wanted to go there, not just that it was the "best".

    Financial considerations are important, if you think you might encounter difficulties living in London then yeah, it's entirely reasonable to consider universities elsewhere.
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    (Original post by Bow Tie)
    Technically no as all medicine universities in the UK are GMC accredited and so graduate from any and you will get a PMQ and some variation on MB, BS.

    Some universities like Oxbridge and Imperial have a compulsory intercalated BSc which draws some and the teaching style is a bit different. It's all nice to be surrounded by like-minded people.

    When it comes to applying to your F1-post, it is done competitively and 50% of the decision is based on your academics. If you went to a good uni and got good academics, you may come out ahead in this category (keep in mind 50% is still SJT though. I think anyway).

    For a lot of people though, it is prestige; to say you went to Oxbridge.
    FPAS points are awarded by decile rank within your own university. The actual university you go to plays no role in it.


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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    FPAS points are awarded by decile rank within your own university. The actual university you go to plays no role in it.


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    Wouldn't it be a good idea to pick a medical school (provided the teaching is good) where it is easier to get into a higher decile rank i.e. la uni which has less academically able students (I know everyone is able, but *less*)
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    (Original post by I did nazi u)
    Wouldn't it be a good idea to pick a medical school (provided the teaching is good) where it is easier to get into a higher decile rank i.e. la uni which has less academically able students (I know everyone is able, but *less*)
    Whilst you could argue that places like Oxbridge may be harder to get a high decile in, due to smaller cohort and generally slightly higher academics, I don't think it's a method that will work.
    Firstly how do you decide which universities have more academically able? Number of GCSE A*s? Don't mean diddly squat when you're actually at medical school. You can predict how well you, or others, will perform at med school. People who have always been high flying academically can struggle just as those who struggled at a level can flourish at med school. Plus every med school examines in slightly different ways, so you don't really know how you'll fare with SBAs vs EMQ vs MCQ vs SAQ.

    Too many variables. And not worth enough in the long run to base a decision on.


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