sammagnus2016
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I'm wanting to do Ancient History at uni and everyone keeps asking me what I could do with the degree, and although I've looked, I'd still like someone else's word for what I might be able to do with a degree afterwards. Thanks
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999tigger
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(Original post by sammagnus2016)
I'm wanting to do Ancient History at uni and everyone keeps asking me what I could do with the degree, and although I've looked, I'd still like someone else's word for what I might be able to do with a degree afterwards. Thanks
Besides teaching and academia, then your degree would teach you highly useful transferable skills.

It will depend on your uni plus class of degree as well. Better the uni and class then the more options you will have.

Lots of jobs are non degree specific.

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...degree/history
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username2981082
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(Original post by sammagnus2016)
I'm wanting to do Ancient History at uni and everyone keeps asking me what I could do with the degree, and although I've looked, I'd still like someone else's word for what I might be able to do with a degree afterwards. Thanks
I don't study Ancient History but a general history degree along with English Lit. With most humanities degrees, you can go into anything you want. The most popular careers that humanities graduates go into are law, teaching, the civil service, politics, archiving and records management, heritage, and museum curatorship. These aren't the only careers you can do. There are many more.

I plan to go into law or teaching. My friend graduated with history last year and is now working in marketing. My other friend, who graduated with a medieval history degree is now training to be a social worker.
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sammagnus2016
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Besides teaching and academia, then your degree would teach you highly useful transferable skills.

It will depend on your uni plus class of degree as well. Better the uni and class then the more options you will have.

Lots of jobs are non degree specific.

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...degree/history
I'm thinking of applying to Kent and Exeter (as two of the five choices, I haven't decided on the others yet). Thanks for the link!
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sammagnus2016
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(Original post by constantine2016)
I don't study Ancient History but a general history degree along with English Lit. With most humanities degrees, you can go into anything you want. The most popular careers that humanities graduates go into are law, teaching, the civil service, politics, archiving and records management, heritage, and museum curatorship. These aren't the only careers you can do. There are many more.

I plan to go into law or teaching. My friend graduated with history last year and is now working in marketing. My other friend, who graduated with a medieval history degree is now training to be a social worker.
Thanks, its great to know what people who're doing similar things have chosen to go into. I've been thinking of either law or teaching as well so that's helpful
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999tigger
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(Original post by sammagnus2016)
I'm thinking of applying to Kent and Exeter (as two of the five choices, I haven't decided on the others yet). Thanks for the link!
The other thing you can do is ask the unis for data for where their ex students go after graduation.
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username2981082
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(Original post by sammagnus2016)
Thanks, its great to know what people who're doing similar things have chosen to go into. I've been thinking of either law or teaching as well so that's helpful
Law is very popular amongst history graduates because its workload and assessments are very similar to history. You can easily adapt to it compared to other disciplines. Being a solicitor/barrister is also not the only career you can have in law. I've decided to be a paralegal because interacting with people is not my strongest trait and solicitors/barristers do a lot of face-to-face client interaction.
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sammagnus2016
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(Original post by constantine2016)
Law is very popular amongst history graduates because its workload and assessments are very similar to history. You can easily adapt to it compared to other disciplines. Being a solicitor/barrister is also not the only career you can have in law. I've decided to be a paralegal because interacting with people is not my strongest trait and solicitors/barristers do a lot of face-to-face client interaction.
How do you go about getting into law after taking a history degree?
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username2981082
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(Original post by sammagnus2016)
How do you go about getting into law after taking a history degree?
There are many ways. The most common way is to do the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL). This qualification is recognised by most law firms in the UK and is highly respected. BPP University and the University of Law is where most law firms send their trainees to get the GDL.

You can also do the CILEX route which is a more affordable alternative to the GDL. CILEX also offers legal apprenticeships that people who already have a degree can do. There is a solicitors apprenticeship which takes 6 years to complete and a paralegal apprenticeship which takes 2 years to complete.

Someone I know did the 2 year paralegal apprenticeship. They then used the money they saved up from the salary they earned as an apprentice to do the GDL (the GDL doesn't qualify for student finance). They scored a distinction and then applied for a training contract. Thanks to the legal experience they had from the paralegal apprenticeship, as well as achieving a good grade on the GDL, they managed to secure a training contract and is now a fully qualified solicitor. They were a history graduate btw.

In the end, your degree does not really matter when it comes to getting the career you want. It is all about how much work and ambition you are willing to put in to get to that point. If you enjoy studying Ancient History then don't be put off from studying it because of job prospects. Only you determine what your job prospects are going to be like.
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sammagnus2016
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(Original post by constantine2016)
There are many ways. The most common way is to do the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL). This qualification is recognised by most law firms in the UK and is highly respected. BPP University and the University of Law is where most law firms send their trainees to get the GDL.

You can also do the CILEX route which is a more affordable alternative to the GDL. CILEX also offers legal apprenticeships that people who already have a degree can do. There is a solicitors apprenticeship which takes 6 years to complete and a paralegal apprenticeship which takes 2 years to complete.

Someone I know did the 2 year paralegal apprenticeship. They then used the money they saved up from the salary they earned as an apprentice to do the GDL (the GDL doesn't qualify for student finance). They scored a distinction and then applied for a training contract. Thanks to the legal experience they had from the paralegal apprenticeship, as well as achieving a good grade on the GDL, they managed to secure a training contract and is now a fully qualified solicitor. They were a history graduate btw.

In the end, your degree does not really matter when it comes to getting the career you want. It is all about how much work and ambition you are willing to put in to get to that point. If you enjoy studying Ancient History then don't be put off from studying it because of job prospects. Only you determine what your job prospects are going to be like.
Thanks so much for all your help!
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