Byeee
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Hey, was just wandering if all lawyers present in courtroom????
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Roving Fish
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Heya, I moved your thread to Careers: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4876568 so that it could get some better answers.

I'll move this thread to the appropriate forum too, but I would suggest that you might not want to pursue Law unless you're comfortable with conveying an argument or debate in front of people.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Byeee)
Hey, was just wandering if all lawyers present in courtroom????
No. A lot of lawyers end up resolving the client's issues outside of court, whether it's mediation or other forms of settlement.

It's not Law and Order UK where a lawyer ends up in a court room every 2 seconds.

A solicitor would probably give the advice to the client and then a Barrister would do the advocacy in a courtroom.
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username2981082
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(Original post by Byeee)
Hey, was just wandering if all lawyers present in courtroom????
No. It is mostly barristers who will present in court. Solicitors can appear in court as advocates though. This can be done by solicitors taking a Higher Rights of Audience course. Solicitors who haven't done this course and has a client whose case has to go to court, will generally refer the case to a barrister, who will deal with it.
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Crumpet1
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Mainly barristers do the speaking in court.

Solicitors do general legal advisory work day to day and prepare cases for court when necessary, but don't usually do the presenting in court (though they could if they wanted to at many court levels)
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username2896864
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
No. A lot of lawyers end up resolving the client's issues outside of court, whether it's meditation or other forms of settlement.

It's not Law and Order UK where a lawyer ends up in a court room every 2 seconds.

A solicitor would probably give the advice to the client and then a Barrister would do the advocacy in a courtroom.
Don't you mean mediation?
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Batgirl98)
Don't you mean mediation?
Yes, I do!

Wouldn't surprise me if they do use meditation to calm down now and again!
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bobby147
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Yes, I do!

Wouldn't surprise me if they do use meditation to calm down now and again!
Trump and Kim could use a bit of that right now.
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InArduisFouette
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Both Solicitors and Barristers do a lot of advisory / desk work.

Traditionally barristers were the only ones allowed to advocate in the crown and high courts ... but there are lots of Barristers who do their advocacy in Regulatory settings e.g. fitness to Practice and other such things.

Barristers also tend to be specialists in one or two subspecialities rather than a broad range of topics e.g. the average high st solicitor tends to be either criminal / property / family +divorce

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luq_ali
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I'm a lawyer, and I can tell you NOT all lawyers go to court or even talk in front of big groups of people. Lawyers work in education as teachers, administrators, some lawyers go into arbitration and mediation-essentially acting as referees in disputes between parties and trying to resolve, short of litigation, those disputes. You have lawyers working diplomacy, and in areas of essential relief in various NGO's, from the United Nations to the World Health Organization, you have patent lawyers, making $500 or more per hour, to read and review patent applications, advise companies on those type of issues, you have corporate counsel who review actions with legal consequences to the corporation-and if warranted-they will refer those cases out to outside counsel to resolve them, you have lawyers working in real estate law, writing and negotiating contracts, you have lawyers advising hospitals and many other types of lawyers,lawyers who are consultants on treaties or writing new ones, or who are consultants to human rights groups and or lawyers who work in politics-they aren't in courtrooms-there are lawyers who are doing so many different things who never step into a courtroom. So its a very broad field, with no limits-you have lawyers who have gone on to be famous television reporters and commentators (like Howard Cossell) or writers and publishers of books. The big question is to focus on what you want to do and see if a legal training will benefit those goals, and if so, then go for it.

(Original post by Byeee)
Hey, was just wandering if all lawyers present in courtroom????
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