Will support for Hitler increase in the future? Watch

Arran90
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I was thinking about this: When the generation that lived through WW2 dies off, then the post war baby boomers die off, WW2 will become a distant event and a mark in history. Do you think that society will re-assess WW2 and support for Hitler will increase?
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ByronicHero
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Unless zombie Hitler comes to fruition, I am unsure that any amount of support will see him re-elected.

But no, I don't think that broadly that will happen. 'Society' can't reassess anything, but I see no reason for the zeitgeist to spin in that direction. The extent to which the issues associated with the war remain relevant will vary enormously over the time as people change and things happen but I don't think we are likely en-masse to change our minds about Hitler. We will probably be less likely to say unkind things about 'the Germans' as prejudices fade - though this is rather a different thing.

Noel Coward sang it best: Don't Let's Be Beastly To The Germans!
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username2766878
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(Original post by Arran90)
I was thinking about this: When the generation that lived through WW2 dies off, then the post war baby boomers die off, WW2 will become a distant event and a mark in history. Do you think that society will re-assess WW2 and support for Hitler will increase?
Support for dead men is both futile and stupid. If it his ideas you refer to, no. The era of popular support for white supremacy and anti-Semitism is over. Social media might make it look like the number of out and proud Nazis is on the rise, but that's only because our awareness and coverage of these groups is increasing. Political parties based on racial supremacy haven't fared well electorally since the end of WW2 and I doubt they will amongst a generation who voted heavily for Jeremy Corbyn at the last general election and heavily to remain in the EU. Nazism as a political force is pretty much extinct.
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Arran90
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(Original post by Sycatonne23)
Support for dead men is both futile and stupid. If it his ideas you refer to, no. The era of popular support for white supremacy and anti-Semitism is over. Social media might make it look like the number of out and proud Nazis is on the rise, but that's only because our awareness and coverage of these groups is increasing. Political parties based on racial supremacy haven't fared well electorally since the end of WW2 and I doubt they will amongst a generation who voted heavily for Jeremy Corbyn at the last general election and heavily to remain in the EU. Nazism as a political force is pretty much extinct.
I question this. In India the RSS is partially inspired by Hitler and it has many members and supporters in Britain amongst the Hindu community. Muslims also tend to view Hitler through different eyes from your average Dad's Army watching Brit. Few Muslims see Hitler as a hero but most Muslims are no fans of Churchill because he was a staunch Zionist.

Your argument that support for dead men is both futile and stupid could equally apply to Churchill as it does to Hitler. The post war generation has been brought up (or even brainwashed) into thinking that Churchill was a national hero but over time more people could start to question him. What is difficult to deny is that he was a weak and mediocre peacetime leader.

A small number of people who voted to remain in the EU are pan-European white nationalists who want Europe to be a single nation of white European people.
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Picnic1
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No, what will (and has) happened is that things change shape in order to survive. Or the supposed lesser evils, that were kept in check by the supposed greater evil, are given free reign and are far less manageable because that kind of evil itself claims itself to be some kind of victim.

Hitler-like effects in effect still exist. A bomb might visibly destroy a building but so can a planning committee.
A bomb might kill a civilian but so can an uncaring society's attitudes.

Unless we make society wholly capitalist or wholly socialistic (it doesn't matter which - the clarity will still allow the 'opposing' ideal to thrive), it will get worse in to a mess of conflicting philosophies. Which is all very well in the right hands but in the hands of the general public it understandably confuses them massively.
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Spiderman
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I think as time goes on, people will view it with of a sense of detachment, like we do with Alexander the Great or Genghis Khan. Both of them were utter c*nts and are widely acknowledged as being so, but I wouldn't say they stir up people's hatred like Hitler does. I reckon there'll be a cooling off period, but not so much an increase in support.

Dan Carlin did a great podcast series called 'Hardcore History' and the first episode is about comparing our perspectives of Hitler and Alexander the Great. He brings up the idea that, in time, people may view Hitler in a similar way - with some people taking a keen interest in what he did without necessarily giving it all an overarching narrative of evilness. People don't necessarily do that with Alexander the Great and yet he killed loads. It's a podcast series that's well worth checking out, if you're interested in it.
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the bear
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maybe people in the future will look back on Fred West's achievements in home improvement rather than other areas.
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Spiderman
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Hitler was very nice to his dog, apparently.
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crosssafley
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Pundits say that when the support reaches its zenith HITLER WILL RISE FROM THE DEAD and lead the white man to greatness once more
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Arran90
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The problem facing historians of Hitler is inertia. In a time of war the official history is made by the victor regardless of whether it is true or not. Historians of Hitler who wish to deviate from the official narrative are up against the mainstream media, the education system, and various Holocaust remembrance groups who will not accept that Hitler is anything but pure evil who killed 6 million Jews. Even Historians of Hitler who deviate from the official narrative but portray him in a generally unfavourable light are still nabbed hard.

The question is whether in time as older generations die out and new generations emerge whether the power of the organisations against Historians of Hitler who choose to deviate from the official narrative will weaken or not.
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ThomH97
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Support for Hitler how? Perhaps some of his philosophies can be respected such as tackling unemployment, promoting family values and building infrastructure, but those aren't unique to him so no need to attribute them to him.
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r3035
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(Original post by Arran90)
I was thinking about this: When the generation that lived through WW2 dies off, then the post war baby boomers die off, WW2 will become a distant event and a mark in history. Do you think that society will re-assess WW2 and support for Hitler will increase?
Yes

Whites are being gang raped, racially attacked, being told they don't exist, discriminated against, told they have no culture, abused and spat upon for being white, murdered and tortured en masse in South Africa, being forced to take in refugees but no other countries are,

really what choice do they have ?
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username2766878
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(Original post by Arran90)
I question this. In India the RSS is partially inspired by Hitler and it has many members and supporters in Britain amongst the Hindu community. Muslims also tend to view Hitler through different eyes from your average Dad's Army watching Brit. Few Muslims see Hitler as a hero but most Muslims are no fans of Churchill because he was a staunch Zionist.

Your argument that support for dead men is both futile and stupid could equally apply to Churchill as it does to Hitler. The post war generation has been brought up (or even brainwashed) into thinking that Churchill was a national hero but over time more people could start to question him. What is difficult to deny is that he was a weak and mediocre peacetime leader.

A small number of people who voted to remain in the EU are pan-European white nationalists who want Europe to be a single nation of white European people.
Last time I checked, the RSS were Hindu nationalists and not white supremacists. That being said, I thought you asked about Europe and North America in which I can definitely say Nazism will never be a political force again. The pushback will be too great. Nazis can barely hold a rally without being punched in the face by anti-Nazi counter protesters, how on Earth will they win and maintain seats at an election? There'll always be a bunch of white supremacists but they'll be on the margins of political discourse.
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Arran90
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(Original post by Sycatonne23)
Nazis can barely hold a rally without being punched in the face by anti-Nazi counter protesters
The far left is in terminal decline. The collapse of communism in the Soviet Union was a major blow to communist movements worldwide which have receded into the shadows in most countries. The anti-fascism movement in Britain is far weaker now than it was in the 1970s and 80s due to the decline in communist and far left parties which provided a large source of manpower and funding. Although the BNP under Nick Griffin was not exactly a Neo-Nazi movement, the anti-fascists were far less effective at countering it than they were back in the 1970s and 80s with the National Front.
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shadowdweller
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I can't imagine a situation where this would occur, personally. There are plenty of long in the past events where viewpoints haven't much changed since, and it's not like it's a viewpoint that warrants any kind of support.

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Chichaldo
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Not if things stay the same without any mainstream propaganda advocating it.
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