Why we shouldn't legalise marijuana

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username2766878
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1) It isn't harmless.

Contrary to popular opinion which depicts marijuana as a harmless drug which has no serious negative effects on the body, marijuana has been linked to the inducement of a variety of unpleasant mental health issues like anxiety and paranoia. The consequences are more pronounced on younger users because of marijuana's interference with concentration and use and organisation of information skills. A 2012 New Zealand study found a strong statistical correlation between persistent marijuana use and lower IQ of kids followed from age 13 to 38 (
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927402). A study in France of nearly 11,000 drivers found that even after alcohol was taken into account, regular cannabis users were twice as more likely to be a cause of road accidents (
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1309644/).
Granted scientists haven't determined an exact casual link between marijuana use and mental health issues, but science was at this point fifty years ago with the correlation between tobacco and lung cancer.

2) Just because two poisons are legal, doesn't mean a third should be.

Many people point to the legality of alcohol and tobacco when justifying marijuana legalisation. Their point is that alcohol and tobacco are noticeably more harmful than marijuana (mainly because scientists have been able to study and ascertain the harm which comes from drinking and smoking, harder to do with an illegal drug) but still legal-so why shouldn't marijuana be legal too? This is an absurd argument. Ask yourself, if alcohol and tobacco were introduced today and you were fully aware of their health consequences and they were fringe substances, would you legalise them? Surely not. The harm that we would have to deal with wouldn't be worth the legality. Drink driving, alcoholism and anti-social behaviour, fatty liver disease and lung cancer. It's only because alcohol and tobacco have existed for hundreds of years when we were ignorant of their effects and because alcohol and tobacco are used so widely that making them illegal is impossible, which brings me to my third point:

3) Prohibition reduces use.

Numbers do not lie, and it is an indisputable fact that the illegality of marijuana means less people use it than would if it were a legal substance sold in corner shops. According to NHS drug misuse statistics, a total of 2.1 million people used marijuana in the UK between 2015 and 2016, a falling percentage compared to users a decade ago, 6.5% today compared to 8.7% a decade ago (
http://content.digital.nhs.uk/catalo...g-2016-rep.pdf). Compare that to the 29 million Brits who drank alcohol (
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...ain/2005to2016) and the 17.2% of Brits who smoke cigarettes (
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...atbritain/2015). There were more e-cigarette users alone in 2015 than marijuana users altogether. Ask yourself, which can be bought over the counter, and which cannot? If you legalise marijuana and bring it into shops, more people will use it.

4) Legalisation won't kill the black market.

Bringing marijuana under the control of big corporations and giant businesses won't end the gangsters and thugs who profit from it. If you want an example, look at tobacco. Illegal cigarettes cost the taxpayer £2bn in 2016, in the same year we illegally imported 5.5 billion untaxed illicit counterfeit cigarettes. A study in the US by Deborah Hasin, a Columbia University Professor, found that states which allowed medicinal use of marijuana saw faster increases in illegal marijuana use than states which didn't allow medicinal use. In the UK, many marijuana users are hooked to strong variations of the drug with high levels of THC that would most certainly be regulated downwards in a legal market, providing plenty of incentive for the black market to continue operating.

5) We haven't bothered to enforce the laws on marijuana possession.

Marijuana, though not legalised, is effectively decriminalised in the UK. What's the difference you ask? Well, it can't be sold in shops, but you're unlikely to ever face serious judicial consequences if you get caught using it. Marijuana possession arrests have fallen half since 2010 with only a tiny fraction of possession cases leading to prison time. You cannot interdict supply without interdicting demand. The people who pour their money into marijuana and other illegal drugs are the people who keep the mobsters and smugglers in business. People who are put into jail for marijuana possession almost always have other convictions alongside possession. It's a normal police strategy to convict somebody on drug possession when that person is associated with numerous other forms of criminal activity. There has never been a war on drugs in the UK, certainly not a war on marijuana.

Legalising marijuana in the UK and bringing it into our corner shops and supermarkets would be an irreversible act of stupidity that we would all come to regret later on.
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username3118454
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Regarding your first point:

Correlation does not equal causation. Some time ago there was a correlation found between lung cancer and alcohol consumption. It was then explained by the fact that more people drink when they smoke.

And you have to be a special kind of stupid to drive while you're high.
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fliscia
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If there's no war on marijuana why not just legalise the use of it to leave people free to use it if they want to but only legalise it in specific stores where a license must be earned first. And if it's an issue for developing minds why not simply ban say people under 21 from using it.
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Alan-Moore
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(Original post by Sycatonne23)
1) It isn't harmless.

Contrary to popular opinion which depicts marijuana as a harmless drug which has no serious negative effects on the body, marijuana has been linked to the inducement of a variety of unpleasant mental health issues like anxiety and paranoia. The consequences are more pronounced on younger users because of marijuana's interference with concentration and use and organisation of information skills. A 2012 New Zealand study found a strong statistical correlation between persistent marijuana use and lower IQ of kids followed from age 13 to 38 (
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927402). A study in France of nearly 11,000 drivers found that even after alcohol was taken into account, regular cannabis users were twice as more likely to be a cause of road accidents (
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1309644/).
Granted scientists haven't determined an exact casual link between marijuana use and mental health issues, but science was at this point fifty years ago with the correlation between tobacco and lung cancer.

2) Just because two poisons are legal, doesn't mean a third should be.

Many people point to the legality of alcohol and tobacco when justifying marijuana legalisation. Their point is that alcohol and tobacco are noticeably more harmful than marijuana (mainly because scientists have been able to study and ascertain the harm which comes from drinking and smoking, harder to do with an illegal drug) but still legal-so why shouldn't marijuana be legal too? This is an absurd argument. Ask yourself, if alcohol and tobacco were introduced today and you were fully aware of their health consequences and they were fringe substances, would you legalise them? Surely not. The harm that we would have to deal with wouldn't be worth the legality. Drink driving, alcoholism and anti-social behaviour, fatty liver disease and lung cancer. It's only because alcohol and tobacco have existed for hundreds of years when we were ignorant of their effects and because alcohol and tobacco are used so widely that making them illegal is impossible, which brings me to my third point:

3) Prohibition reduces use.

Numbers do not lie, and it is an indisputable fact that the illegality of marijuana means less people use it than would if it were a legal substance sold in corner shops. According to NHS drug misuse statistics, a total of 2.1 million people used marijuana in the UK between 2015 and 2016, a falling percentage compared to users a decade ago, 6.5% today compared to 8.7% a decade ago (
http://content.digital.nhs.uk/catalo...g-2016-rep.pdf). Compare that to the 29 million Brits who drank alcohol (
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...ain/2005to2016) and the 17.2% of Brits who smoke cigarettes (
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...atbritain/2015). There were more e-cigarette users alone in 2015 than marijuana users altogether. Ask yourself, which can be bought over the counter, and which cannot? If you legalise marijuana and bring it into shops, more people will use it.

4) Legalisation won't kill the black market.

Bringing marijuana under the control of big corporations and giant businesses won't end the gangsters and thugs who profit from it. If you want an example, look at tobacco. Illegal cigarettes cost the taxpayer £2bn in 2016, in the same year we illegally imported 5.5 billion untaxed illicit counterfeit cigarettes. A study in the US by Deborah Hasin, a Columbia University Professor, found that states which allowed medicinal use of marijuana saw faster increases in illegal marijuana use than states which didn't allow medicinal use. In the UK, many marijuana users are hooked to strong variations of the drug with high levels of THC that would most certainly be regulated downwards in a legal market, providing plenty of incentive for the black market to continue operating.

5) We haven't bothered to enforce the laws on marijuana possession.

Marijuana, though not legalised, is effectively decriminalised in the UK. What's the difference you ask? Well, it can't be sold in shops, but you're unlikely to ever face serious judicial consequences if you get caught using it. Marijuana possession arrests have fallen half since 2010 with only a tiny fraction of possession cases leading to prison time. You cannot interdict supply without interdicting demand. The people who pour their money into marijuana and other illegal drugs are the people who keep the mobsters and smugglers in business. People who are put into jail for marijuana possession almost always have other convictions alongside possession. It's a normal police strategy to convict somebody on drug possession when that person is associated with numerous other forms of criminal activity. There has never been a war on drugs in the UK, certainly not a war on marijuana.

Legalising marijuana in the UK and bringing it into our corner shops and supermarkets would be an irreversible act of stupidity that we would all come to regret later on.
It can also help anxiety. Cannabis is being sold in pills to help anxiety depression and such. I'm sorry but I'm with The Beatles on this one.
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artful_lounger
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The most compelling reason imo is all the potheads may become even more obnoxious about it, ala the vapers.
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CleverSquirrel
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
The most compelling reason imo is all the potheads may become even more obnoxious about it, ala the vapers.
i second that- they are so big headed anyway, it'll just make them more unbearable
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bobby147
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(Original post by CleverSquirrel)
i second that- they are so big headed anyway, it'll just make them more unbearable
I swear you just keep getting cuter and cuter in your profile picture,I can't handle this level of cuteness :p:).
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username2080673
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I don't care about harm to the individual or supposed assumed or estimated guesswork at whether or not people consume cannabis. I care for individual freedoms and trusting people to make their own decisions - which is why we should legalise all drugs.
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IamJacksContempt
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I'd rather take the hundreds of millions of pounds in tax revenues thanks.
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username2926188
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Who would want to marry Juana?
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CleverSquirrel
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(Original post by bobby147)
I swear you just keep getting cuter and cuter in your profile picture,I can't handle this level of cuteness :p:).
Hahaha awwww thank you my dear :hugs:
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4ÆM
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Why not legalise weed and add tax to it? Governments would make a lot of money this way. The same way as cigarettes
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kish667
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(Original post by Sycatonne23)
1) It isn't harmless.

Contrary to popular opinion which depicts marijuana as a harmless drug which has no serious negative effects on the body, marijuana has been linked to the inducement of a variety of unpleasant mental health issues like anxiety and paranoia. The consequences are more pronounced on younger users because of marijuana's interference with concentration and use and organisation of information skills. A 2012 New Zealand study found a strong statistical correlation between persistent marijuana use and lower IQ of kids followed from age 13 to 38 (
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927402). A study in France of nearly 11,000 drivers found that even after alcohol was taken into account, regular cannabis users were twice as more likely to be a cause of road accidents (
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1309644/).
Granted scientists haven't determined an exact casual link between marijuana use and mental health issues, but science was at this point fifty years ago with the correlation between tobacco and lung cancer.

2) Just because two poisons are legal, doesn't mean a third should be.

Many people point to the legality of alcohol and tobacco when justifying marijuana legalisation. Their point is that alcohol and tobacco are noticeably more harmful than marijuana (mainly because scientists have been able to study and ascertain the harm which comes from drinking and smoking, harder to do with an illegal drug) but still legal-so why shouldn't marijuana be legal too? This is an absurd argument. Ask yourself, if alcohol and tobacco were introduced today and you were fully aware of their health consequences and they were fringe substances, would you legalise them? Surely not. The harm that we would have to deal with wouldn't be worth the legality. Drink driving, alcoholism and anti-social behaviour, fatty liver disease and lung cancer. It's only because alcohol and tobacco have existed for hundreds of years when we were ignorant of their effects and because alcohol and tobacco are used so widely that making them illegal is impossible, which brings me to my third point:

3) Prohibition reduces use.

Numbers do not lie, and it is an indisputable fact that the illegality of marijuana means less people use it than would if it were a legal substance sold in corner shops. According to NHS drug misuse statistics, a total of 2.1 million people used marijuana in the UK between 2015 and 2016, a falling percentage compared to users a decade ago, 6.5% today compared to 8.7% a decade ago (
http://content.digital.nhs.uk/catalo...g-2016-rep.pdf). Compare that to the 29 million Brits who drank alcohol (
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...ain/2005to2016) and the 17.2% of Brits who smoke cigarettes (
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...atbritain/2015). There were more e-cigarette users alone in 2015 than marijuana users altogether. Ask yourself, which can be bought over the counter, and which cannot? If you legalise marijuana and bring it into shops, more people will use it.

4) Legalisation won't kill the black market.

Bringing marijuana under the control of big corporations and giant businesses won't end the gangsters and thugs who profit from it. If you want an example, look at tobacco. Illegal cigarettes cost the taxpayer £2bn in 2016, in the same year we illegally imported 5.5 billion untaxed illicit counterfeit cigarettes. A study in the US by Deborah Hasin, a Columbia University Professor, found that states which allowed medicinal use of marijuana saw faster increases in illegal marijuana use than states which didn't allow medicinal use. In the UK, many marijuana users are hooked to strong variations of the drug with high levels of THC that would most certainly be regulated downwards in a legal market, providing plenty of incentive for the black market to continue operating.

5) We haven't bothered to enforce the laws on marijuana possession.

Marijuana, though not legalised, is effectively decriminalised in the UK. What's the difference you ask? Well, it can't be sold in shops, but you're unlikely to ever face serious judicial consequences if you get caught using it. Marijuana possession arrests have fallen half since 2010 with only a tiny fraction of possession cases leading to prison time. You cannot interdict supply without interdicting demand. The people who pour their money into marijuana and other illegal drugs are the people who keep the mobsters and smugglers in business. People who are put into jail for marijuana possession almost always have other convictions alongside possession. It's a normal police strategy to convict somebody on drug possession when that person is associated with numerous other forms of criminal activity. There has never been a war on drugs in the UK, certainly not a war on marijuana.

Legalising marijuana in the UK and bringing it into our corner shops and supermarkets would be an irreversible act of stupidity that we would all come to regret later on.
On your first point that it does harm people, firstly those are just correlations not causations which doesnt meant its true. Secondly if we do legalise it it will mean less kids will smoke it as you would have to be 18 plus and marijuana only affects your iq if you are 21 or older. Plus marijuana also as a numerous amounts of health benefits, such as helping anxiety, it is linked with helping ptsd and parkinson.

Your second argument makes little sense as alcohol and cigarettes have been proven to cause death whereas there are no deaths caused by marijuana. Therefore if it doesnt kill anyone and it is proven to have health benefits there should be no reason for it to be illegal.
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Castro Saint
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Lmao
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Kravence
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Weed is already easy to obtain arguably easier than an underage person trying to get alcohol since dealers don't ask for ID.
It's only the government that's losing out by keeping it illegal
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Castro Saint
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(Original post by Conceited)
I don't care about harm to the individual or supposed assumed or estimated guesswork at whether or not people consume cannabis. I care for individual freedoms and trusting people to make their own decisions - which is why we should legalise all drugs.
boom
drops mic
/end thread


This basic concept along with the fact drug purity can be controlled, black market/gangs can get wiped out, and all the money saved/made - it's a no brainer.
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AlwaysBroke.
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I TOTALLY AGREE.

Drugs have ruined our tiny village. The boys I used to play out with are now, lazy arrogant people whose entire lives are dedicated to nothing but sitting at the park and blasting Nines and getting high. There has been two stab-victims this year (this is ultra-rare for our town), and a minor acid attack. You can hear them on the streets at night, screaming at their girlfriends (or groups of girls) or fighting one another. Weed has destroyed our village, affected my once amazing group of friends in my neighbourhood, and has affected me too. It can be seen as dangerous to go outside sometimes, and the weed is just destroying us kids bit by bit. Most of them don't even have jobs (I am 15 at the time of writing) so I believe most kids have to get money off their parents (which is just soul-crushing) or they save up and chip for a mere 5 gram bag that costs 20-40£ to last them a couple of days, maybe a week. Its disgusting what weed has done to our community and crime IS rising. I can see all the mindless anger and frustration my mates go through sometimes and its vile to know that it affects not just themselves but their family and friends.

Only people who have never experienced the true disasters of drugs will never know how bad it can be. Legalising Drugs in Mexico will still not solve the gang crisis their. Lives are destroyed through this poison, just as alcohol can destroy lives. Sure, you can have a good time, in moderation, and maybe medicinal weed can help, but if weed goes full out legal, who knows what the consequences will be. Certainly not peaceful
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Dot.Cotton
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Amen to that - drug users are the scum of the Earth.
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Dheorl
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So out of curiosity, can you clarify your view on it being used for medical reasons.

What is you opinion on the use of opiates for medical reasons?
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username3118454
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(Original post by mc_miah)
I TOTALLY AGREE.

Drugs have ruined our tiny village. The boys I used to play out with are now, lazy arrogant people whose entire lives are dedicated to nothing but sitting at the park and blasting Nines and getting high. There has been two stab-victims this year (this is ultra-rare for our town), and a minor acid attack. You can hear them on the streets at night, screaming at their girlfriends (or groups of girls) or fighting one another. Weed has destroyed our village, affected my once amazing group of friends in my neighbourhood, and has affected me too. It can be seen as dangerous to go outside sometimes, and the weed is just destroying us kids bit by bit. Most of them don't even have jobs (I am 15 at the time of writing) so I believe most kids have to get money off their parents (which is just soul-crushing) or they save up and chip for a mere 5 gram bag that costs 20-40£ to last them a couple of days, maybe a week. Its disgusting what weed has done to our community and crime IS rising. I can see all the mindless anger and frustration my mates go through sometimes and its vile to know that it affects not just themselves but their family and friends.
Apart from the cost thing (which would be reduced after legalising) how do you know all of this is because of weed? This just sounds like typical anti-social behavior and things like acid attacks would happen with or without weed. You'd be surprised at how many people smoke it but end up leading perfectly normal lives.
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