Is it worth me doing GCSE Maths at the age of 40+?

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Dorike
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I failed GCSE maths back in 1992 (got a big fat U!) this has always bugged me somehow. I'm thinking of doing a GCSE Maths course at my local college next month, just to satisfy myself, and maybe to do a degree sometime. Has anyone gone from a U to a C or above grade?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Dorike)
I failed GCSE maths back in 1992 (got a big fat U!) this has always bugged me somehow. I'm thinking of doing a GCSE Maths course at my local college next month, just to satisfy myself, and maybe to do a degree sometime. Has anyone gone from a U to a C or above grade?
It's perfectly feasible - and who knows: with work, you might get an A*.

It's never too late to learn. And you're only 40 - you're hardly ancient history.
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S27
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Do it! I wouldn't worry your previous U as it was so long ago you are probably a different person now. If you put in the time, anyone can get a C grade.

If you want to go to university, have a look at access courses. I have taught it, and it allows people of all ages and abilities the chance to go to university quicker than you would think.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Dorike)
I failed GCSE maths back in 1992 (got a big fat U!) this has always bugged me somehow. I'm thinking of doing a GCSE Maths course at my local college next month, just to satisfy myself, and maybe to do a degree sometime. Has anyone gone from a U to a C or above grade?
Plenty of people jump from a U to a C grade. Just ask any teacher of mathematics!

It can be done.
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Ash_Rainbow
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If you were sitting the old style GCSEs (A*-C), I would 100% tell you to go for it. However, having just sat the new style GCSE exams (9-1), I can tell you from personal experience that they are really difficult. They are so much harder than the old exams.

Even so, if you study properly (eg. use the new textbooks or get some additional help from a tutor) and you feel confident enough, I'd say that it is never too late. Any qualifications are always useful and who knows what opportunities it could open up for you.

Do what your heart tells you and don't be afraid of trying
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artful_lounger
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Well, conversely, is there anything to lose by doing it now...?

If the answer to that is no, and it provides some satisfaction for yourself to pass it, there's no reason not to.

Also, don't underestimate the benefit of hindsight and maturity of character - as a young person, for most their approach to learning was fairly different to how they may approach it as an adult. Since as a school aged student you had no experience of anything but the education system, it's not unusual for them to feel some sense of "burnout" by that stage - however with experience of life comparatively and greater self discipline learned through trial and error as an adult, it's very possible you'll take things more seriously and approach the subject in a different manner.

This could well lead to you doing much better than you did before - a C is certainly plausible, and above that is very possible.
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StealingThunder
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My friend's mum did her GCSE maths again two years ago (and she's a media teacher in her 50s, so this was on top of her job and being a mum). It's totally doable if you make the time to practise. If it's something you really care about then don't be put off by the new type of GCSEs - they're meant to be harder, but it's still a GCSE that all kids in the country are meant to take (and hopefully pass).
As for going from U to a C, I've known lots of people who got Us in their mocks and then really worked to the point of almost burning out and got As and Bs. And if maths is all you're doing I don't see why it wouldn't be possible!
Best of luck to you! xx
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the bear
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it is important for older people to keep their brains active... go for it !

:shakecane:
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Quizlet
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(Original post by Dorike)
I failed GCSE maths back in 1992 (got a big fat U!) this has always bugged me somehow. I'm thinking of doing a GCSE Maths course at my local college next month, just to satisfy myself, and maybe to do a degree sometime. Has anyone gone from a U to a C or above grade?
Definitely you should do it. With hard work, there's no doubt you'll get a C+ in Maths GCSE.
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BrasenoseAdm
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(Original post by Dorike)
I failed GCSE maths back in 1992 (got a big fat U!) this has always bugged me somehow. I'm thinking of doing a GCSE Maths course at my local college next month, just to satisfy myself, and maybe to do a degree sometime. Has anyone gone from a U to a C or above grade?
We think this is absolutely possible - good luck!
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username2393237
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I know someone who took GCSE Maths at 32 and got an A*. Her original grade was a C because she had a host of family problems etc. The biggest problem for her was a fear of the subject after her experience at school, but it's amazing what a bit of confidence can do.
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Dorike
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(Original post by Reality Check)
It's perfectly feasible - and who knows: with work, you might get an A*.

It's never too late to learn. And you're only 40 - you're hardly ancient history.
Thank you! Very encouraging words
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Dorike)
Thank you! Very encouraging words
You're welcome Was studying GCSE maths a step along a path, or something you just wanted to re-do because you know you could have done better the first time round?
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Dorike
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You're welcome Was studying GCSE maths a step along a path, or something you just wanted to re-do because you know you could have done better the first time round?
Hi, I guess it's just to prove to myself that I can do it..I do have a maths phobia though. Suspiciously, a few people from my Year also got "unclassified" Hmmm. ..We did this system called "S.M.I.L.E Maths" at school. Well, i wasn't smiling when I failed, I can tell you that! Lol.

I did attempt an evening GCSE Maths course in my late teens after that, but pulled out, as they mentioned things I hadn't been taught ever before, like algebra, and pythogarous theory or something of the sort, but it was too overwhelming and difficult for me to grasp at such a speed, when everyone else around me already had a rough idea as to what the tutor was talking about - so I dropped out

I would also like to go uni someday.
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Dorike
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(Original post by Ash_Rainbow)
If you were sitting the old style GCSEs (A*-C), I would 100% tell you to go for it. However, having just sat the new style GCSE exams (9-1), I can tell you from personal experience that they are really difficult. They are so much harder than the old exams.

Even so, if you study properly (eg. use the new textbooks or get some additional help from a tutor) and you feel confident enough, I'd say that it is never too late. Any qualifications are always useful and who knows what opportunities it could open up for you.

Do what your heart tells you and don't be afraid of trying
Hi, I wish it was the old style A, B, C,.then I'd know for sure what i should have got. Thanks for the encouragement!
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Dorike)
Hi, I guess it's just to prove to myself that I can do it..I do have a maths phobia though. Suspiciously, a few people from my Year also got "unclassified" Hmmm. ..We did this system called "S.M.I.L.E Maths" at school. Well, i wasn't smiling when I failed, I can tell you that! Lol.

I did attempt an evening GCSE Maths course in my late teens after that, but pulled out, as they mentioned things I hadn't been taught ever before, like algebra, and pythogarous theory or something of the sort, but it was too overwhelming and difficult for me to grasp at such a speed, when everyone else around me already had a rough idea as to what the tutor was talking about - so I dropped out

I would also like to go uni someday.
Ooh, SMILE mathematics :moon: - I haven't heard of that for absolutely yonks!

I'm so pleased to read this and I'm entirely rooting for you. It takes a lot of drive and motivation to go back to study after an extended break from it, and even more so when there is no obvious need to do so, i.e. you're doing it entirely because you want to. Use all the resources on TSR for maths - there's a huge amount of them, and very dedicated and knowledgeable regular posters who will be happy to help you with any question, big or small.
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Just a Bloke
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Forget how child-you once achieved. With a wizened man's work ethic, I dare say that you should be aiming for a B or A! Go for it.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Just a Bloke)
Forget how child-you once achieved. With a wizened man's work ethic, I dare say that you should be aiming for a B or A! Go for it.
:shakecane: = A*
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Purdy7
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Some of my mates at College did their maths this year, and I'm doing mine from September. Both English Language and Maths are called for by most employers these days, so take the course. A lot of us were older then 20s, most in our 30s and some a lot older.

We all get our results on Thursday - nail biting wait.
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Dorike
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(Original post by Purdy7)
Some of my mates at College did their maths this year, and I'm doing mine from September. Both English Language and Maths are called for by most employers these days, so take the course. A lot of us were older then 20s, most in our 30s and some a lot older.

We all get our results on Thursday - nail biting wait.
Hi Purdy,

That's encouraging! I've already got my GCSE's in English Language and English Literature - both C's first time when I was 15. So, it's just the maths which is haunting me now lol.
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