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'academic' A level subjects for oxbridge/LSE watch

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    (Original post by W.A.S Hewins)
    I haven't had the time to check it out, but if this is true it's very funny: the School teaches everything single one of these subjects..
    The problem isn't the subjects themselves but the A-levels. For example: To cover a subject as vast as Law, the A-level is vastly simplified, often glossing over more complex parts. Therefore many universities (including LSE) consider it less relevent than something like History or English Literature.
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    (Original post by W.A.S Hewins)
    I haven't had the time to check it out, but if this is true it's very funny: the School teaches everything single one of these subjects..
    The full list is in the front section of the UG prospectus.

    It does emphasise, however, that one of the these subjects along with two other 'academic' A-Levels is fine. But, with that said, I know a few people who have just got in with a couple of the above subjects (and, yes, I did media and citizenship a/s!)

    Finally, it's nothing to do with LSE teaching those subjects at degree level, it's just a reflection on those particular courses at A-Level. It can be quite controversial on these forums; but I have always thought that my Maths and Physics courses were much harder than the social sciences that I did. So, I fully understand why LSE adopt this policy.
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    (Original post by pinkegokane)
    of course i read what you said (languages have "less to offer").
    Yes, but I meant that Spanish has less to offer to a history/politics degree than English Lit, only marginally though.

    actually language A-Level is not just based on the ability to speak the language. as part of my ocr course i had to be proficient in reading, writing and listening as well as speaking. it's not a skill, it's as much about learning (e.g. vocabulary), understanding and applying (e.g. grammar) as any other so-called academic subject. i did a paper on culture as well (in spanish) which naturally required me to know a fair amount about the country's history, politics, economics etc. and as the literature element was an integral part, it can't be excluded. if this isn't academic then what exactly is?
    I know that Modern Foreign Language A-levels are about more than just ability to speak read and write the language (hence why I mentioned literature).

    Of course language ability is a skill. You still have to learn and develop skills. Indeed people refer to their language skills all the time, be it foreign or first languages.

    I think we are talking a little and cross purposes. Its slightly less academic than History because a fair part of the course is learning something of great practical use (a second, third, fourth language). The literature /culture part is academic, yes, but the 'Language' element isn't. This isn't a bad thing at all. Too much emphasis is placed on Academia.

    Sorry if it seemed I was belittling Languages, I'm really not - they very important and I wish my language skills were better.
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    (Original post by Pegasus)
    The problem isn't the subjects themselves but the A-levels. For example: To cover a subject as vast as Law, the A-level is vastly simplified, often glossing over more complex parts. Therefore many universities (including LSE) consider it less relevent than something like History or English Literature.
    But thats the same with all subjects to an extent. I mean what larger subject could there be than History?
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    (Original post by Catt)
    But thats the same with all subjects to an extent. I mean what larger subject could there be than History?
    Government and politics and philosohpy?
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    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    Government and politics and philosohpy?
    yes, but these are all part of history and can legitamately be studied under the heading of 'History'. My point being that all A-Level subjects are necessarily pared down versions of the the whole subject as a potential field of study.
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    (Original post by Catt)
    yes, but these are all part of history and can legitamately be studied under the heading of 'History'. My point being that all A-Level subjects are necessarily pared down versions of the the whole subject as a potential field of study.
    Your agument would mean that everything is history :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by tomhitchings)
    The full list is in the front section of the UG prospectus.

    It does emphasise, however, that one of the these subjects along with two other 'academic' A-Levels is fine. But, with that said, I know a few people who have just got in with a couple of the above subjects (and, yes, I did media and citizenship a/s!)

    .
    is politics an academic subject:confused:
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    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    Your agument would mean that everything is history :rolleyes:
    yes, yes it does
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    (Original post by tomhitchings)
    The full list is in the front section of the UG prospectus.

    It does emphasise, however, that one of the these subjects along with two other 'academic' A-Levels is fine. But, with that said, I know a few people who have just got in with a couple of the above subjects (and, yes, I did media and citizenship a/s!)

    Finally, it's nothing to do with LSE teaching those subjects at degree level, it's just a reflection on those particular courses at A-Level. It can be quite controversial on these forums; but I have always thought that my Maths and Physics courses were much harder than the social sciences that I did. So, I fully understand why LSE adopt this policy.
    I still think it's very ironic, even arrogant. For that matter, if anyone believes that A Level Eng Lit (which currently is all about poilitically correct race/gender interpretations of basic literature) or History are harder than A Level Sociology they live in a fantasy world: at least with subjects like Sociology students are expected to deal with some quite complex theory. You can get very high marks in English simply by memorising plots and quotes and applying the standard feminist interpretations.

    I'm the first to defend LSE, but this is potentially explosive, especially as the subjects concerned are often at A Level formulated in close consultation with university academics.
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    (Original post by W.A.S Hewins)
    I still think it's very ironic, even arrogant. For that matter, if anyone believes that A Level Eng Lit (which currently is all about poilitically correct race/gender interpretations of basic literature) or History are harder than A Level Sociology they live in a fantasy world: at least with subjects like Sociology students are expected to deal with some quite complex theory.
    I agree
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    is politics an academic subject:confused:
    Why shouldn't it be if history is with it and English is as well?
 
 
 
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