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    Go for it fam.
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    so what is your name
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    Hi, what year are you in? Do you have any tips for medical school interviews?
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    (Original post by iras)
    so what is your name
    Uvuvweveve Onyentuvweveve Ubwemubwem Osas.
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    (Original post by coco.z)
    Hi, what year are you in? Do you have any tips for medical school interviews?
    Going onto my 2nd year in October. Tips for Cambridge medical interview or tips for every other schools interviews? They are insanely different.
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    (Original post by Immunology)
    Going onto my 2nd year in October. Tips for Cambridge medical interview or tips for every other schools interviews? They are insanely different.
    Both please what are their differences?
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    (Original post by coco.z)
    Both please what are their differences?
    I'll start off with Cambridge - Cambridge don't really care about things like why you applied for medicine and what makes you different to everyone else (although they will ask you these questions). They care more about how you think, what your scientific mind is like. Cambridge are going to ask you questions to do with science that you will probably not know the answer to, and they don't expect you to get the answer. However, they do expect you to use your knowledge which you've acquired through your life to at least come to some sort of conclusion. They'll ask you some mini questions which you should know the answer to to get towards the answer of the big question if that makes sense.

    MMI interviews which occur in some universities were my favorite. You get a varying amount of stations with a limited time period and in that time your simple task is to impress the person who's hosting the station. It'll have some role plays, some scenarios and some standard medical questions. Best thing about an MMI is if you screw up one station, you normally have a lot of other stations to redeem yourself without having to worry about the person judging you because of one of your previous answers.

    Finally, a normal traditional interview. Mine focused more on what was going on in the news at the time and why I wanted to do medicine, stuff like that. They mainly stick away from the science and want to interview what you are like as a person.

    My advice - focus on some questions. There was a medicine interview question book I used that can help a lot with questions that may be asked. Interviews are a fun experience, try not to worry about them.
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    (Original post by Immunology)
    I'll start off with Cambridge - Cambridge don't really care about things like why you applied for medicine and what makes you different to everyone else (although they will ask you these questions). They care more about how you think, what your scientific mind is like. Cambridge are going to ask you questions to do with science that you will probably not know the answer to, and they don't expect you to get the answer. However, they do expect you to use your knowledge which you've acquired through your life to at least come to some sort of conclusion. They'll ask you some mini questions which you should know the answer to to get towards the answer of the big question if that makes sense.

    MMI interviews which occur in some universities were my favorite. You get a varying amount of stations with a limited time period and in that time your simple task is to impress the person who's hosting the station. It'll have some role plays, some scenarios and some standard medical questions. Best thing about an MMI is if you screw up one station, you normally have a lot of other stations to redeem yourself without having to worry about the person judging you because of one of your previous answers.

    Finally, a normal traditional interview. Mine focused more on what was going on in the news at the time and why I wanted to do medicine, stuff like that. They mainly stick away from the science and want to interview what you are like as a person.

    My advice - focus on some questions. There was a medicine interview question book I used that can help a lot with questions that may be asked. Interviews are a fun experience, try not to worry about them.
    Any idea what you're going to study in your 3rd year as part of the intercalated degree? (If that's the correct term?) Just curious
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    (Original post by Mac117)
    Any idea what you're going to study in your 3rd year as part of the intercalated degree? (If that's the correct term?) Just curious
    It is the correct term! To be honest, was kind of thinking Psychology. I do like some of the controversial studies that have been done in the world of Psychology such as the Stanford Prison Experiment so I was thinking I could do a dissertation based on that. To be honest with you, at this moment in time, I have no idea how the 3rd year works anyway lmao
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    What other universities did you apply for and did you get interviews/offers from them?
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    What were your GCSE and A-Level results? I heard that Cambridge doesn't give a darn about GCSEs (well they want at least a C at GCSE apparently) I want to do engineering/computer science at Cambridge but I like a college that has: free wifi, looks modern and has good facilities etc. know any colleges that meet my needs?
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    (Original post by Immunology)
    It is the correct term! To be honest, was kind of thinking Psychology. I do like some of the controversial studies that have been done in the world of Psychology such as the Stanford Prison Experiment so I was thinking I could do a dissertation based on that. To be honest with you, at this moment in time, I have no idea how the 3rd year works anyway lmao
    That's so interesting! I was planning on doing psychology as well should I be lucky enough to get an offer (2018 entry applicant here). Do you think there's a disadvantage for those choosing psychology/non-purely-science degrees as compared to those who choose pharmacology? It's not considered something "lesser", is it? I was told that some prefer when a person does purely medical-related degrees but I don't think that's true...
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    (Original post by Mac117)
    That's so interesting! I was planning on doing psychology as well should I be lucky enough to get an offer (2018 entry applicant here). Do you think there's a disadvantage for those choosing psychology/non-purely-science degrees as compared to those who choose pharmacology? It's not considered something "lesser", is it? I was told that some prefer when a person does purely medical-related degrees but I don't think that's true...
    One thing about Cambridge is no one is going to think less of you - just another stereotype which isn't true. I'm 95% sure that there is no disadvantage to choosing a non-medical degree. I know people who did engineering which is the complete opposite of medicine. The brilliance of the third year is that it exists as to allow you to do something else you are interested in and want to do - not something someone else wants you to do. Although, going to be real with you, psychology is considered a subject where you can chill out a little as there aren't that many lectures. No one really cares though because the first 2 years of Cambridge are the toughest years of your life according to some!
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    (Original post by Immunology)
    The brilliance of the third year is that it exists as to allow you to do something else you are interested in and want to do - not something someone else wants you to do.
    I heard they were becoming more strict about people doing completely unrelated things though.
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    (Original post by Immunology)
    I'll start off with Cambridge - Cambridge don't really care about things like why you applied for medicine and what makes you different to everyone else (although they will ask you these questions). They care more about how you think, what your scientific mind is like. Cambridge are going to ask you questions to do with science that you will probably not know the answer to, and they don't expect you to get the answer. However, they do expect you to use your knowledge which you've acquired through your life to at least come to some sort of conclusion. They'll ask you some mini questions which you should know the answer to to get towards the answer of the big question if that makes sense.

    MMI interviews which occur in some universities were my favorite. You get a varying amount of stations with a limited time period and in that time your simple task is to impress the person who's hosting the station. It'll have some role plays, some scenarios and some standard medical questions. Best thing about an MMI is if you screw up one station, you normally have a lot of other stations to redeem yourself without having to worry about the person judging you because of one of your previous answers.

    Finally, a normal traditional interview. Mine focused more on what was going on in the news at the time and why I wanted to do medicine, stuff like that. They mainly stick away from the science and want to interview what you are like as a person.

    My advice - focus on some questions. There was a medicine interview question book I used that can help a lot with questions that may be asked. Interviews are a fun experience, try not to worry about them.
    Just to clarify, was Cambridge's interview process a traditional interview or MMI?

    Cheers!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I heard they were becoming more strict about people doing completely unrelated things though.
    Basically, each college has a director of studies who leads the medical course and you have to go through them when you choose the course you want to do in you 3rd year. Some of these director of studies allow you to go completely off medicine and don't give a crap, some will give a crap and tell you to do whatever you want as long as you enjoy it. Either way, you can pretty much make a case if you want to do a course that you're passionate about and odd's are the director will say you can do it.
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    (Original post by Amy815)
    Just to clarify, was Cambridge's interview process a traditional interview or MMI?

    Cheers!
    I like to call it a traditional interview with a twist - the twist is explained above.
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    Is it worth reapplying for Cambridge medicine having achieved A*A*A*A given that I was reject last year without an interview? I'm kind of scared of being rejected pre-interview again
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    Just got my AS results and got 266/300. Any idea if thats up to scratch for Cambridge? I am looking at Oxbridge because I love the look of the tutorial system. Given I am not averaging 95+ UMS, and that I have strong GCSE's, should I sway more towards Oxford.

    Thanks for any insight.
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    (Original post by Stegosaurus99)
    Just got my AS results and got 266/300. Any idea if thats up to scratch for Cambridge? I am looking at Oxbridge because I love the look of the tutorial system. Given I am not averaging 95+ UMS, and that I have strong GCSE's, should I sway more towards Oxford.

    Thanks for any insight.
    Sway towards Oxford, you got around 89% UMS and I'd say get at least 90% for Cambridge. Especially since you have strong GCSE's, you should definitely get an interview from them. Congrats on your AS results!
 
 
 
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