biomedical engineering at UCL or medicine in Czech Republic

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anonymo007
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Can anyone give me advice on whether to study biomedical engineering at UCL or medicine in Prague, Czech Republic, please?
Any opinions, experience, or even personal attitudes towards any of these institutions and their departments would be much appreciated.

My initial desire was to be a doctor, so I have applied to many medical schools in the UK. Unfortunately, I was rejected post-interview by some of them.

Nevertheless, I managed to get some offers to study medicine at Charles University first faculty of medicine in Prague and biomedical engineering at UCL.

Personally, anything will do for me and I cannot really say which one is better overall when taking everything into consideration. That's why I cannot decide. I know both options are great, but I have to decide soon since they will start their courses this September.

Needless to say, medicine seems to be, of course, very challenging and rewarding course to persue. But biomedical engineering is a new trendy course with high potential. I mean although it is brand-new, it looks really interesting.

In terms of the future careers, I mean we all know that doctors would hardly lose their jobs. However, there is uncertainty in biomedical engineering. I don't know whether what I said is true since my parents are not biomedical engineers. They are civil engineers. Some people say that biomedical engineers cannot really find a good place to work after graduating from this degre,e whereas others tend to say the opposite. That's what makes me confused.

Regarding ranking, UCL is more well-known.

To be honest, I don't have any particular most-hatred subject at school. (I did four A-level subjects; bio, chem, phys, and math) I may don't like math when you reach the most difficult part like integrating, but I don't mind studying it. My mom, who is a civil engineer, says once I get used to it, it is going to be ok. But I'm not sure about this. Physics is not really my favourite, but if you combine it with practical purpose like in biomedical engineering, it sounds like magic!

I kind of like biology because no numerical values are required although the memorizing part can be a bit too much and boring sometimes. Overall, biology is probably my favourite one. From what I understand, when you get to the more practical bit like in medicine, the understanding of human body will be of great use. I guess that it will be a lot more fun when you know how to treat someone in real life, but you cannot deny to learn the basic first.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by anonymo007)
Can anyone give me advice on whether to study biomedical engineering at UCL or medicine in Prague, Czech Republic, please?

My initial desire was to be a doctor, so I have applied to many medical schools in the UK. Unfortunately, I was rejected post-interview by some of them.

Nevertheless, I managed to get some offers to study medicine at Charles University first faculty of medicine in Prague and biomedical engineering at UCL.

Personally, anything will do for me and I cannot really say which one is better overall when taking everything into consideration. That's why I cannot decide. I know both options are great, but I have to decide soon since they will start their courses this September.

Needless to say, medicine seems to be, of course, very challenging and rewarding course to persue. But biomedical engineering is a new trendy course with high potential. I mean although it is brand-new, it looks really interesting.

In terms of the future careers, I mean we all know that doctors would hardly lose their jobs. However, there is uncertainty in biomedical engineering. I don't know whether what I said is true since my parents are not biomedical engineers. They are civil engineers. Some people say that biomedical engineers cannot really find a good place to work after graduating from this degre,e whereas others tend to say the opposite. That's what makes me confused.

Regarding ranking, UCL is more well-known.

To be honest, I don't have any particular most-hatred subject at school. (I did four A-level subjects; bio, chem, phys, and math) I may don't like math when you reach the most difficult part like integrating, but I don't mind studying it. My mom, who is a civil engineer, says once I get used to it, it is going to be ok. But I'm not sure about this. Physics is not really my favourite, but if you combine it with practical purpose like in biomedical engineering, it sounds like magic! I kind of like biology because no numerical values are required although the memorizing part can be a bit too much and boring sometimes. Overall, biology is probably my favourite one. From what I understand, when you get to the more practical bit like in medicine, the understanding of human body will be of great use. I guess that it will be a lot more fun when you know how to treat someone in real life, but you cannot deny to learn the basic first.
Although I agree that having a medical sciences background will be good for Graduate Medicine, I know people that have come from non-traditional backgrounds into Medicine.

My friend went from an Engineering programme (1st class) at Imperial to Graduate Medicine at Cambridge. He said it was difficult adjusting to it, but it was worthwhile.

I think you should stick with UCL Biomed engineering. UCL's medicine programme is one of the best in the world and you may get bits of it through the bio-med course (i may be wrong).

Even the UCL is strong, especially if you want to proceed to Graduate medicine programmes.

My advise would be to stick with UCL, work hard to get a First, then apply for Graduate programmes. You should also be padding your CV with the relevant medical experience.

All the best.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by anonymo007)
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This isn't even something worth discussing! Do you want to be a doctor or not? Bear in mind that this is a lifelong profession so just doing the degree will not be enough. You will need to carry on studying pretty much for the rest of your life. If not then yes by all means consider biomed engineering. Also bear in mind though that jobs aren't going to just land in your lap because you have a degree. You will be as employable as you make yourself and may need additional quals to progress.
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anonymo007
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
Although I agree that having a medical sciences background will be good for Graduate Medicine, I know people that have come from non-traditional backgrounds into Medicine.

My friend went from an Engineering programme (1st class) at Imperial to Graduate Medicine at Cambridge. He said it was difficult adjusting to it, but it was worthwhile.

I think you should stick with UCL Biomed engineering. UCL's medicine programme is one of the best in the world and you may get bits of it through the bio-med course (i may be wrong).

Even the UCL is strong, especially if you want to proceed to Graduate medicine programmes.

My advise would be to stick with UCL, work hard to get a First, then apply for Graduate programmes. You should also be padding your CV with the relevant medical experience.

All the best.
Thank you so much. You replied me in just a few seconds.))
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by anonymo007)
Thank you so much. You replied me in just a few seconds.))
All the best.
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anonymo007
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(Original post by alleycat393)
This isn't even something worth discussing! Do you want to be a doctor or not? Bear in mind that this is a lifelong profession so just doing the degree will not be enough. You will need to carry on studying pretty much for the rest of your life. If not then yes by all means consider biomed engineering. Also bear in mind though that jobs aren't going to just land in your lap because you have a degree. You will be as employable as you make yourself and may need additional quals to progress.
Thank you for your reply.
In fact I want to be both, but that's a bit far impossible. Yes, you are right, I should thinking about it more thoroughly.^^
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