fairylight
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ok so its BBB, number 7 in the league tables and a really prestigious university...BUT ITS IN SCOTLAND ARGH! (im in the midlands atm!)

any idea about whether Law LLB in scotland is any different to it in england?
will it have an effect when i move back down to apply for jobs?

opinions would be really appreciated!
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lilcathstar
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I'm by no means an expert on this, but I believe it's Scottish law that is studied at Edinburgh, and has some subtle differences to the English system. And so therefore I think a conversion course is needed after graduation to enable you to practice in the rest of the UK. Obviously don't take my word for it, but it's definitely worth looking into this and doing your research. That said, there are a lot of English folk doing law here, so maybe it isn't too much of a hinderance
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Terrafire
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I believe the conversion course involves merely taking a relatively trivial exam on some aspects of English Law, although I could be wrong. Certainly it's not particularly difficult to convert, from what I hear.
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NicLeys
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(Original post by fairylight)
ok so its BBB, number 7 in the league tables and a really prestigious university...BUT ITS IN SCOTLAND ARGH! (im in the midlands atm!)

any idea about whether Law LLB in scotland is any different to it in england?
will it have an effect when i move back down to apply for jobs?

opinions would be really appreciated!
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

BBB - No. Of the (few) English students at the Law School, most have AAB or AAA. Or are PG's on an accelerated course.

Scotland - According to the tables Aberdeen is rated as better than Edinburgh. But of you want to come to Scotland to study Law but without the trouble of converting to the English Legal System, then Dundee offer an English Law degree.
If you like Edinburgh have you thought about a non-Law degree followed by CPE?
Also, at Edinburgh we have very little flexibility in the first two years of study.

Scots LLB - Yes it's different. We study for four years, plus a PG year for the DipLP, then two years of a traineeship with a Firm. The actual content also differs due to the divergence in legal systems. So it would affect applying for jobs, and a longer period of study. Differences worth noting - Civil Law, Delict etc.

Hope this helps! If you want to know more about Edinburgh feel free to contact me. Good luck!
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michaelnicholson88
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(Original post by NicLeys)
BBB - No. Of the (few) English students at the Law School, most have AAB or AAA. Or are PG's on an accelerated course.

Scotland - According to the tables Aberdeen is rated as better than Edinburgh. But of you want to come to Scotland to study Law but without the trouble of converting to the English Legal System, then Dundee offer an English Law degree.
If you like Edinburgh have you thought about a non-Law degree followed by CPE?
Also, at Edinburgh we have very little flexibility in the first two years of study.

Scots LLB - Yes it's different. We study for four years, plus a PG year for the DipLP, then two years of a traineeship with a Firm. The actual content also differs due to the divergence in legal systems. So it would affect applying for jobs, and a longer period of study. Differences worth noting - Civil Law, Delict etc.

Hope this helps! If you want to know more about Edinburgh feel free to contact me. Good luck!
Though, to be fair, that has a lot to do with a bunch of massively whiney students complaining about student satisfaction, which is a subjective test (God I've been studying law too long). Academically speaking, Edinburgh still beats Aberdeen in the tables.
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NicLeys
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(Original post by michaelnicholson88)
Though, to be fair, that has a lot to do with a bunch of massively whiney students complaining about student satisfaction, which is a subjective test (God I've been studying law too long). Academically speaking, Edinburgh still beats Aberdeen in the tables.
Of course we do! Edinburgh is awesome

Lol. More than anything I was poking fun at the tables. But on the student satisfaction note things could be better, I mean, you are studying EC with the tyrant this year aren't you?
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michaelnicholson88
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Indeed I am. But I've not got so much of a problem with the student satisfaction stuff- at least they do listen to us, which is more than can be said in other departments. Last year, for PLUS we complained bitterly about the quality of Wilson Finnie's lectures and tutorials; this year, he was dropped from PLAIR.

So yeah, sometimes it sucks, but it is getting better.
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L i b
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(Original post by michaelnicholson88)
Though, to be fair, that has a lot to do with a bunch of massively whiney students complaining about student satisfaction, which is a subjective test (God I've been studying law too long). Academically speaking, Edinburgh still beats Aberdeen in the tables.
Yeah, that seems to be happening with a lot of university and course league tables these days.
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NicLeys
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(Original post by michaelnicholson88)
Indeed I am. But I've not got so much of a problem with the student satisfaction stuff- at least they do listen to us, which is more than can be said in other departments. Last year, for PLUS we complained bitterly about the quality of Wilson Finnie's lectures and tutorials; this year, he was dropped from PLAIR.

So yeah, sometimes it sucks, but it is getting better.
Yeah, I've seen an improvement since first year. Some lecturers though aren't as responsive.

Finnie was dropped from all his Honours courses too, he is, ahem, no longer with us. I had him as a tutor for PLUS and he was terrible.

What went wrong with the Plus exam? I saw the huge forum page of complaints last year!
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michaelnicholson88
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Basically, we'd been led to believe the whole time that we'd be doing three questions from 7, two of which would be OR questions- so basically 3 out of 9. There was no definite authority for this but the course guide simply told us to go by past papers, where this was the format. Instead we got 3 out of 6 with no OR questions. It threw a lot of us, so we complained and the debate was more about the way it was dimissed so offhandly by the lecturers than the format, though that seriously pissed me off.
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NicLeys
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Yeah I saw the rants on the forum and justly so! At least some corrective action was taken after in light of criticisms though.
Last year we petitioned Jo Shaw about the quality and taught form of the EC course, thankfully some changes were made too.

I have no idea why they even split Public law in the first place either, madness.
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michaelnicholson88
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The layout has always confused me. I've always thought LRLS should be two separate courses, with Legal Reasoning maybe joining up with Jurisprudence and Legal System with Public Law or the EC Institutional stuff. That way all the subjects could get taught but in a less congested fashion than they currently are. The first semester should really be about institutions before we even touch any substantive stuff. Perhaps Public Law, Legal System and Legal Reasoning in the first semester, then moving on to Contract, Family and Delict in the second. I know I'd have been happier with that.
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username4336288
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I was a student on the Llb course at Edinburgh and agree that Wilson Finnie was useless. Really bad. However it is a credible degree and it is relatively easy to convert.
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username4336288
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Good credible degree the Llb and conversion is relatively easy. One of the top UK unis. But check that Wilson Finnie the public law lecturer and alleged tutor remains err dropped from his courses as he lets down an otherwise excellent law faculty at Old College. Finnie has caused students no end of issues and is really poor.
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Andy749
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#15
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Wilson Finnie was a very able academic and he is also a very decent human being. I wish him well in whatever is is now doing. Wilson was a very misunderstood man. Slightly underneath his his somewhat antisocial exterior was a very warm and lovely person. I saw that side of him and I am therefore in a position to testify that he is a good guy without a doubt.
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jr74925681
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I totally agree. When you got to know Wilson it became apparent that he was a highly intelligent and decent person. Unlike a few others in that pathological personality disorder ridden place, known as the Department of Law at Old College, Edinburgh.
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