USA university scholarships

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Lil21
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Hi,
So I'm 16 (starting a levels) and I'm interested in studying for an undergraduate degree in the USA (or possibly Canada). I'm not too sure about how it works but I was wondering if there's anything I can do now that would help a scholarship application?
Thankyou!
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luq_ali
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Great question! What really helped me, when I was your age, to get ahead in the looking for scholarships, was doing well enough on my standardized exams, that in many cases, I had various colleges contacting me with scholarship offers-without my having to "look." (You can't go wrong with the SAT, but the ACT is still highly popular, particularly in the Midwest (University of Michigan, for example), too. So it is really a good way, to put yourself, long before you have your final scores, in that path. As I've mentioned a few times on this site, the proper preparation for the standardized exams, is critically important, and that includes some very straightforward test taking skills and proper simulating, as close as you can, the test taking environment of the exams. (taking practice exams with the identical time constraints, and some people even train to the point of giving themselves a little less time, so that during the actual exam, they feel even more comfortable.)

Another important step will be college/university fairs, where schools from the U.S. and Canada perhaps will come to your country-particularly in the UK-looking for international students and students with certain test scores. I was going to some university fairs and getting scholarships on the spot, and after I did very well on my scores, which was a blessing from The Most High, for sure, as I said before-the schools were contacting me, including many programs I had not heard of before from small, medium institutions. I had a full scholarship offer to Boston University for engineering, just based upon my test scores, for example. (as I recall, there is a selection to make to directly authorize the release of your scores to universities and colleges, so just double check, and if that is the case, make sure you do that, because the programs will be contacting you directly)

(Original post by Lil21)
Hi,
So I'm 16 (starting a levels) and I'm interested in studying for an undergraduate degree in the USA (or possibly Canada). I'm not too sure about how it works but I was wondering if there's anything I can do now that would help a scholarship application?
Thankyou!
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hc!
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(Original post by luq_ali)
Great question! What really helped me, when I was your age, to get ahead in the looking for scholarships, was doing well enough on my standardized exams, that in many cases, I had various colleges contacting me with scholarship offers-without my having to "look." (You can't go wrong with the SAT, but the ACT is still highly popular, particularly in the Midwest (University of Michigan, for example), too. So it is really a good way, to put yourself, long before you have your final scores, in that path. As I've mentioned a few times on this site, the proper preparation for the standardized exams, is critically important, and that includes some very straightforward test taking skills and proper simulating, as close as you can, the test taking environment of the exams. (taking practice exams with the identical time constraints, and some people even train to the point of giving themselves a little less time, so that during the actual exam, they feel even more comfortable.)

Another important step will be college/university fairs, where schools from the U.S. and Canada perhaps will come to your country-particularly in the UK-looking for international students and students with certain test scores. I was going to some university fairs and getting scholarships on the spot, and after I did very well on my scores, which was a blessing from The Most High, for sure, as I said before-the schools were contacting me, including many programs I had not heard of before from small, medium institutions. I had a full scholarship offer to Boston University for engineering, just based upon my test scores, for example. (as I recall, there is a selection to make to directly authorize the release of your scores to universities and colleges, so just double check, and if that is the case, make sure you do that, because the programs will be contacting you directly)
What a level grades do you think I should get to be able to get a lot of financial aid at less competitive schools with a 50% acceptance rate?
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Lil21
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(Original post by luq_ali)
Great question! What really helped me, when I was your age, to get ahead in the looking for scholarships, was doing well enough on my standardized exams, that in many cases, I had various colleges contacting me with scholarship offers-without my having to "look." (You can't go wrong with the SAT, but the ACT is still highly popular, particularly in the Midwest (University of Michigan, for example), too. So it is really a good way, to put yourself, long before you have your final scores, in that path. As I've mentioned a few times on this site, the proper preparation for the standardized exams, is critically important, and that includes some very straightforward test taking skills and proper simulating, as close as you can, the test taking environment of the exams. (taking practice exams with the identical time constraints, and some people even train to the point of giving themselves a little less time, so that during the actual exam, they feel even more comfortable.)

Another important step will be college/university fairs, where schools from the U.S. and Canada perhaps will come to your country-particularly in the UK-looking for international students and students with certain test scores. I was going to some university fairs and getting scholarships on the spot, and after I did very well on my scores, which was a blessing from The Most High, for sure, as I said before-the schools were contacting me, including many programs I had not heard of before from small, medium institutions. I had a full scholarship offer to Boston University for engineering, just based upon my test scores, for example. (as I recall, there is a selection to make to directly authorize the release of your scores to universities and colleges, so just double check, and if that is the case, make sure you do that, because the programs will be contacting you directly)
Wow thankyou so much, this is really helpful, I didn't know about the SAT or ACT - I'll start preparing! 😊
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luq_ali
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Thanks for your question. I think, the most critical thing for such programs is the type of financial aid you are seeking.(grants and loans, as opposed to scholarships/ellowships) Having good grades will most certainly gain you admission to many of the lesser competitive schools with the acceptance rate you indicated. BUT, you will be in direct competition with those with the highest marks. Put it this way, for every top student who goes to say Harvard, Yale, Princeton, (or in the UK, Cambridge, Oxford, UCL, King's, etc.), they will NOT all be getting the full scholarships.)

Top students and very good level students sometimes will end up going to the less competitive programs because they are being given everything (full tuition, full housing costs, labs, fees, books, sometimes a stipend,etc.) whereas, at the top schools, a very good candidate might get some partialscholarship assistance, but the top students are getting the full scholarships at the most selective schools.

However, in the United States, there can be a great equalizer, and sometimes, even a greater advantage in the standardized test scores. Take a good student, who makes all B's or merit level. Bu that good student has a top ten 10% test score, he or she can then largely stand on the equal footing with the very good student, who has very good test scores, just maybe not quite that high. Additionally, the very good student(and this is just an example) with a top ten % test score, who did absolutely nothing else, no extra-curricular activities, no community involvement, well, weigh that against the good student who has measures of all of those things, perhaps had hardships, or has some unusual background(a good example is someone whose parents served in some position or job that had them moving all around the world, but there are many others)-may very well be ranked above the person with better grades and the same score. So the critical thing to getting money at the lesser competitive schools-potential scholarships (as opposed to traditional debts) will be how well you do on the SAT, PSAT, or ACT-whatever the case may be. So that to me, is the most critical part for schools that are not the most competitive-high test scores, good student level-not superb, not very good(but obviously, the more the merrier!).


(Original post by hc!)
What a level grades do you think I should get to be able to get a lot of financial aid at less competitive schools with a 50% acceptance rate?
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hc!
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(Original post by luq_ali)
Thanks for your question. I think, the most critical thing for such programs is the type of financial aid you are seeking.(grants and loans, as opposed to scholarships/ellowships) Having good grades will most certainly gain you admission to many of the lesser competitive schools with the acceptance rate you indicated. BUT, you will be in direct competition with those with the highest marks. Put it this way, for every top student who goes to say Harvard, Yale, Princeton, (or in the UK, Cambridge, Oxford, UCL, King's, etc.), they will NOT all be getting the full scholarships.)

Top students and very good level students sometimes will end up going to the less competitive programs because they are being given everything (full tuition, full housing costs, labs, fees, books, sometimes a stipend,etc.) whereas, at the top schools, a very good candidate might get some partialscholarship assistance, but the top students are getting the full scholarships at the most selective schools.

However, in the United States, there can be a great equalizer, and sometimes, even a greater advantage in the standardized test scores. Take a good student, who makes all B's or merit level. Bu that good student has a top ten 10% test score, he or she can then largely stand on the equal footing with the very good student, who has very good test scores, just maybe not quite that high. Additionally, the very good student(and this is just an example) with a top ten % test score, who did absolutely nothing else, no extra-curricular activities, no community involvement, well, weigh that against the good student who has measures of all of those things, perhaps had hardships, or has some unusual background(a good example is someone whose parents served in some position or job that had them moving all around the world, but there are many others)-may very well be ranked above the person with better grades and the same score. So the critical thing to getting money at the lesser competitive schools-potential scholarships (as opposed to traditional debts) will be how well you do on the SAT, PSAT, or ACT-whatever the case may be. So that to me, is the most critical part for schools that are not the most competitive-high test scores, good student level-not superb, not very good(but obviously, the more the merrier!).
Thanks for the response! I will be taking SATs in october! I didn't do very well on my AS level exams so I am aiming to get a very good score! thanks again
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luq_ali
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You are most welcome and best wishes to you in your preparation and study for the SAT, I am confident you will do very well.
(Original post by hc!)
Thanks for the response! I will be taking SATs in october! I didn't do very well on my AS level exams so I am aiming to get a very good score! thanks again
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