gigglefits
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I didn't get the grade I needed to get into uni.
I applied on to an access course lvl 3 into health science (equivalent to 3 alevels) at college as a back up. I have a place on this course.
Now that clearing is in the air, I'm being told left right and center that it might be worth ditching the access course for biomed/ clin sci and then transferring after the first year.
I don't feel like that's secure but this was my resit year. The decisions I have made have turned out badly for me and I'm doubting my own judgment.
I just want to know from anyone else's experience, which would be the better option.
I feel as though they're both basically exactly the same as in they have the same purpose- for me to get onto my degree of choice. But I feel as though the access course is more stable and it costs like £6000 less.
I want to know the advantages of completing the first year as a foundation degree over doing the access course.
Thanks
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claireestelle
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(Original post by gigglefits)
I didn't get the grade I needed to get into uni.
I applied on to an access course lvl 3 into health science (equivalent to 3 alevels) at college as a back up. I have a place on this course.
Now that clearing is in the air, I'm being told left right and center that it might be worth ditching the access course for biomed/ clin sci and then transferring after the first year.
I don't feel like that's secure but this was my resit year. The decisions I have made have turned out badly for me and I'm doubting my own judgment.
I just want to know from anyone else's experience, which would be the better option.
I feel as though they're both basically exactly the same as in they have the same purpose- for me to get onto my degree of choice. But I feel as though the access course is more stable and it costs like £6000 less.
I want to know the advantages of completing the first year as a foundation degree over doing the access course.
Thanks
foundation years would be better preparation as it specifically perhaps you for university study and it would be very unlikely you'd ever pay your whole student debt back anyway.
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Alzata
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(Original post by gigglefits)
I didn't get the grade I needed to get into uni.
I applied on to an access course lvl 3 into health science (equivalent to 3 alevels) at college as a back up. I have a place on this course.
Now that clearing is in the air, I'm being told left right and center that it might be worth ditching the access course for biomed/ clin sci and then transferring after the first year.
I don't feel like that's secure but this was my resit year. The decisions I have made have turned out badly for me and I'm doubting my own judgment.
I just want to know from anyone else's experience, which would be the better option.
I feel as though they're both basically exactly the same as in they have the same purpose- for me to get onto my degree of choice. But I feel as though the access course is more stable and it costs like £6000 less.
I want to know the advantages of completing the first year as a foundation degree over doing the access course.
Thanks
None tbh, only positive is that u will be with university students of the age 18+ compared to college where its 16+.
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gigglefits
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(Original post by Alzata)
None tbh, only positive is that u will be with university students of the age 18+ compared to college where its 16+.
The access course is for 19+ students, but I understand what you mean, like college can have students who are 16 aswell
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gigglefits
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(Original post by claireestelle)
foundation years would be better preparation as it specifically perhaps you for university study and it would be very unlikely you'd ever pay your whole student debt back anyway.
I understand, but if I don't do well then what would my options be
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Snufkin
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(Original post by gigglefits)
I didn't get the grade I needed to get into uni.
I applied on to an access course lvl 3 into health science (equivalent to 3 alevels) at college as a back up. I have a place on this course.
Now that clearing is in the air, I'm being told left right and center that it might be worth ditching the access course for biomed/ clin sci and then transferring after the first year.
I don't feel like that's secure but this was my resit year. The decisions I have made have turned out badly for me and I'm doubting my own judgment.
I just want to know from anyone else's experience, which would be the better option.
I feel as though they're both basically exactly the same as in they have the same purpose- for me to get onto my degree of choice. But I feel as though the access course is more stable and it costs like £6000 less.
I want to know the advantages of completing the first year as a foundation degree over doing the access course.
Thanks
What is your end goal, what degree you would like to do?

The advantages of the university option (I hesitate to say foundation year, because what you describe isn't a foundation year at all - just the first year of a university degree) is that you get to experience university and get a feel for how the subject is studied in a university setting, but it is an expensive option. If you feel you can juggle university studies and a UCAS application (with little to no support from your lecturers) then this is a perfectly good option. Be aware that you would be using up one year of your student loan entitlement, meaning if you had to repeat a year for whatever reason down the line, you'd have to pay the fees yourself.

If you are 19 or older on the first day of the Access course, you can use an Advanced Leaner Loan to pay the fees, and this does not need to be repaid if you subsequently go to university and get a degree. If you are under 19 and have 2 A levels or more then you will have to pay the fees. The benefits of the Access course is that you are continually assessed throughout the year and there's a lot of coursework, which is great if you found the A level system difficult. You also have access to teachers who are experts in guiding you through the UCAS process.

So really the question is, how do you prefer to learn (coursework Vs exams), and how independent are you?
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gigglefits
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(Original post by Snufkin)
What is your end goal, what degree you would like to do?

The advantages of the university option (I hesitate to say foundation year, because what you describe isn't a foundation year at all - just the first year of a university degree) is that you get to experience university and get a feel for how the subject is studied in a university setting, but it is an expensive option. If you feel you can juggle university studies and a UCAS application (with little to no support from your lecturers) then this is a perfectly good option. Be aware that you would be using up one year of your student loan entitlement, meaning if you had to repeat a year for whatever reason down the line, you'd have to pay the fees yourself.

If you are 19 or older on the first day of the Access course, you can use an Advanced Leaner Loan to pay the fees, and this does not need to be repaid if you subsequently go to university and get a degree. If you are under 19 and have 2 A levels or more then you will have to pay the fees. The benefits of the Access course is that you are continually assessed throughout the year and there's a lot of coursework, which is great if you found the A level system difficult. You also have access to teachers who are experts in guiding you through the UCAS process.

So really the question is, how do you prefer to learn (coursework Vs exams), and how independent are you?
Thank you for your answer,
I wanted to get into optometry.

I took the Extended Diploma route which means I needed an alevel. I did the alevel in biology and did it independently. So no help from any tutors or anything. I had to organise the center etc. but that's a whole other story. The bottom line is I did get through it independently but it wasn't easy.
I did the BTEC at college and honestly speaking the teachers were next to no help when it came to the ucas process. Okay they helped but it was a matter of sitting down with them for a max of like 20 minutes throughout the whole process, if that.
It wasn't easy though.
The access course sounds like the better option but I was the one who decided to take the alevel independently and i was the one who decided to take the BTEC and look where my choices have brought me.
Right now I can't trust my judgement but the people I do trust are telling me to forget the access course.
I don't know what to do
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Snufkin
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Report 3 years ago
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(Original post by gigglefits)
Thank you for your answer,
I wanted to get into optometry.

I took the Extended Diploma route which means I needed an alevel. I did the alevel in biology and did it independently. So no help from any tutors or anything. I had to organise the center etc. but that's a whole other story. The bottom line is I did get through it independently but it wasn't easy.
I did the BTEC at college and honestly speaking the teachers were next to no help when it came to the ucas process. Okay they helped but it was a matter of sitting down with them for a max of like 20 minutes throughout the whole process, if that.
It wasn't easy though.
The access course sounds like the better option but I was the one who decided to take the alevel independently and i was the one who decided to take the BTEC and look where my choices have brought me.
Right now I can't trust my judgement but the people I do trust are telling me to forget the access course.
I don't know what to do
From what you've said, I think the Access course would be better. You don't sound quite ready for university, and one false start can put you off the whole thing.
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