bri90bri
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Has anyone studied nursing the OU? or has anyone used OU study to then go onto study nursing full time at another university?
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Snufkin
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(Original post by bri90bri)
Has anyone studied nursing the OU? or has anyone used OU study to then go onto study nursing full time at another university?
Not me personally, but I know someone who has done this - is that what you'd like to do?
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bri90bri
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(Original post by Snufkin)
Not me personally, but I know someone who has done this - is that what you'd like to do?
Yea well I thought it would be a good option as I don't have the grades currently to get into university
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Snufkin
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(Original post by bri90bri)
Yea well I thought it would be a good option as I don't have the grades currently to get into university
An Access to HE (Nursing) course would be a better option, universities love these - but if that isn't possible then doing the first year (stage one) of either the Health Sciences, Healthcare and Health Science or Health and Social Care degrees would probably be acceptable to universities for entry into their Nursing degree. Email individual admission tutors and ask 1. do they accept OU credits as an alternative to A levels, and 2. which of the above subjects they'd prefer.

Note: make sure you do all your OU modules in one academic year, otherwise you may lose student finance entitlement.
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bri90bri
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(Original post by Snufkin)
An Access to HE (Nursing) course would be a better option, universities love these - but if that isn't possible then doing the first year (stage one) of either the Health Sciences, Healthcare and Health Science or Health and Social Care degrees would probably be acceptable to universities for entry into their Nursing degree. Email individual admission tutors and ask 1. do they accept OU credits as an alternative to A levels, and 2. which of the above subjects they'd prefer.

Note: make sure you do all your OU modules in one academic year, otherwise you may lose student finance entitlement.
I don't think I could afford to leave work at the moment to do an access course. I can't see why they couldn't accept OU study as the SCQF level is higher than it is for A levels
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Snufkin
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(Original post by bri90bri)
I don't think I could afford to leave work at the moment to do an access course. I can't see why they couldn't accept OU study as the SCQF level is higher than it is for A levels
They probably will, but it is a less conventional route to take so admission tutors won't be as used to it as they are Access courses. Ask and see.
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bri90bri
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(Original post by Snufkin)
They probably will, but it is a less conventional route to take so admission tutors won't be as used to it as they are Access courses. Ask and see.
How would I find details on admissions tutors
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Snufkin
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(Original post by bri90bri)
How would I find details on admissions tutors
University websites. There will be a list of degrees, find the one you want to apply for and click to read more information about it. Somewhere on that page will be the relevant contact details of the admissions tutor, e.g. this is Manchester's: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/un...adult-nursing/
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klf1980
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Hi , I am currently in my 3rd year of a bsc honours degree in nursing with the Open university.I plan to do a masters at a brick university.I have done this alongside my job as a Healthcare support worker and one of the big health trusts.Its a lot of work,self study and you still have to commit to your workplace hrs.Though i will gain a full time job straight away as a staff nurse,plus I am being fully funded.Its a great opportunity if like me, you have worked in the NHS for years.Its a long haul course and not for the faint hearted lol .Good luck ☺
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limbelover
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this is really helpful. i am looking to take on a degree in mental health nursing with the open university. i already work as a mental helth care assisitnat. how is the placement organised. self study requires a a lot of discipline. how has the experience on independent studying been for you. would you do the ou again or go into a proper uni
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TRINABELLE
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(Original post by limbelover)
this is really helpful. i am looking to take on a degree in mental health nursing with the open university. i already work as a mental helth care assisitnat. how is the placement organised. self study requires a a lot of discipline. how has the experience on independent studying been for you. would you do the ou again or go into a proper uni
Hi I'm currently on secondment from my NHS Trust to complete my degree in mental health nursing. It's a four year course. It does need a lot of work and discipline to study at distance. I've got a degree from a brick uni although I couldn't use it against credits for this course. To compare the two routes, the brick uni is far better for a learning environment. You get to interact with other students and discuss things face to face. You can also learn from the different methods they use such as tutorials, practicals and lectures. However the open uni standard is high. When iv been on placement with other student nurses from the brick uni and I show them my work they are pretty shocked at the level. Same with the mentors so I know it hadn't just been a one off. The open uni gives you a tutor for each subject and a placement tutor for the duration of the course. If I was single and could afford it I'd choose the brick uni and complete in three years. As im a "mature" 😂 student with children i can study from home, no train fares to uni and can work around my kids. And no debt unlike my first degree. If you have any questions feel free to ask ☺
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Jess1409
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HI I am currently studying BSC Hons nursing degree through the secondment. it takes four years and i agree it is not for the faint hearted. I have showed students my work and the website and it appears ours is a lot harder. yes you dont attend uni each week and dont have to do group workings or presentations but its so much harder. especially the second year where we have to study biology. Programme In the first year which is 12 months you do various placements, study two modules alongside each other which expects work to be done each week, one exam and a portfolio. The second year is over 18 months. This has three modules which at one point you again have two running alongside each other. Its hard and you have to be self disciplined and organised to be on top of your work and studying. You still work as HCA alongside this. the final year is 18 months and has two modules. Its 8 essays and a dissertation and an exam in total. Really tough but break it down and its ok. planner each year you get a planner which shows where you are each week. Employer is HCA or Annual leave. Practice is when you are on placements which for me are typically 5 weeks. final is 12 weeks. Make sure you can commute as this is tough when studying. Then theory is when you have study time at home. Dont let this fool you. No matter what week it is there is still work to be done on the modules. website and forums etctutorials are online and are not frequent. they are compulsory. You only have one study day at a uni for the biology exam. Website i think is easy to navigate and helpful. Loads of useful links, online library etc Forums help you chat to other students and ask questions etc. they are checked by tutors and you need to get involved to show you are participating. Fees its free! you are seconded. All you have to do is get through the application process and have your employer support you. You get paid as HCA and continue to work when the planner states. They send books occasionally and the biology module books were ace. im keeping them as i find them so useful. Theres four of them for the exam and so good!TutorsYou get module tutors for each module you do. A practice tutor for your placements and then student support online to help with anything. Support So far i have had great support. Sometimes my tutors have been slow to respond and let me tell you when you are sat at your computer needing help right away this is frustrating. just be patient and keep going. try ask other students for help. Speak to colleagues. My only issue personally is travelling. make sure your hospital is local that seconds you as that is where you do most of your placements and obviously HCA hours. I am not local and have to commute and its made my life so much harder. Just be prepared to graft and enjoy the journey.
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Pennyjoann
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Just thought I would add to Jess1409 post, hope you don't mind ^_^ I'm in stage 1 and a few things have changed, fees are no longer free with NHS not funding nursing degrees anymore, you have to get a student loan, however you will still get paid your HCA wage so still better off than going to a brick uni! You no longer get theory blocks, you have to study in your own time (this also due to funding), I'm in the first cohort to do the degree without blocks of theory in the planner, I've managed so far, but can't tell you what it will be like in stage 2 and 3 to have to study in your own time, I'm anticipating much harder. That does concern me!
And I think the only other thing that is different is there is no longer an exam at the end of stage 1, you get 2 computer marked assessments which you get a period of time to complete.
Not many exams, but many, many assignments! I do really enjoy studying from home at my own pace, and tutors are pretty good. Do recommend!
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Nikkipemb
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Hi. Sorry to jump on this thread but u all seem to be on the same page as me.
I work as a HCA for an agency. I am looking at starting with the OU for a nursing degree. However due to the kind of work I do I have sourced my own placement in a nursing home as I can guarantee a mentor on placement (as stated in requirement under nursing degree on OU website). I'm hoping this will be ok to start with then once I start the course someone will guide me as to where my next placement will need to be. Can anyone give me a break down of year 1 placement year 2 placement and year 3 placement please?
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Sara7127
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HiJust been reading your posts, and wondered if you could give me some advice!I'm wanting to do a nursing degree and currently favouring OU as simply can not quit work! I work for a private children's based care company and look after a baby girl with complex care needs, I'm a HCA! I haven't been in education since 1995 but do have my gcses in maths and English! I've looking into doing the national diploma in nursing as an intro to degree! I would want to work nhs after qualifying, but what is the set up for placements etc?Any help gratefully received 🤗
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Lt8878
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Hi I’ve just been offered an interview for this course. I currently work with district nurses as a hcsw, does anyone know will I continue to work there for placements and then be placed on different areas as well e.g. hospital for stints?
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Pennyjoann
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Hi, congratulations and good luck! 😁

Yes you will do a lot of your placements where you work now but will have alternative placements too. I work on a ward usually but I'm currently on a community placement! The uni will make sure you get all the experiences you need, hope this helps
(Original post by Lt8878)
Hi I’ve just been offered an interview for this course. I currently work with district nurses as a hcsw, does anyone know will I continue to work there for placements and then be placed on different areas as well e.g. hospital for stints?
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Lt8878
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Thank you for replying that really helps, keeping my fingers crossed!
(Original post by Pennyjoann)
Hi, congratulations and good luck! 😁

Yes you will do a lot of your placements where you work now but will have alternative placements too. I work on a ward usually but I'm currently on a community placement! The uni will make sure you get all the experiences you need, hope this helps
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Lt8878
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Was the interview really formal or was it quite relaxed? I’m not great in interviews!
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Pennyjoann
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(Original post by Lt8878)
Was the interview really formal or was it quite relaxed? I’m not great in interviews!
I'm not good in interviews either. I was interviewed by someone from the uni and the practice learning facilitator at my trust. I'd say it was somewhere in between formal and informal, definitely not super formal. Remember your 6 Cs! That's my best advice ☺
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