Mr revision
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I'm considering dropping maths and doing A-level history, I just want to know what you do in history? what you do in the coursework? and how hard it is?
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999tigger
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(Original post by Mr revision)
I'm considering dropping maths and doing A-level history, I just want to know what you do in history? what you do in the coursework? and how hard it is?
Same as GCSE but a bit more depth and detail.

You either like it and find learning about the past interesting or you hate it.
You investigate what happened and why.

It has a lot of volume and a lot of people comment it is one of the harder A levels to do.
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Ninic
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(Original post by Mr revision)
I'm considering dropping maths and doing A-level history, I just want to know what you do in history? what you do in the coursework? and how hard it is?
I have just done 2 years of Alevel history, and i did crusades with making of modern britain course (aqa) History is a very respected alevel because i wont lie it is hard but very rewarding, its not hard to understand, and very interesting but there is a lot to remember and i would say that %70 of the exam marks/ high grades come from knowing exam technique ( e.g how to write a great essay with great structure and evidence) the other 30% is facts. you can not just dump facts or unsupported claims in an essay and expect marks. the coursework is usually writing a big essay on a subject e.g witchcraft with some sourcework (its fun) i would recommend doing history, there is no reason you cant achieve a B/A/A* in it if you work hard ( also dont just use that text book, it sucks, use more in depth books for real marks) peace
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LennyBicknel
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I did OCR History A.

Unlike most subjects, there's no set 'content' which you cover - each 6th form selects from a wide choice of different topics to teach (provided by the exam board); depending on your college, you may be given a choice of which areas you cover, or your college may have only a singular option (like mine - we did Russian history from 1894-1939, British political history from 1951-97, and the Witchcrazes of the Early Modern period). The exam board creates papers for each of these potential topics. You should read into what your 6th form offers and see if it peaks your interest.

As 99tigger said, essentially the core part of A-Level history is pure content, in a greater depth vs GCSE. There's greater focus on the 'analytical' side of history (i.e. what 'roles' different factors played), and building coherent and thorough arguments to give over your view. For OCR History, the Witchcrazes topic, for instance, was one of the options for the 'thematic' part of the A-Level, where instead of looking very in-depth over a few years (like in Russian history), we instead looked at broader themes over 3 centuries. For our coursework, we were given the choice of 10 questions to 'answer' in a 4000 word essay (for us, they were roughly based around our Russia course, but you're technically allowed to do it on anything and create your own questions).

History's difficult. I'm not gunna lie. There's loads of content, and the skills involved are challenging. But, if you have a passion or interest for history, the content side of things will actually be very enjoyable. It's learning what the exam boards want in terms of framing arguments, analysis, evaluation, conclusions etc. which constitutes the most difficult part.

Hope this helps (btw, I'm not sure how much this applies to other exam boards, but I'm assuming it's pretty similar).
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marionn
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I missed out on getting into university because my history teacher told me my coursework was 40/40 but it got marked down to 22/40. BE CAUTIOUS
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Mr revision
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(Original post by LennyBicknel)
I did OCR History A.

Unlike most subjects, there's no set 'content' which you cover - each 6th form selects from a wide choice of different topics to teach (provided by the exam board); depending on your college, you may be given a choice of which areas you cover, or your college may have only a singular option (like mine - we did Russian history from 1894-1939, British political history from 1951-97, and the Witchcrazes of the Early Modern period). The exam board creates papers for each of these potential topics. You should read into what your 6th form offers and see if it peaks your interest.

As 99tigger said, essentially the core part of A-Level history is pure content, in a greater depth vs GCSE. There's greater focus on the 'analytical' side of history (i.e. what 'roles' different factors played), and building coherent and thorough arguments to give over your view. For OCR History, the Witchcrazes topic, for instance, was one of the options for the 'thematic' part of the A-Level, where instead of looking very in-depth over a few years (like in Russian history), we instead looked at broader themes over 3 centuries. For our coursework, we were given the choice of 10 questions to 'answer' in a 4000 word essay (for us, they were roughly based around our Russia course, but you're technically allowed to do it on anything and create your own questions).

History's difficult. I'm not gunna lie. There's loads of content, and the skills involved are challenging. But, if you have a passion or interest for history, the content side of things will actually be very enjoyable. It's learning what the exam boards want in terms of framing arguments, analysis, evaluation, conclusions etc. which constitutes the most difficult part.

Hope this helps (btw, I'm not sure how much this applies to other exam boards, but I'm assuming it's pretty similar).
ok thanks.
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matty1356
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I did both and got an a* in history and an a in maths. I found history, however, a lot harder over the whole two years and required a significant amount of perseverance to memorise literally so many dates and facts from Germany 20th century to Stuart Britain to the American Civil War, in my coursework. It can be very overwhelming the amount of extra work you have to do, especially if you 'only' get like 16/25 on an essay, for example. Maths was easier throughout the year. The jump from c2 to c3 is quite big yet c3 to c4 is not that bad at all and while doing past papers I found c4 easier. The exams, however, were horrible, getting a c in both, despite predicted an a*. This is as a result, probably, of prioritising history over maths during study leave, legit about 70% of revision was history, and only focusing on maths again once history was completed. Tbh I think it depends what your other subjects are but I'd say do maths lol
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Mr revision
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(Original post by matty1356)
I did both and got an a* in history and an a in maths. I found history, however, a lot harder over the whole two years and required a significant amount of perseverance to memorise literally so many dates and facts from Germany 20th century to Stuart Britain to the American Civil War, in my coursework. It can be very overwhelming the amount of extra work you have to do, especially if you 'only' get like 16/25 on an essay, for example. Maths was easier throughout the year. The jump from c2 to c3 is quite big yet c3 to c4 is not that bad at all and while doing past papers I found c4 easier. The exams, however, were horrible, getting a c in both, despite predicted an a*. This is as a result, probably, of prioritising history over maths during study leave, legit about 70% of revision was history, and only focusing on maths again once history was completed. Tbh I think it depends what your other subjects are but I'd say do maths lol
Cheers, but how did you find As history and what grade did you get in As
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matty1356
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(Original post by Mr revision)
Cheers, but how did you find As history and what grade did you get in As
AS history was pretty hard. I got a c in the exam, though it didn't count for anything. From like half term of first term of AS I'd discounted getting and a* in it so still pretty shocked tbh
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StevetheIcecube
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I do history and I love it! A lot of people find it very hard, though. You have to be prepared to put in a lot of work and you really have to understand what you're learning or you won't be able to write about it. There's lots of analysis involved and a lot less of the description that is done at GCSE level.

For coursework, you get the chance over a long period of time to perfect an essay. They're often about causation, factors, that kind of thing, and you have to use sources and analyse them too. If you're suggesting doing the full History A Level over one year, I'd say don't bother, it's too much content for you to do in one year. But if you have two years, then go for it!
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