Rmcewan15
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Hi,

First, a brief explanation of the situation.

Due to circumstances I've moved from a school that uses the English system to a school that uses the Scottish system. This has meant I've obviously changed qualifications, and by extension, syllabi.

I did this on rather short notice (I did the paperwork this morning, and am starting on Monday), and in my meeting with the headmistress of my new school, she indicated that Advanced Higher English (which I'm doing) requires me to have read the Thomas Hardy works Far from the Madding Crowd and Tess of the D'Urbevilles. I'm not completely new to Thomas Hardy (my GCSE teacher mistakenly taught us his poetry for a term), but I've read neither of these books. At my current rate of reading (I'm a bit busy with admin and other stuff), I reckon I can only finish Far from the Madding Crowd by Monday.

Now for my questions.

Do I need to have read both of these books to start the course? If so, what would be my best strategy to understand both of them by Monday? I have already read a summary of Tess of the D'Urbevilles, but I feel like I need more in-depth knowledge of both the books to keep up. I also have a lot of maths to revise this weekend to prepare for Higher Maths (which I'm hoping to upgrade to Advanced Higher maths) as well as a number of social engagements so I'm pushed for time. I am prepared to pull an all-nighter on Saturday night if needs be.

Finally, beyond these two books, is there any other prior knowledge expected? If so, what specifically, and do you have any advice on the best way to go about acquiring that knowledge in a weekend?

Thanks in advance, if I can pull this off it would really help me feel like I'm ready for what is quite a big year at school.
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georginarowley
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(Original post by Rmcewan15)
Hi,

First, a brief explanation of the situation.

Due to circumstances I've moved from a school that uses the English system to a school that uses the Scottish system. This has meant I've obviously changed qualifications, and by extension, syllabi.

I did this on rather short notice (I did the paperwork this morning, and am starting on Monday), and in my meeting with the headmistress of my new school, she indicated that Advanced Higher English (which I'm doing) requires me to have read the Thomas Hardy works Far from the Madding Crowd and Tess of the D'Urbevilles. I'm not completely new to Thomas Hardy (my GCSE teacher mistakenly taught us his poetry for a term), but I've read neither of these books. At my current rate of reading (I'm a bit busy with admin and other stuff), I reckon I can only finish Far from the Madding Crowd by Monday.

Now for my questions.

Do I need to have read both of these books to start the course? If so, what would be my best strategy to understand both of them by Monday? I have already read a summary of Tess of the D'Urbevilles, but I feel like I need more in-depth knowledge of both the books to keep up. I also have a lot of maths to revise this weekend to prepare for Higher Maths (which I'm hoping to upgrade to Advanced Higher maths) as well as a number of social engagements so I'm pushed for time. I am prepared to pull an all-nighter on Saturday night if needs be.

Finally, beyond these two books, is there any other prior knowledge expected? If so, what specifically, and do you have any advice on the best way to go about acquiring that knowledge in a weekend?

Thanks in advance, if I can pull this off it would really help me feel like I'm ready for what is quite a big year at school.
Hi,
first of all, it sounds like you're really motivated to do well so I think you'll be ok. I totally get that its a bit mad to try and read both 'Far from the Madding Crowd' and 'Tess of D'Urbevilles' within a few days. If you could finish one for when you start, that would be a good start to the course; maybe ask around and see how far along the class is with the books. In my English Literature class we started 'Dracula' in September and gradually went through it in class, however, our teacher did expect us to have read all of it so we didn't have to go through every single chapter. I think that you'll be fine as the teachers will understand that its a big ask to start a new school and deal with all the admin too, so you'll be cut some slack for that. Best of luck blitzing Thomas Hardy, I think you'll be absolutely fine.
Georgina
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username2981082
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(Original post by Rmcewan15)
Hi,

First, a brief explanation of the situation.

Due to circumstances I've moved from a school that uses the English system to a school that uses the Scottish system. This has meant I've obviously changed qualifications, and by extension, syllabi.

I did this on rather short notice (I did the paperwork this morning, and am starting on Monday), and in my meeting with the headmistress of my new school, she indicated that Advanced Higher English (which I'm doing) requires me to have read the Thomas Hardy works Far from the Madding Crowd and Tess of the D'Urbevilles. I'm not completely new to Thomas Hardy (my GCSE teacher mistakenly taught us his poetry for a term), but I've read neither of these books. At my current rate of reading (I'm a bit busy with admin and other stuff), I reckon I can only finish Far from the Madding Crowd by Monday.

Now for my questions.

Do I need to have read both of these books to start the course? If so, what would be my best strategy to understand both of them by Monday? I have already read a summary of Tess of the D'Urbevilles, but I feel like I need more in-depth knowledge of both the books to keep up. I also have a lot of maths to revise this weekend to prepare for Higher Maths (which I'm hoping to upgrade to Advanced Higher maths) as well as a number of social engagements so I'm pushed for time. I am prepared to pull an all-nighter on Saturday night if needs be.

Finally, beyond these two books, is there any other prior knowledge expected? If so, what specifically, and do you have any advice on the best way to go about acquiring that knowledge in a weekend?

Thanks in advance, if I can pull this off it would really help me feel like I'm ready for what is quite a big year at school.
I have read most of Thomas Hardy's books (because I'm a big reader) and I don't recommend rushing through the novels. Hardy's language is quite complex as he was a naturalist writer and understanding his language style is key to analysing the books.

What I would suggest to do is to take your time reading the first few chapters and then look up the plot of the rest of the story.

You could also research more on Victorian society. Most of Hardy's novels are commenting on issues that are to do with Victorian society. So maybe look up things like the status of women in Victorian society.
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