Want more information about this university?

What is there to do at Lancaster... is it boring?

Watch
Birb Queen
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I really don't want to sound condescending here! I just want to know what there is to do there, and if it's busy, etc.

I originally applied to Nottingham, Leeds, etc. because I like the city vibe and it's just very buzzing, but how does Lancaster compare to this? Does it get boring and is it in the middle of nowhere? I just want to make sure I'm in the right location.

Again, I'm really not trying to sound rude!
0
reply
shutupem
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
It's definitely not the same as Leeds, but you end up going to the same few clubs wherever you go to uni after freshers. There's like 4 or 5 actual nightclubs (a thriving drug scene if that's your thing) and a few more bars, lots of late night takeaways etc. If you like to go to a different place every night it's probably not for you, but it's nice in other ways and it feels a lot safer than a bigger city.
0
reply
MonsoonStorm
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
If you have spare cash it is also a major rail hub on the west coast line. Lots of cities to choose from. Manchester, London, Leeds, Glasgow and Edinburgh all direct.
0
reply
liviward36
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Birb Queen)
I really don't want to sound condescending here! I just want to know what there is to do there, and if it's busy, etc.

I originally applied to Nottingham, Leeds, etc. because I like the city vibe and it's just very buzzing, but how does Lancaster compare to this? Does it get boring and is it in the middle of nowhere? I just want to make sure I'm in the right location.

Again, I'm really not trying to sound rude!
I originally applied to Nottingham too but went to Lancaster instead and absolutely love it.

A lot of people (myself included) will say there's nothing to do but drink in Lancaster but if I'm honest the only time I ever really needed to leave campus was to get the free us to the student nightxlub. The club scene is pretty naff, the only decent place is Sugar (student club), Dalton on a Monday and Hustle on a Tuesday and Thursday but tbf it means you'll always know everyone when you go out and everyone's Gerri g taxis back to campus.

Pretty much everything you can think of you can find on campus, there's only a 3 hour period from 4 till 7 where food places are shut, there's a WHSmiths, a Greggs, charity shop, ect. so you don't really have to leave campus ever (I only did to go home in second term).

There's a few things in town, like 2 theatres, Williamson Park (which has meerkats and a butterfly house), the castle and more which make nice days out. Train also goes to pretty much anywhere, Manchester, Preston, Glasgow, Edingburg, Liverpool I think? But if you join enough societies and go out any where near as much as I do you won't have time and you won't miss it either.
0
reply
liviward36
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Cravez)
So here's the low down: if you value a social life then don't go to Lancaster. It's full of sad northerners who have never met a non-white person in their life. There is absolutely nothing to do apart from study and go to the gym.

The campus is basically a prison. Better to life off campus even in first year.

If you do end up going my advice is to get a car, make some decent friends from the management school/post grads and travel out every weekend to prevent insanity from setting in. The people who tell you Lancaster is great for social life have never studied anywhere else so they have nothing to compare it to.

If you are yourself a sad northerner and like living in the 1800s then discard this advice - you will fit right in.
It's really not bad šŸ˜‚ I mean I'm southern to start with... the real solution to just drink when you get bored
0
reply
TriksyBob
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
This is coming from a 'Happy' (in contrast to 'Sad) Southerner. I thought University was for learning, not a party competition.
1
reply
username334839
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by TriksyBob)
This is coming from a 'Happy' (in contrast to 'Sad) Southerner. I thought University was for learning, not a party competition.
The thread starter wanted to know about what there is to do at Lancaster and social life not about the academic prowess of the university.

But I do agree with you - going to uni has become a joke and many students treat it as a joke therefore undervaluing the meaning of a degree. The vast majority of degrees are useless (arts, music, theatre, sociology, geography, psychology lol) and most students just get drunk and piss around for three years. No point going to a uni unless its in the top 15 and you plan on actually making the most of it.
0
reply
TriksyBob
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by Cravez)
The thread starter wanted to know about what there is to do at Lancaster and social life not about the academic prowess of the university.

But I do agree with you - going to uni has become a joke and many students treat it as a joke therefore undervaluing the meaning of a degree. The vast majority of degrees are useless (arts, music, theatre, sociology, geography, psychology lol) and most students just get drunk and piss around for three years. No point going to a uni unless its in the top 15 and you plan on actually making the most of it.


No point going to uni unless its in the top 15 and doesn't include subjects such as sociology, psychology. Really? No point for who? So the only subjects worth studying are medicine, engineering.........and physics, biology, etc - where's would you draw the boundary? By studying physics means you'll end up a physicist will you? I dont think so. You could end up on the dole or in Waitrose on checkout. Trust me there are no guarantees with any university or degree course.
Based on your post we should not study subjects which don't DIRECTLY lead to a specific career path. Is there a rule about studying for the sake of learning a subject you enjoy, rather than one you think will pay out on completion. Anyone taking on a degree on this basis will be bitterly dissapointed as graduate jobs are few and dwindling. Most engineering graduates don't become engineers.
0
reply
username334839
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by TriksyBob)
No point going to uni unless its in the top 15 and doesn't include subjects such as sociology, psychology. Really? No point for who? So the only subjects worth studying are medicine, engineering.........and physics, biology, etc - where's would you draw the boundary? By studying physics means you'll end up a physicist will you? I dont think so. You could end up on the dole or in Waitrose on checkout. Trust me there are no guarantees with any university or degree course.
Based on your post we should not study subjects which don't DIRECTLY lead to a specific career path. Is there a rule about studying for the sake of learning a subject you enjoy, rather than one you think will pay out on completion. Anyone taking on a degree on this basis will be bitterly dissapointed as graduate jobs are few and dwindling. Most engineering graduates don't become engineers.
calm your tits bro

The simple fact is that studying media at bolton will get you nowhere. Whereas studying chemical engineering at Imperial will very likely get you a graduate job (not necessaily in engineering - I am fully aware that it is the trasferable skills that you gain at uni that are of value and you do not necessarily need to choose a degree with the aim of going into a particular career)
Similarly - studing sociology at Cambridge will most likely be fruitful because of the pretigious institution and the rigour of its educational system - not because you will definately end up being a sociologist.
Plenty of physcis students go into non physics related careers because of the critical analysis skills they gain at uni and not because of their understanding of particle physics.

There is surplus of people with degrees applying to graduate jobs. The surplus leads to a devaluation of the degree which increases competetion even more (which is why employers and others look at the type of degree and the uni you went to) It gets quite diffiuclt to justify 40K+ of debt for theater studies at bedforshire when you are stuggling to even get a non-graduate job. If you really want to go to uni just to learn for the sake of learing a subject you enjoy - there are these amazing things called books and the internet...
1
reply
Maid Marian
Badges: 20
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
The city of Lancaster is a beautiful place, and nothing like a big city. It's small and cosy. If you want a buzzing city life, it's probably not for you. Lancaster buzzes, but in more of a quaint little town way.

I don't go to the main Lancaster uni, so can't really comment on that except for on the couple of occasions I've been there I've not been too impressed. It's a very self-contained campus.

(Original post by liviward36)
There's a few things in town, like 2 theatres, Williamson Park (which has meerkats and a butterfly house), the castle and more which make nice days out. Train also goes to pretty much anywhere, Manchester, Preston, Glasgow, Edingburg, Liverpool I think? But if you join enough societies and go out any where near as much as I do you won't have time and you won't miss it either.
AND BABY WABBITS!!! :bunny:
0
reply
TriksyBob
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Cravez)
calm your tits bro

The simple fact is that studying media at bolton will get you nowhere. Whereas studying chemical engineering at Imperial will very likely get you a graduate job (not necessaily in engineering - I am fully aware that it is the trasferable skills that you gain at uni that are of value and you do not necessarily need to choose a degree with the aim of going into a particular career)
Similarly - studing sociology at Cambridge will most likely be fruitful because of the pretigious institution and the rigour of its educational system - not because you will definately end up being a sociologist.
Plenty of physcis students go into non physics related careers because of the critical analysis skills they gain at uni and not because of their understanding of particle physics.

There is surplus of people with degrees applying to graduate jobs. The surplus leads to a devaluation of the degree which increases competetion even more (which is why employers and others look at the type of degree and the uni you went to) It gets quite diffiuclt to justify 40K+ of debt for theater studies at bedforshire when you are stuggling to even get a non-graduate job. If you really want to go to uni just to learn for the sake of learing a subject you enjoy - there are these amazing things called books and the internet...


Ok "Bro" -

Again huge assumption that going to Bedfordshire inevitably means no graduate prospects. Absoiute nonsense. Sociology at Cambridhe is high quality whilst anywhere else it is poor quality. Complete rubbish. It's an individual choice to study whichever subject people want, not for you to judge what is 'worth' studying - purely based on future economic reward. Stop judging what is worthwhile. A physics course leads to high quality analytical skills and a history course doesn't? Erhem i dont think so.

If what you say that graduates get recruited into graduate jobs on the basis of thei 'critical skills'not subject based skills (eg. particlae physics) then surely it makes not difference what subject you study - arts, humanities or science - following your logic.

To say you have better analytical skills ONLY because you went to oxford compared to say warwick or swnasea or dare i say it BEDFORDSHIRE is a huge assumption, and most people get found out at interview (particularly for professional jobs) where your background becomes less relevant than the critical skills you have there and then and your ability to forge a logical argument to the panel. You seem to think that a label will automatically grant you a fancy professional career - wake up you need a reality check. Or haven't you seen the real world yet? Good luck.
0
reply
liviward36
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by littlenorthernlass)
The city of Lancaster is a beautiful place, and nothing like a big city. It's small and cosy. If you want a buzzing city life, it's probably not for you. Lancaster buzzes, but in more of a quaint little town way.

I don't go to the main Lancaster uni, so can't really comment on that except for on the couple of occasions I've been there I've not been too impressed. It's a very self-contained campus.
AND BABY WABBITS!!! :bunny:
Nah campus is lovely, especially like greenery around it! But yeah very self contained haha.
Did not know they had bunnies tho!!!!

(Original post by Cravez)

The simple fact is that studying media at bolton will get you nowhere. ...
(Original post by TriksyBob)

Again huge assumption that going to Bedfordshire inevitably means no graduate prospects. Absoiute nonsense. ....
Is any of this relevant? Lancaster is a great uni, top 10! Drink and party as much or as little as you like as long as you get a decent grade at the end of it.
0
reply
username334839
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by TriksyBob)
Ok "Bro" -

Again huge assumption that going to Bedfordshire inevitably means no graduate prospects. Absoiute nonsense. Sociology at Cambridhe is high quality whilst anywhere else it is poor quality. Complete rubbish. It's an individual choice to study whichever subject people want, not for you to judge what is 'worth' studying - purely based on future economic reward. Stop judging what is worthwhile. A physics course leads to high quality analytical skills and a history course doesn't? Erhem i dont think so.

If what you say that graduates get recruited into graduate jobs on the basis of thei 'critical skills'not subject based skills (eg. particlae physics) then surely it makes not difference what subject you study - arts, humanities or science - following your logic.

To say you have better analytical skills ONLY because you went to oxford compared to say warwick or swnasea or dare i say it BEDFORDSHIRE is a huge assumption, and most people get found out at interview (particularly for professional jobs) where your background becomes less relevant than the critical skills you have there and then and your ability to forge a logical argument to the panel. You seem to think that a label will automatically grant you a fancy professional career - wake up you need a reality check. Or haven't you seen the real world yet? Good luck.

Complete and utter misinterpretation of what I wrote so there is no point in replying to most of your comments. e.g I never said a history course will not give you strong critical appraisal skills - a history course from Warwick definitely will, however, a history course from Cumbria less so in comparison.

People are of course welcome to do whatever course at whichever university they like, but there is a reason hundreds of thousands of people globally try and get into the top British universities - because it does make a difference where you study. You think all those people working ridiculously hard to get into Oxbridge are wasting their time and they might aswell just go to Bradford because it makes no difference? go tell them that

I completely agree that it is the interview and assessment stages that determine whether an applicant gets the job or not. And quite rightly. However, to even get to the initial stage of interview you need to be selected from a huge swathe of applicants. Most graduate job applications that the average graduate makes will not even make it to interview stage because of the competition.

Have you seen the graduate scheme applications forms for the top consulting companies? In the education section it gives you a drop down list of 8 universities including Oxbridge, LSE, Warwick, Imperial and others. There is another option called "other" - top employers really do care where you went to university. You might not like that fact but unfortunately its the truth. Ever tried to get into the Civil Service Fast Stream as an undergraduate? You can do it, but everyone knows that if you went to a top 10 uni you are way more likely to get to the interview stage.

Finally - its not that getting a good degree from a top institution will automatically get you a good career. Nowhere did I say that. If you go to Durham and piss around for 3 years, get poor grades, not do any CV building, work experience or extracurricular activities you certainly wont be getting a decent job anytime soon.

However, if you went to Durham and worked very hard at both your degree and work experience and all those other things, then you are more likely to get a job interview or opportunity than someone who had an identical CV to you but went to Suffolk instead.
0
reply
TriksyBob
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
(Original post by Cravez)
Complete and utter misinterpretation of what I wrote so there is no point in replying to most of your comments. e.g I never said a history course will not give you strong critical appraisal skills - a history course from Warwick definitely will, however, a history course from Cumbria less so in comparison.

People are of course welcome to do whatever course at whichever university they like, but there is a reason hundreds of thousands of people globally try and get into the top British universities - because it does make a difference where you study. You think all those people working ridiculously hard to get into Oxbridge are wasting their time and they might aswell just go to Bradford because it makes no difference? go tell them that

I completely agree that it is the interview and assessment stages that determine whether an applicant gets the job or not. And quite rightly. However, to even get to the initial stage of interview you need to be selected from a huge swathe of applicants. Most graduate job applications that the average graduate makes will not even make it to interview stage because of the competition.

Have you seen the graduate scheme applications forms for the top consulting companies? In the education section it gives you a drop down list of 8 universities including Oxbridge, LSE, Warwick, Imperial and others. There is another option called "other" - top employers really do care where you went to university. You might not like that fact but unfortunately its the truth. Ever tried to get into the Civil Service Fast Stream as an undergraduate? You can do it, but everyone knows that if you went to a top 10 uni you are way more likely to get to the interview stage.

Finally - its not that getting a good degree from a top institution will automatically get you a good career. Nowhere did I say that. If you go to Durham and piss around for 3 years, get poor grades, not do any CV building, work experience or extracurricular activities you certainly wont be getting a decent job anytime soon.

However, if you went to Durham and worked very hard at both your degree and work experience and all those other things, then you are more likely to get a job interview or opportunity than someone who had an identical CV to you but went to Suffolk instead.


Once you remove the graduate schemes or so called 'graduate jobs', the number of grad positions is far and few between, there's a second and third tier of positions where you are competing with everyone and anyone from all backgrounds. Many from non highly ranked universities actually do very well in comparison with those from highly ranked institutions. To say that a label will guarantee you one of these jobs is coocoo land. It takes a lot more than cv building. At this point you are competing not simply on the basis of a label or a nice cv, but on what additional skills you have eg. what's your added value compared to similar clones from a similar background, what makes you stand out, are you a critical thinker in an interview situation etc. Not quite as black and white as Durham versus Stafordshire Uni.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What are you most likely to do if you don't get the grades you were expecting?

Go through Clearing (210)
38.53%
Take autumn exams (164)
30.09%
Look for a job (19)
3.49%
Consider an apprenticeship (22)
4.04%
Take a year out (97)
17.8%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (33)
6.06%

Watched Threads

View All