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Why doesnt England have its own cultral food? watch

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    I cant even say Roast Dinner is British as Im sure many countries eat meat potatoe and veg on a plate and dont call it a roast. Only thing we can claim is fish n chips.. all thats left is a few pastries like pasties. Quite **** really.
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    (Original post by Got Milk)
    I cant even say Roast Dinner is British as Im sure many countries eat meat potatoe and veg on a plate and dont call it a roast. Only thing we can claim is fish n chips.. all thats left is a few pastries like pasties. Quite **** really.
    This might be bait but just to prove you're wrong:

    Pan Haggerty
    Melton Mowbray Pork Pies
    A traditional Sunday Roast is British - it was traditionally eaten on a Sunday after church services from the 18th Century.
    Spotted **** (lol).
    Sausage & Mash
    Cornish Pasties
    Yorkshire puddings
    Crumpets
    English breakfast
    Cottage pie
    English Muffins
    Bubble and Squeak
    Eton Mess
    Scotch eggs
    Piccalilli
    Toad in the hole
    Scones
    Afternoon tea
    Sticky toffee pudding
    Shephard's pie...

    The list goes on...

    We also have Anglo-Indian dishes such as chicken-tikka masala.

    This is also not mentioning cultural dishes that are native to the other home nations (i.e. NI, Wales, and Scotland).
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    Is it salted and boiled?

    Good, it's "English" food now.

    :x
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Is it salted and boiled?

    Good, it's "English" food now.

    :x
    What foods are they?
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    What foods are they?
    If you salt and boil anything it becomes English. Cabbage? Bam, English. Lamb? English. Robert Downey Jr? Where do you think we got Bendaryl Cabbagepatch?

    You just have to make it as blaaaaaaaaaaand as possible. So don't overdo the salt. One grain is usually more than sufficient.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    If you salt and boil anything it becomes English. Cabbage? Bam, English. Lamb? English. Robert Downey Jr? Where do you think we got Bendaryl Cabbagepatch?

    You just have to make it as blaaaaaaaaaaand as possible. So don't overdo the salt. One grain is usually more than sufficient.
    Lol, nice troll.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    This might be bait but just to prove you're wrong:

    Pan Haggerty
    Melton Mowbray Pork Pies
    A traditional Sunday Roast is British - it was traditionally eaten on a Sunday after church services from the 18th Century.
    Spotted **** (lol).
    Sausage & Mash
    Cornish Pasties
    Yorkshire puddings
    Crumpets
    English breakfast
    Cottage pie
    English Muffins
    Bubble and Squeak
    Eton Mess
    Scotch eggs
    Piccalilli
    Toad in the hole
    Scones
    Afternoon tea
    Sticky toffee pudding
    Shephard's pie...

    The list goes on...

    We also have Anglo-Indian dishes such as chicken-tikka masala.

    This is also not mentioning cultural dishes that are native to the other home nations (i.e. NI, Wales, and Scotland).
    got milk posting bait? no way.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    Lol, nice troll.
    Facetiousness aside, 5 of the list you provided are literally what I described.

    Also "picalili" is not a British dish, it's a *******ization of a traditional Indian dish.

    I'd also argue several of the other things on your list are variants of the same dish, and the idea that "afternoon tea" is somehow a "dish" is absurd. Plus, the drink of tea originates in India and China - you now, the former that we colonised partly to take advantage of this, and the latter that Britain maintained lucrative trade connections with throughout much of it's history.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    This might be bait but just to prove you're wrong:

    Pan Haggerty
    Melton Mowbray Pork Pies
    A traditional Sunday Roast is British - it was traditionally eaten on a Sunday after church services from the 18th Century.
    Spotted **** (lol).
    Sausage & Mash
    Cornish Pasties
    Yorkshire puddings
    Crumpets
    English breakfast
    Cottage pie
    English Muffins
    Bubble and Squeak
    Eton Mess
    Scotch eggs
    Piccalilli
    Toad in the hole
    Scones
    Afternoon tea
    Sticky toffee pudding
    Shephard's pie...

    The list goes on...

    We also have Anglo-Indian dishes such as chicken-tikka masala.

    This is also not mentioning cultural dishes that are native to the other home nations (i.e. NI, Wales, and Scotland).
    If its by Got Milk then its very much likely going to be bait.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Facetiousness aside, 5 of the list you provided are literally what I described.

    Also "picalili" is not a British dish, it's a *******ization of a traditional Indian dish.

    I'd also argue several of the other things on your list are variants of the same dish, and the idea that "afternoon tea" is somehow a "dish" is absurd. Plus, the drink of tea originates in India and China - you now, the former that we colonised partly to take advantage of this, and the latter that Britain maintained lucrative trade connections with throughout much of it's history.
    You do realise that's how most cultural food comes about - through interpretation, inspiration, and taking ideas from other cuisines to create your own. It has happened for thousands of years - people traveled, ate other people's food and came back to their home countries and said "hey guys, this food is good, lets make our own version".

    The thread states cultural food - not cultural dishes; so I thought both could be included.
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    HP Sauce. Don't know how the rest of the world copes without it.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Facetiousness aside, 5 of the list you provided are literally what I described.

    Also "picalili" is not a British dish, it's a *******ization of a traditional Indian dish.

    I'd also argue several of the other things on your list are variants of the same dish, and the idea that "afternoon tea" is somehow a "dish" is absurd. Plus, the drink of tea originates in India and China - you now, the former that we colonised partly to take advantage of this, and the latter that Britain maintained lucrative trade connections with throughout much of it's history.
    P.S. I don't think you even know what "afternoon tea" is as it is a meal/dish.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_(meal)#Afternoon_tea
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    P.S. I don't think you even know what "afternoon tea" is.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_(meal)#Afternoon_tea
    A meal is not a food, nor is it a dish.

    I'm aware of what it is, but tea is Indian or Chinese, versions of foods identical or near identical to scones have existed in many cultures as the basic idea of a quickbread that is made without yeast is not uncommon, and sandwiches are of debatable origin but it can be almost universally agreed that they're definitely not uniquely originating in England or restricted to England in modern forms of food. Also most modernly consumed pastries originated in continental Europe. Like, as a concept it's fine, but trying to suggest any aspect of it is purely an English invention and that it isn't simply a combination of foodstuffs co-opted from it's former colonies for the benefit of the imperialists is silly.

    Watching British people try and ascribe to themselves some greater meaning and culture on the basis of their imperial acquisitions in years previous is like watching Americans puff up their chests because they're from Boston which is FOUR HUNDRED years old, when there are many cities in the Middle East which have been continually inhabited for millenia (until the aforementioned American's imperialism desotryed the geopoltiical stability in the pursuit of unsustainable resources and cheap political power plays, and to prop up it's failing manufacturing industries through contrived wars).

    It's just so...déclassé. Have some self respect. Jeez. The social and cultural artefacts of Colonial and Imperial Britain are an embarrassment, at best.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    A meal is not a food, nor is it a dish.

    I'm aware of what it is, but tea is Indian or Chinese, versions of foods identical or near identical to scones have existed in many cultures as the basic idea of a quickbread that is made without yeast is not uncommon, and sandwiches are of debatable origin but it can be almost universally agreed that they're definitely not uniquely originating in England or restricted to England in modern forms of food. Also most modernly consumed pastries originated in continental Europe.

    Like, as a concept it's fine, but trying to suggest any aspect of it is purely an English invention and that it isn't simply a combination of foodstuffs co-opted from it's colonies for the benefit of the imperialists is silly.

    Watching British people try and ascribe to themselves some greater meaning and culture on the basis of their imperial acquisitions in years previous is like watching Americans puff up their chests because they're from Boston which is FOUR HUNDRED years old, when there are many cities in the Middle East which have been continually inhabited for millenia (until the aforementioned American's imperialism desotryed the geopoltiical stability in the pursuit of unsustainable resources and cheap political power plays, and to prop up it's failing manufacturing industries through contrived wars).

    It's just so...déclassé. Have some self respect. Jeez.
    So what you're basically saying is I cannot be proud of where I come from? Okay, thanks.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    So what you're basically saying is I cannot be proud of where I come from? Okay, thanks.

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    (Original post by artful_lounger)

    I'm asking a question to try and understand your argument - I didn't suggest you were arguing for it.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    I'm asking a question to try and understand your argument - I didn't suggest you were arguing for it.
    My argument is that you can't call something that is a product of colonialism, taken and co-opted from a culture which has cultivated that practice, convention, or whatever for often thousands of years, and claim that it is your own culture's.

    There's no reason you can't enjoy it. But don't go around trumpeting how it's quintessentially British and and example of the heights of British culture.

    I mean...most of modern Britain, culture or otherwise, is attributable to the Roman Empire anyway.
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    I love how so many British people make such a big deal of fish and chips and Sunday roast like they are something special when so many other countries around the world fry fish and roast meat and don't think of it as culinary excellence, just the average dinner.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    My argument is that you can't call something that is a product of colonialism, taken and co-opted from a culture which has cultivated that practice, convention, or whatever for often thousands of years, and claim that it is your own culture's.

    There's no reason you can't enjoy it. But don't go around trumpeting how it's quintessentially British and and example of the heights of British culture.

    I mean...most of modern Britain, culture or otherwise, is attributable to the Roman Empire anyway.
    That is a fair and well articulated argument, and I agree with it. However, I am not "trumpeting" it around how these foods are quintessentially British as you suggest. I have said they are a part of British culture - which they are.

    However, there are foods that are not a product of colonialism and are British. Such as the Yorkshire pudding, Pan Haggerty, Sticky Toffee Pudding, Shephard's pie, for example.
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    I think both steak and kidney and chicken and mushroom pies are great. Put them with mustard mash and you're good to go.
 
 
 

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