How have you made your choice?

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Democrat
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To those of you who are part of a political party/movement in the UK, how have you made your decision?

The confusion arises when you look at the main two parties. Unlike the Lib Dems or the SNP who have their goals strongly defined, Tories and Labour are both mixed bags. You could have easily joined Cameron's pro-EU Conservative Party to now find yourself in an anti-EU Conservative Party. You could also join Corbyn's socialist Labour to find yourself, in a few years time, in a centrist Labour led by Cooper and Ummuna. I am a centrist of sorts, leaning centre-left or centre-right depending on the economic and political events around the world, and so I do not think that I am suited for any of the parties right now. I do not approve of joining a party, uniting with a small group of other activists, investors and politicians, and trying to change the party when the majority does not want that.

My point is that I would not want to join a party and invest my time, ideas and hard work just to find out that the party is being hijacked by people with irrecoverably contradicting ideologies to mine, forcing the party to change into something that I do not agree with.

So, how have you made your decision to join the party of your choice?

Thanks!
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Rakas21
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For me the underlying factor that has kept me a Tory for the past decade or so (bar a brief flirt with the Lib Dems in 2013) is the economics of the party. As broad as the Tories are on secondary issues like the EU or social policy, i believe strongly in the market, in fiscal dicipline and in a sense of aspiration. Although there may have been elections when i would have swayed (perhaps 01 or 05 if i could vote) i have for the last decade or so had little reason to be tempted by other parties.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by Democrat)
My point is that I would not want to join a party and invest my time, ideas and hard work just to find out that the party is being hijacked by people with irrecoverably contradicting ideologies to mine,
But that is politics. It changes. You will also find your own views change over time as you move through life and your priorities change.

That said, despite the ebb and flow, Labour generally prefer to increase tax and invest in social entities like health and education and the Tories tend to cut tax and with it spending.

Issues like the EU and immigration don't really fit with either. If you are staunchly against immigrant and nothing else joing UKIP etc.
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Davij038
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Age and experience are the two biggest factors for me- having children and working especially shape politics (also where you work and whether it's public or private sector)

I started off my political journey as a Communist and now ten years later find myself a staunch conservative with mostly completely opposite opinions.

Always look at both sides of an argument and sometimes the most rational or logical argument doesn't work in practise or will lead to
Disastrous outcomes.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Davij038)
Age and experience are the two biggest factors for me- having children and working especially shape politics (also where you work and whether it's public or private sector)

I started off my political journey as a Communist and now ten years later find myself a staunch conservative with mostly completely opposite opinions.

Always look at both sides of an argument and sometimes the most rational or logical argument doesn't work in practise or will lead to
Disastrous outcomes.
You have fluctuated all over the place in the last couple of years, to draw any kind of trajectory seems silly.



Always had leftist emotions. The people who do the work should get the rewards. Although the history of projects like the Soviet Union lend a strong empirical case as to why it is a pipe dream.

But then reading about the Spanish Civil war convinced me socialism is possible and it is desirable in the form of libertarian socialism. Now it's just about latching onto whatever realpolitik positions moves things closer to those goals, no matter how small and useless it may seem. We live in a cage but do whatever you can to increase the size of the cage.

I also don't think capitalism works how a lot of pro capitalists say it works. For example, I think our attitude to propitiatory information is nuts. We have created the amazing ability to just duplicate stuff out of almost thin air and we have erected a load of restrictions and walls around this. Pirating a music record is not the same as stealing a car and if I could 3D print a car in my garage I would. I'm a leftist but much more libertarian than most self styled free market conservatives.

Information economy should definitely be ran on these grounds.

http://radgeek.com/gt/2011/10/Market...nd-Johnson.pdf
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paul514
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(Original post by Democrat)
To those of you who are part of a political party/movement in the UK, how have you made your decision?

The confusion arises when you look at the main two parties. Unlike the Lib Dems or the SNP who have their goals strongly defined, Tories and Labour are both mixed bags. You could have easily joined Cameron's pro-EU Conservative Party to now find yourself in an anti-EU Conservative Party. You could also join Corbyn's socialist Labour to find yourself, in a few years time, in a centrist Labour led by Cooper and Ummuna. I am a centrist of sorts, leaning centre-left or centre-right depending on the economic and political events around the world, and so I do not think that I am suited for any of the parties right now. I do not approve of joining a party, uniting with a small group of other activists, investors and politicians, and trying to change the party when the majority does not want that.

My point is that I would not want to join a party and invest my time, ideas and hard work just to find out that the party is being hijacked by people with irrecoverably contradicting ideologies to mine, forcing the party to change into something that I do not agree with.

So, how have you made your decision to join the party of your choice?

Thanks!
You're called a floating voter, if you want to be involved then put time into the candidate you want regardless of their party at any one time.
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DingusDongus
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Seeing as I have studied economics extensively, the only parties that have good economic policies are the Lib Dems and the Conservatives. I used to be a Tory, but since Brexit I've joined the Lib Dems, because I support globalisation more than isolation.
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Davij038
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
You have fluctuated all over the place in the last couple of years, to draw any kind of trajectory seems silly.
f

No, my beliefs have followed a consistent trajectory* until this year until I 'discovered god' (for lack of a better word) and discovered that rationalism has limits if we want to live in a moral society- this has lead me to obviously abandon my militant atheism and materialism.


*
2010- Commie
2012- Social Democrat
2014- Classical Liberal
2015- Neoliberal
2017- National Conservative

(Up until 2017 this has generally followed a trend gradually fully embraceing capitalism and libertarianism as I moved towards unfettered individualism. 2017 marked s turning point as I rejected this and moved leftwards and upwards on the political compass. I'm still pro capitalist but largely think a virtuous society is more important than a 'free' society)
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Democrat
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(Original post by paul514)
You're called a floating voter, if you want to be involved then put time into the candidate you want regardless of their party at any one time.
I'm a floating thinker I didn't vote Labour because, as much as I admire some aspects of their overall thinking, I don't approve of the mother-state which will feed people benefits and tell them that they can achieve anything in the world and that it's the world's fault that the citizens' lives are bad.

Then again, I didn't vote Conservative because they're not conservative and they do nothing of meaning to sort issues like housing, healthcare, education and national security. They haven't been too strong on the economics either in recent times, but better than anything that Labour could do in its current state of mind.
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