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    How did you study for your A levels?
    I got DDD and planning to take a gap year to retake.
    Anyone used CGP textbooks? Good youtube channels or websites?
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    (Original post by itsyrt)
    How did you study for your A levels?
    I got DDD and planning to take a gap your to retake.
    Anyone used CGP textbooks? Good youtube channels or websites?
    Did I use the CGP revision guides? Hell yeah. I used that thing to the point where I could recite pages out of it! It's a fantastic revision guide (emphasis on the word REVISION).

    What A-Levels are you doing? I might be able to suggest some resources depending on what you're going to study.
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    Did I use the CGP revision guides? Hell yeah. I used that thing to the point where I could recite pages out of it! It's a fantastic revision guide (emphasis on the word REVISION).

    What A-Levels are you doing? I might be able to suggest some resources depending on what you're going to study.
    Lol yeah sorry forgot to mention my A levels!
    I'm retaking Biology OCR, Chemistry OCR and Psychology AQA
    Yeah apparently the CGP textbooks are amazing
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    (Original post by itsyrt)
    Lol yeah sorry forgot to mention my A levels!
    I'm retaking Biology OCR, Chemistry OCR and Psychology AQA
    Yeah apparently the CGP textbooks are amazing
    I only did Biology out of those three so I'll tell you what I used.

    VBiology - Contains revision notes, past paper questions (old spec, but still relevant) sorted by topic.

    McGraw Hill - Has animations of biological processes/systems. Aimed at those studying for the American SAT/AP, but the science is correct, and sometimes gives extra nuggets of knowledge beyond what you need to know - but might prove handy later on.

    CrashCourse Biology - Biology videos. Not specific to any particular qualification, but the content in those videos are great and highly engaging. My teacher used these a lot in class.
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    For maths and FM, it was literally just past papers.

    For biology and chemistry it was concise notes from the endorsed textbook and CGP guide. I had gone over all the content by March and knew an overview. From March to May I focused on learning all the content and then did papers from May to my exams.
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    Maybe it's changed since I was at school, but if you memorise the CGP textbooks and do practise papers as revision then you will get an A/A*.
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    (Original post by Moura)
    Maybe it's changed since I was at school, but if you memorise the CGP textbooks and do practise papers as revision then you will get an A/A*.
    To be honest, as someone who just collected their A-Levels, I'm not sure it's changed at all.
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    To be honest, as someone who just collected their A-Levels, I'm not sure it's changed at all.
    Hi, did you get an A grade? or an A*? also would you say that biology is hard because i memorize pages upon pages and understand them but dont get high grades in exams...... can you tell me what im doing wrong? is it my exam technique also any tips personally for Biology
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    (Original post by Ninic)
    Hi, did you get an A grade? or an A*? also would you say that biology is hard because i memorize pages upon pages and understand them but dont get high grades in exams...... can you tell me what im doing wrong? is it my exam technique also any tips personally for Biology
    I got an A.

    Biology is hard because of the amount of content in the specification. The science is probably not too hard to get your head round compared to the likes of physics, but it's still fairly difficult.

    Pretty much all I did was memorize the pages and do past papers.

    May I ask if you are looking at the mark schemes carefully and observing which words are underlined? An underlined word in a mark scheme means that that EXACT word must be used in order to gain credit. That's very important, and you will soon realize that a lot of questions in Biology are similar, and by reviewing the mark scheme carefully you'll know what the examiner is looking for.

    Also, take a look at the examiner's reports after doing each paper. The awarding bodies gather how everyone did and identifies common mistakes that people have made in this document.
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    (Original post by itsyrt)
    How did you study for your A levels?
    I got DDD and planning to take a gap year to retake.
    Anyone used CGP textbooks? Good youtube channels or websites?
    I got A*AAB and mainly just practiced questions we would be given / past papers. Once you have the basic knowledge it's best to just practice specifically for exams.
    The A* was aqa psychology which is our common subject, that was doing notes throughout the year, doing the specimen papers then the questions in the textbooks. A lot of it is memory though, my memory is quite poor but I just naturally remember psychology stuff when in an exam so it was never hard for me.
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    I got an A.

    Biology is hard because of the amount of content in the specification. The science is probably not too hard to get your head round compared to the likes of physics, but it's still fairly difficult.

    Pretty much all I did was memorize the pages and do past papers.

    May I ask if you are looking at the mark schemes carefully and observing which words are underlined? An underlined word in a mark scheme means that that EXACT word must be used in order to gain credit. That's very important, and you will soon realize that a lot of questions in Biology are similar, and by reviewing the mark scheme carefully you'll know what the examiner is looking for.

    Also, take a look at the examiner's reports after doing each paper. The awarding bodies gather how everyone did and identifies common mistakes that people have made in this document.
    Hi, nice congrats on the A grade is that OCR? alright ill look at mark schemes also could i ask, what was your teqnique for revision and how early did you start memorizing (and going hardcore), did you make condensed notes in a note book, flash cards etc
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    (Original post by Ninic)
    Hi, nice congrats on the A grade is that OCR? alright ill look at mark schemes also could i ask, what was your teqnique for revision and how early did you start memorizing (and going hardcore), did you make condensed notes in a note book, flash cards etc
    I did AQA. Don't worry though - the resources I gave you can still be used.

    I probably started a month before the exams doing hardcore memorization, but I did papers across the academic year just to keep my mind up to scratch/to get used to the style of questions.

    I didn't use flash cards, I just kept on reading and summarising the revision guide on lined paper.
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    Okay i recently got my A Level Results and i got A*AA.

    I'm going to tell you how i got the A* because that's the only one i truly studied for. I got the A* in Law. I revised by literally making the most of all the resources my teacher gave me. I also used quite a bit of online resources from a website called elaw resources, but physics and maths tutor website does have a lot of chemistry and biology notes.

    I was never one for making notes or making nice little revision cards. All i did was read and complete past papers. I didn't ever bother marking them, i just looked at examiners reports.

    I literally believe examiner reports got me from an A to an A* in law
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    I did AQA. Don't worry though - the resources I gave you can still be used.

    I probably started a month before the exams doing hardcore memorization, but I did papers across the academic year just to keep my mind up to scratch/to get used to the style of questions.

    I didn't use flash cards, I just kept on reading and summarising the revision guide on lined paper.
    thanks im retaking, and i have a lot of people doubting me/telling me to quit and settle for my poor D grade in Biology but im determined to get an A, i was a really high achiever at GCSE getting A/A* in the science subjects until a level and something inside me is telling me i can do this
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    (Original post by Ninic)
    thanks im retaking, and i have a lot of people doubting me/telling me to quit and settle for my poor D grade in Biology but im determined to get an A, i was a really high achiever at GCSE getting A/A* in the science subjects until a level and something inside me is telling me i can do this
    That's the spirit. Never settle, keep on trying to get the best grades you can.

    Good luck with everything!
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    I got an A.

    Biology is hard because of the amount of content in the specification. The science is probably not too hard to get your head round compared to the likes of physics, but it's still fairly difficult.

    Pretty much all I did was memorize the pages and do past papers.

    May I ask if you are looking at the mark schemes carefully and observing which words are underlined? An underlined word in a mark scheme means that that EXACT word must be used in order to gain credit. That's very important, and you will soon realize that a lot of questions in Biology are similar, and by reviewing the mark scheme carefully you'll know what the examiner is looking for.

    Also, take a look at the examiner's reports after doing each paper. The awarding bodies gather how everyone did and identifies common mistakes that people have made in this document.
    My problem with biology is understanding the content. I'm good at memorizing every single word but when it comes to application I start chatting so much **** LOL. Guess that's why I got a D
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    (Original post by itsyrt)
    How did you study for your A levels?
    I got DDD and planning to take a gap year to retake.
    Anyone used CGP textbooks? Good youtube channels or websites?
    Hey, I'm in basically the same situation as you - I got CDD in German, Chemistry and Biology, and I'm resitting.
    I think one of the best ways to revise is with the website 'snaprevise' and past papers
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    A* In psychology, I wrote out all of my notes (over 200 word documents....), did extra essays, and made mind maps.
    For some of the more biological sides to it there were some good youtube videos that demonstrated the processes (e.g synaptic transmission) but for the most part I just memorised each theory/experiment/research method from going over my notes and answering questions!
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    Hi - I've just recently got my results and received A*A*A* so hopefully I can help!

    I didn't take any of your subjects but I can give a few general tips. You NEED to be organised, it's crucial otherwise there may be gaps in your knowledge and parts of the specification that you aren't even aware of. Get folders, print the spec, colour code it and let your notes correspond with it blah blah blah.

    Unfortunately what I did was a bit mundane but there is no avoiding - make notes from the textbook using one colour to highlight key info. I then condensed the info as I went along in two formats - in paper form on flashcards and then I made a powerpoint presentation for each chapter. I then tested myself with these flashcards throughout the year and made mindmaps for certain topics I couldn't get to stick in my head - until they did. It is then after this you test yourself with past papers without looking at your notes initially, and then when you get stuck refer back to your notes and write your answer in a different colour when you do this. Your aim will then be to do a past paper without looking at your notes at all Your exam technique I am guessing will be crucial in Psychology so finding a perfect/near perfect answer to each type of question will help bring that along - identify what they do and why it is good.

    Hopefully this helps, sorry if some things don't make sense as I am so tired haha
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    OCR biology is a demon. You need to UNDERSTAND the content and read questions and information they give you carefully (I took a highlighter in to highlight key bits). For longer response questions plan to answer quickly and then put pen to paper. Also a lot of the information in textbooks is unnecessary so a revision guide would be useful, I used this one:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/OCR-Level-B...ocr+as+biology

    As for YouTube, mrbiotom1 is OCR focused. Lastly examiner reports are your new best friend.
 
 
 
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