username3472184
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I remember doing my GCSE and trying to revise from those books and I simply couldn't. Too many jokes that take up most of the page and hardly any detail. Mostly bullet points. Why does everyone recommend them? Especially for A level when they require the most detail?
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That'sGreat
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The specification
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username3472184
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(Original post by That'sGreat)
The specification
I know but they don't give in much detail
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Aspiring123
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(Original post by MentalHealthN)
I remember doing my GCSE and trying to revise from those books and I simply couldn't. Too many jokes that take up most of the page and hardly any detail. Mostly bullet points. Why does everyone recommend them? Especially for A level when they require the most detail?
I used it for my AS and got an A in Physics
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the_nshoesmith
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They do tend to follow specifications fairly closely, but agreed, they're not perfect. Varies by personal preference and subjects
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President Snow
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I averaged 99% across four A-Levels (double maths, physics, chemistry) and used the CGP books extensively in chemistry and physics.

They don't, as you say, contain the full detail necessary to gain every mark. You cannot use them solely in order to attain the very highest marks. You use them in conjunction with everything else.

Textbooks take too long to read. Sure, I did read the official textbooks several times to make sure I covered every point in the syllabus. But for the purposes of rapid pace repetition and testing, your textbooks/full notes are too long winded.

Similarly, past papers are essential. As many as you can, again and again and again until you live and breathe the mark schemes and know the content inside out.

The CGP textbooks were for quick revision. Going through the whole book as quickly as possible (skipping over the jokes), start to finish, repeatedly, as often as possible, to make sure I don't ever forget a topic. I read the bullet point and think of the detail. If I can't remember the detail I look it up.

CGP are great. Not as your only revision material, but as one possible alternative/extra to writing moderately condensed revision notes. For me I had: Textbook > Full Revision Notes > CGP Condensed Revision Notes > Extremely Condensed Revision Notes, + Past Papers/Mark Schemes/Examiners Reports/etc.

I found them helpful.
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mightyfall
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Used a school book for my AS Biology and got a C. Used a CGP book for A2 Biology and got an A. Includes only the things you need to know for the exam. No bs.
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Hibiscuso
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I found the revision guides not detailed enough and I stopped using them after AS year. As a result, my grades improved a lot.
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BobLoblawLawBlog
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CGP books in conjunction with using the specification as a kind of checklist was my main form of revision for biology AS, and Chemistry and Physics AS and A2. I found them really helpful, and got fairly good grades. But I guess they may not appeal to everyone. It probably helped that I quite enjoyed the jokes. I still remember the page about cows in one of the GCSE ones. Good stuff.
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frostfly
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(Original post by MentalHealthN)
I remember doing my GCSE and trying to revise from those books and I simply couldn't. Too many jokes that take up most of the page and hardly any detail. Mostly bullet points. Why does everyone recommend them? Especially for A level when they require the most detail?
I agree with you that CPG books don't always contain sufficient details required for top grades for A Level. But for GCSE, I relied heavily on them and got A*s. What you should understand is that CPG books with their cringe-worthy jokes (which I actually loved) are designed for students age 15-16, who may not have the motivation to study rigorously.

Also, there is a reason they are called revision guides. They're only meant to cover basic points. If you're after something with all the details of the spec then you should be looking at textbooks.
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SFASPIRANT
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It's a guide. They're not there to teach you the course. They're there to help develop your understanding and knowledge.
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username3046368
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DO NOT JUST USE GPG... One of my friends swore by CPG, whilst I used them along with other much bigger textbooks. He sadly ended up flopping his A Levels whilst I got A*'s... I felt I had to warn you
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SpidgetFinner
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(Original post by PoliticsandP)
DO NOT JUST USE GPG... One of my friends swore by CPG, whilst I used them along with other much bigger textbooks. He sadly ended up flopping his A Levels whilst I got A*'s... I felt I had to warn you
I only used CGP for A level. I didn't even touch the official books - they're too big. I did Biology, Chemistry, Maths and got A*AA.
CGP + Past papers = Success baby
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username3046368
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(Original post by SpidgetFinner)
I only used CGP for A level. I didn't even touch the official books - they're too big. I did Biology, Chemistry, Maths and got A*AA.
CGP + Past papers = Success baby
Not trying to be big headed but I got 3A*, to be fair we both did well but I think the books give an extra edge
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SpidgetFinner
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(Original post by PoliticsandP)
Not trying to be big headed but I got 3A*, to be fair we both did well but I think the books give an extra edge
What subjects? I don't think they do - I'm sure if I wasn't nervous/was more confident I could have got A*A*A*
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username4964288
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GCSE stands for General Certificate of Secondary Education. Keyword 'general.' The most successful thing about the CGP books is that they distil information so that you learn the things that you need to know for the exam. Personally, with the CGP books, I have been doing fine, and I haven't been biting off more than I can chew. For A level studies, I do understand that detail is necessary but at GCSE level I believe that the CGP books are perfect.
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Nuttyy
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(Original post by hxnxy)
GCSE stands for General Certificate of Secondary Education. Keyword 'general.' The most successful thing about the CGP books is that they distil information so that you learn the things that you need to know for the exam. Personally, with the CGP books, I have been doing fine, and I haven't been biting off more than I can chew. For A level studies, I do understand that detail is necessary but at GCSE level I believe that the CGP books are perfect.
I'm sure OP doesn't need your help, considering the thread is 2yrs old.
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username4964288
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(Original post by Nuttyy)
I'm sure OP doesn't need your help, considering the thread is 2yrs old.
Haha sorry
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