Is A Level English Language & Literature considered a soft subject?

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eleanorfbrazier
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I'm debating whether to take English Lit or English Lang&Lit at A Level. I prefer the books etc that you study with combined English, but some people have told me that it's considered a soft subject. Is this true? Would it be better if I took Lit instead?
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by eleanorfbrazier)
I'm debating whether to take English Lit or English Lang&Lit at A Level. I prefer the books etc that you study with combined English, but some people have told me that it's considered a soft subject. Is this true? Would it be better if I took Lit instead?
There are no such things as "soft" and "hard" A levels. This misconception comes from the facilitating subjects list released by the Russell Group - A level students usually think subjects not on this list are somehow "soft" when in reality it is not about subjects being soft or hard, but rather which ones keep your options open.
https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf (see page 1).

As long as you are selecting subjects that allow you to progress into your university and course of choice, then it really does not matter which A levels you take.
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ReluctantWriter
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(Original post by eleanorfbrazier)
I'm debating whether to take English Lit or English Lang&Lit at A Level. I prefer the books etc that you study with combined English, but some people have told me that it's considered a soft subject. Is this true? Would it be better if I took Lit instead?
If you want to Eng lit at uni, my school advises kids to take Lit, instead of combined; it's not soft, per se, but both Lang and Lit are covered in less depth.
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username1620381
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Both are facilitating, but I think Lit is more respected than combined Lit/Lang.
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by 1998RF)
Both are facilitating, but I think Lit is more respected than combined Lit/Lang.
Respected by who? Your dog?
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by ReluctantWriter)
If you want to Eng lit at uni, my school advises kids to take Lit, instead of combined; it's not soft, per se, but both Lang and Lit are covered in less depth.
From the Russell Group's informed choices document:

"English ESSENTIAL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS English Literature or combined English Language & Literature (some courses will accept English Language).

USEFUL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS History, Religious Studies, a foreign language."
https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf

Both A levels are accepted, you can take the single subject or the combined version, it does not put you at a disadvantage whatsoever. Your teachers are talking out of their a$$es.
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username1620381
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
Respected by who? Your dog?
Universities 😂 at least that's what I got told when I applied for sixth form
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by 1998RF)
Universities 😂 at least that's what I got told when I applied for sixth form
Your sixth form are wrong I'm afraid. As I posted before:

From the Russell Group's informed choices document:

"English ESSENTIAL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS English Literature or combined English Language & Literature (some courses will accept English Language).

USEFUL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS History, Religious Studies, a foreign language."
https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf (see page 45 of document).

Both A levels are accepted by universities, you can take the single subject or the combined version, it does not put you at a disadvantage whatsoever in applications. One is not more 'respected' than the other.
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username1620381
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
Your sixth form are wrong I'm afraid. As I posted before:

From the Russell Group's informed choices document:

"English ESSENTIAL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS English Literature or combined English Language & Literature (some courses will accept English Language).

USEFUL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS History, Religious Studies, a foreign language."
https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf (see page 45 of document).

Both A levels are accepted by universities, you can take the single subject or the combined version, it does not put you at a disadvantage whatsoever in applications. One is not more 'respected' than the other.
But one is facilitating and one is not.
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by 1998RF)
But one is facilitating and one is not.
All facilitating subjects do is keep your options open as they allow access onto more courses if you are still unsure about which course you would like to take - facilitating subjects are not about subjects being "soft" or "hard".

Please see page 1 of the document or my earlier post https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf

"If you don’t yet know what you’ll want to study at university, there are some subjects which will keep your degree options open until you decide which course to take. This guide will help you to see which advanced level subjects — which we call ‘facilitating subjects’ — open doors to more degrees and more professions than others. It’s not about ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ subjects, but those which keep your options open."

As long as you take subjects that allow you onto your chosen course then it doesn't matter which A levels you take.
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_gcx
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No.
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hollyoliviax
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Take Lit by itself - it's a challenge but a lot more respected by good universities
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by hollyoliviax)
Take Lit by itself - it's a challenge but a lot more respected by good universities
Absolutely incorrect.

From the Russell Group's informed choices document about entry requirements:

"English ESSENTIAL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS English Literature or combined English Language & Literature (some courses will accept English Language).

USEFUL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS History, Religious Studies, a foreign language."
https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf (see page 45 of document).

Both A levels are accepted by universities, you can take the single subject or the combined version, it does not put you at a disadvantage whatsoever in applications. One is not more 'respected' than the other as both allow access to English Lit degrees at RG universities.
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hollyoliviax
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Not really because English lit is a facilitating subject for all Russell group unis and neither Lang nor combined is 😂
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by hollyoliviax)
Not really because English lit is a facilitating subject for all Russell group unis and neither Lang nor combined is 😂
You are clearly unaware of the purpose of facilitating subjects.

All facilitating subjects do is keep your options open as they allow access onto more courses if you are still unsure about which course you would like to take - facilitating subjects are not about subjects being "soft" or "hard" or respected or not respected.

Please see page 1 of the document or my earlier post https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf

"If you don’t yet know what you’ll want to study at university, there are some subjects which will keep your degree options open until you decide which course to take. This guide will help you to see which advanced level subjects — which we call ‘facilitating subjects’ — open doors to more degrees and more professions than others. It’s not about ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ subjects, but those which keep your options open."

As long as you take subjects that allow you onto your chosen course then it doesn't matter which A levels you take.

You could take English Lit & Lang, Sociology, and Psychology and easily get onto an English Lit degree at any top university if the rest of your application is solid.
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CinnamonSmol
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I was in the same boat as you and I checked different RG uni's and they consider Lit+Lang as facilitating so I think you're good.
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Cubone-r
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(Original post by CinnamonSmol)
I was in the same boat as you and I checked different RG uni's and they consider Lit+Lang as facilitating so I think you're good.
This is the list of facilitating subjects according to the RG (these subjects should be taken if you are unsure of your degree choice, it's not about soft or hard A levels):

• Mathematics and Further Mathematics • English Literature • Physics • Biology • Chemistry • Geography • History • Languages (Classical or Modern)

However, just because Lit & Lang is not on this list does not mean it's any less of an A level.

Please see this document (page 45) or my earlier posts https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf

Russell Group universities accept Lit & Lang A level not because it is facilitating but because they clearly feel it prepares students well enough for English literature degrees.
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returnmigrant
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What the 'soft subject' debate was all about was stopping kids taking 3 daft subjects and then realising these were essentially useless, and that if only they'd taken at least one sensible subject they would have broader options still open to them.

If you do 3 A levels in, for instance, PE, Accountancy and Media, then its effectively waste of time - if you substitute at least one of those with a more traditional subject (like English), then future opportunities will be much wider, not just in terms of Uni courses, but employment/apprenticeships etc as well.
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hollyoliviax
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(Original post by Cubone-r)
You are clearly unaware of the purpose of facilitating subjects.

All facilitating subjects do is keep your options open as they allow access onto more courses if you are still unsure about which course you would like to take - facilitating subjects are not about subjects being "soft" or "hard" or respected or not respected.

Please see page 1 of the document or my earlier post https://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media...ices-print.pdf

"If you don’t yet know what you’ll want to study at university, there are some subjects which will keep your degree options open until you decide which course to take. This guide will help you to see which advanced level subjects — which we call ‘facilitating subjects’ — open doors to more degrees and more professions than others. It’s not about ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ subjects, but those which keep your options open."

As long as you take subjects that allow you onto your chosen course then it doesn't matter which A levels you take.

You could take English Lit & Lang, Sociology, and Psychology and easily get onto an English Lit degree at any top university if the rest of your application is solid.
If you research it you'll see that it disadvantages an Oxbridge application and some colleges won't even look at your application at Cambridge. If you want to study English Lit, take it at A2 - you don't cover both thoroughly by taking combined. Combined isn't 'soft' but it was discouraged by everyone at schools in my area for those applying to top unis.
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soIiIoquy
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no such thing as hard or soft a levels

english lit/lang is good.
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