Biochemistry? Watch

guy321
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
So I was thinking to do biochemistry but now I'm having some doubts. I mainly like chemistry but I also like biology but there are parts I don't like such as the environment/ecosystem and plants

Some people say biochemistry is more biology based than chemistry? However, I don't want to do a pure chemistry degree because I feel like it will be way too hard/too much work and there are some parts of chemistry which I don't like - I feel like if I do 100% chemistry I will end up not liking it. (I would never have thought of doing a pure biology degree as that would be way too boring for me)

Could someone clarify this please? Thank you!
2
reply
jadder1224
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by guy321)
So I was thinking to do biochemistry but now I'm having some doubts. I mainly like chemistry but I also like biology but there are parts I don't like such as the environment/ecosystem and plants

Some people say biochemistry is more biology based than chemistry? However, I don't want to do a pure chemistry degree because I feel like it will be way too hard/too much work and there are some parts of chemistry which I don't like - I feel like if I do 100% chemistry I will end up not liking it. (I would never have thought of doing a pure biology degree as that would be way too boring for me)

Could someone clarify this please? Thank you!
Hi there!
I just finished my first year of the Pharmacy degree, we were taught a topic based on biochemistry and it was mostly Biology based with a small bit of Chemistry. So if your looking more towards Biology than Chemistry then Biochemistry may be a good option.
Hope this helps
1
reply
guy321
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by jadder1224)
Hi there!
I just finished my first year of the Pharmacy degree, we were taught a topic based on biochemistry and it was mostly Biology based with a small bit of Chemistry. So if your looking more towards Biology than Chemistry then Biochemistry may be a good option.
Hope this helps
Hi, thanks for your reply! Are you doing pharmacy at oxford?
I looked at the oxford biochemistry course outline/structure (lectures etc) and for the first year its mostly chemistry?

It would help if anyone doing biochemistry here on tsr could clarify. Suggestions welcome
0
reply
jadder1224
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by guy321)
Hi, thanks for your reply! Are you doing pharmacy at oxford?
I looked at the oxford biochemistry course outline/structure (lectures etc) and for the first year its mostly chemistry?

It would help if anyone doing biochemistry here on tsr could clarify. Suggestions welcome
Your welcome
No I'm doing Pharmacy at LJMU.
0
reply
aytuiq
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by guy321)
Hi, thanks for your reply! Are you doing pharmacy at oxford?
I looked at the oxford biochemistry course outline/structure (lectures etc) and for the first year its mostly chemistry?

It would help if anyone doing biochemistry here on tsr could clarify. Suggestions welcome
This sounds exactly like me! My passion is chemistry, however there are many parts of it that I dislike such as Quantitative chemistry and Physical chemistry - I prefer more qualitative based chemistry.
I also enjoy biology but prefer chemistry. Hence, I am split between applying for medicine or microbiology or pharmacy.
0
reply
guy321
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by aytuiq)
This sounds exactly like me! My passion is chemistry, however there are many parts of it that I dislike such as Quantitative chemistry and Physical chemistry - I prefer more qualitative based chemistry.
I also enjoy biology but prefer chemistry. Hence, I am split between applying for medicine or microbiology or pharmacy.
I was thinking about pharmacy but I don't really want to be a pharmacist.

I was thinking if I did the masters in biochemistry then for the 4th year I could do my masters in pharmacology (at oxford). However, I would like to know if the second and third years are mostly biology or chemistry or equally split?
0
reply
aytuiq
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by guy321)
I was thinking about pharmacy but I don't really want to be a pharmacist.

I was thinking if I did the masters in biochemistry then for the 4th year I could do my masters in pharmacology (at oxford). However, I would like to know if the second and third years are mostly biology or chemistry or equally split?
I'm not sure, however I imagine Oxford to have a more academic and perhaps more chemistry based course than other universities.
0
reply
Laura05Apple
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
In a biochemistry degree you will have some compulsory bio and chem modules in years 1 and 2, and then usually a few proper biochem core modules (ie energy metabolism). The biology you do in biochem isn't typical biology if that makes sense - ie you don't get to do any anatomy, evolution etc. The biology you would do in a biochem degree tends to be more on the genetics side of things. You don't get to do any 'big picture/macro' biology, only molecular/cellular biology. I just did a biochem degree and a couple of my optional modules I chose were cell biology of disease. We didn't do much to do with evolution (except evolution of proteins and of specific organelles etc). We couldn't do plants or anything like that, even if you wanted to.
The chemistry you will do will be mainly organic, with the opportunities to do more physical and inorganic chem likely coming in the 2nd and 3rd years.

I have just finished a biochem degree, which I I chose based on really enjoying and really excelling in biology and chemistry a level. Having said that, the biochemistry degree was nothing really like the 'bit of biology and a bit of chemistry' I expected; I had to do a lot more of the hard chemistry, and a lot more of the dull bits of biology and none of the biology I liked.

Also beware that you will have to spend a lot of time in the lab. In 6th form I enjoyed our 30min-1hr lab sessions every now and again so thought it wouldn't be an issue, but 3 and 6hr long labs are a whole different story...
1
reply
Laura05Apple
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by aytuiq)
This sounds exactly like me! My passion is chemistry, however there are many parts of it that I dislike such as Quantitative chemistry and Physical chemistry - I prefer more qualitative based chemistry.
I also enjoy biology but prefer chemistry. Hence, I am split between applying for medicine or microbiology or pharmacy.
I wouldn't apply for medicine just because you quite like biology and enjoy chemistry.
0
reply
aytuiq
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Laura05Apple)
I wouldn't apply for medicine just because you quite like biology and enjoy chemistry.
Why not?
0
reply
Laura05Apple
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by aytuiq)
Why not?
Because it is much more than just liking and being science. It is very, very vocational and competitive. It traditionally used to be the clever kids who were good at science did it because it was a respected career choice, but in today's world you might as well apply for something you are genuinely interested in and not just something you think you should!
1
reply
happiness12
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
Oxford requires A level chemistry for biochemistry whereas you only need biology to AS so I imagine it will be much more chemistry based than biology
0
reply
aytuiq
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Laura05Apple)
Because it is much more than just liking and being science. It is very, very vocational and competitive. It traditionally used to be the clever kids who were good at science did it because it was a respected career choice, but in today's world you might as well apply for something you are genuinely interested in and not just something you think you should!
I think of medicine as ultimately an academic degree, doctors need a strong academic founding. There are many medical specialties such as pathology and clinical pharmacology that are largely lab-based. Many medical/biochemistry researchers also have medical degrees. Hence, I am looking at universities with a strong focus on the pre-clinical years and an academic viewpoint such as Oxford.
0
reply
Laura05Apple
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by aytuiq)
I think of medicine as ultimately an academic degree, doctors need a strong academic founding. There are many medical specialties such as pathology and clinical pharmacology that are largely lab-based. Many medical/biochemistry researchers also have medical degrees. Hence, I am looking at universities with a strong focus on the pre-clinical years and an academic viewpoint such as Oxford.
Fair enough! That is just my opinion! I am actually applying for medicine now after foolishly not applying in 6th form. I love science but personally did not enjoy the biochem degree and have always wanted to do medicine and be more hands on. I did Biological and Medicinal Chemistry in my 3rd year (mainly pharmacology really) and loved it, and my Mum did pathology so I get what you mean about there being academic specialities for medicine. Just be wary that it is a very, very competitive course so applying for it with only really the academics/science appeal may hold you back when being compared to people who want to do it for the patient facing aspect too. Good luck!
1
reply
Laura05Apple
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by happiness12)
Oxford requires A level chemistry for biochemistry whereas you only need biology to AS so I imagine it will be much more chemistry based than biology
Usually unis do that because it is easier to get most people on the same level for biology in 1st year/easier to teach, than get everyone up to the same level of chemistry. A biochem degree will always have a fair bit of biology. Also, if you're saying you don't want to do a straight chemistry degree because it'll be too hard/too much work, I can tell you from experience that whilst the chemistry modules were conceptually harder to get around, I definitely had a lot more work and a lot more content to learn for the biology modules, so you need to weigh them both up.
0
reply
Okaythenyes
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by guy321)
So I was thinking to do biochemistry but now I'm having some doubts. I mainly like chemistry but I also like biology but there are parts I don't like such as the environment/ecosystem and plants

Some people say biochemistry is more biology based than chemistry? However, I don't want to do a pure chemistry degree because I feel like it will be way too hard/too much work and there are some parts of chemistry which I don't like - I feel like if I do 100% chemistry I will end up not liking it. (I would never have thought of doing a pure biology degree as that would be way too boring for me)

Could someone clarify this please? Thank you!
Hey I've just finished a biochemistry degree this year and honestly the amount of environmental and plant based biology I had to learn during my course was minimal, in fact on my first day I was keen to determine the amount of plant biology I would need to learn and thankfully my lecturer told me it was minimal. I honestly really enjoyed my degree, I did a lot more chemistry than that of the other life science subjects but also found that it was a good balance between the two subjects.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
reply
guy321
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by Okaythenyes)
Hey I've just finished a biochemistry degree this year and honestly the amount of environmental and plant based biology I had to learn during my course was minimal, in fact on my first day I was keen to determine the amount of plant biology I would need to learn and thankfully my lecturer told me it was minimal. I honestly really enjoyed my degree, I did a lot more chemistry than that of the other life science subjects but also found that it was a good balance between the two subjects.
Hi thanks for your reply! The oxford biochem course seems like a good balance between the two subjects. The first year is mostly chemistry but I'm not sure about years two and three? Is there any reason why oxford calls their biochemistry degree 'molecular and cellular'?

Also which uni did you go to?

(Original post by Laura05Apple)
Fair enough! That is just my opinion! I am actually applying for medicine now after foolishly not applying in 6th form. I love science but personally did not enjoy the biochem degree and have always wanted to do medicine and be more hands on. I did Biological and Medicinal Chemistry in my 3rd year (mainly pharmacology really) and loved it, and my Mum did pathology so I get what you mean about there being academic specialities for medicine. Just be wary that it is a very, very competitive course so applying for it with only really the academics/science appeal may hold you back when being compared to people who want to do it for the patient facing aspect too. Good luck!
I was thinking to apply to medicine but after my medicine work experience placement I learnt that I didn't like the hospital environment and seeing ill patients - I also feel like I won't really like dissections in the medical course. However, with biochemistry I don't want to be in a lab 100% of the time in a career/job and most people I spoke to said that if that was the case then I would need to do at least a masters which gives more freedom. I think if I did a masters in biochem at oxford then it would probs be something to do with pharmacology/pharmaceuticals. In regards to the biology side of things I enjoy learning about genetics and I think that would be quite interesting

(Original post by Laura05Apple)
Usually unis do that because it is easier to get most people on the same level for biology in 1st year/easier to teach, than get everyone up to the same level of chemistry. A biochem degree will always have a fair bit of biology. Also, if you're saying you don't want to do a straight chemistry degree because it'll be too hard/too much work, I can tell you from experience that whilst the chemistry modules were conceptually harder to get around, I definitely had a lot more work and a lot more content to learn for the biology modules, so you need to weigh them both up.
0
reply
Okaythenyes
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
I didn't study at oxford so I wouldn't know about the the molecular and cellular part although molecular and cellular biology was also a big focus on my course. But at my uni the first year was very similar to that of the biologist and biomedics, it was in the second year that I had to do biochemistry specific modules related to things like metabolism and enzyme kinetics. This specialisation also became more prevalent in third year were the modules I did were almost completely different to that of the other life science subjects.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Okaythenyes
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
Also sorry missed your last question. I went to the university of Kent and am now die to start a MRes in Cancer Sciences at Birmingham in September.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
guy321
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by Okaythenyes)
I didn't study at oxford so I wouldn't know about the the molecular and cellular part although molecular and cellular biology was also a big focus on my course. But at my uni the first year was very similar to that of the biologist and biomedics, it was in the second year that I had to do biochemistry specific modules related to things like metabolism and enzyme kinetics. This specialisation also became more prevalent in third year were the modules I did were almost completely different to that of the other life science subjects.
Oxford seems a bit different - the first year has a lot of chemistry but I'm not sure about the second and third years - could you take a look?

weblearn.ox.ac.uk/portal/site/:medsci:bioch:ug
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 3 Jul '19
  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Thu, 4 Jul '19
  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 20 Sep '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (67)
15.8%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (43)
10.14%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (80)
18.87%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (61)
14.39%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (46)
10.85%
How can I be the best version of myself? (127)
29.95%

Watched Threads

View All