Why do the media give the far-right a voice? Watch

FriendlyPenguin
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Edit: Sorry, wrong thread
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tomahawker314
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Well they also voice very socialist voices which are as degrading to the society. It is in the interest of balance and to inform the population.
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stoyfan
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
Consider Milo Y????polis. Professional troll, before raping those kids or whatever he did, he was a huge figure because he had mastered the art of getting attention through offending people.

If the media didn't talk about terrorism, how much influence would ISIS really have? If the media didn't talk about the far-right, how much influence would they have?

Here is an example:
https://www.vox.com/world/2017/8/15/...tesville-white

VOX news interviews a French far-right, as if his views are worthy of being listened to. They don't care about the damage that giving the far-right a platform to spread their hateful ideas is doing to society.

The media are happy to see the world burn, so long as they generate views and make a profit.
why do the media give the far left a voice?
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ThomH97
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The media should report what's going on. That is very different from sensationalising stuff to put on the front page to get more people to read it.

I understand why they do it, but that's the real problem, not merely reporting stuff.
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rugbycricket
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Some might argue that the media is actually quite restrained on certain issues despite the perception that it will publish anything for a quick profit. Hypothetically and in a world without laws, if the media began to include full, uncensored images of atrocities we face on a daily basis, many more people would begin to take the issue into their own hands due to the shock of not seeing a watered down view of reality. E.g. British press coining up the nickname 'Jihadi John' and allowing people to laugh at serious worldwide problems without even having an understanding of who ISIS are and what they want.

In most cases, it's not the amount of coverage which gives these people or groups a voice but rather what that coverage is. Especially given how easily information can be shared and spread online, people will realise very quickly when politicians and the media hold controversial things back and in the end, still find that information, perhaps drawing even more attention to it.
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ChaoticButterfly
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It's ok.

We got friendly interviews with actual Marxist on wingnut news networks now. Let the normalisation of left wing memes infect society XD

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imann
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
Consider Milo Y????polis. Professional troll, before raping those kids or whatever he did, he was a huge figure because he had mastered the art of getting attention through offending people.

If the media didn't talk about terrorism, how much influence would ISIS really have? If the media didn't talk about the far-right, how much influence would they have?

Here is an example:
https://www.vox.com/world/2017/8/15/...tesville-white

VOX news interviews a French far-right, as if his views are worthy of being listened to. They don't care about the damage that giving the far-right a platform to spread their hateful ideas is doing to society.

The media are happy to see the world burn, so long as they generate views and make a profit.
Why do the media give the far-left a voice?
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viddy9
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
If the media didn't talk about terrorism, how much influence would ISIS really have? If the media didn't talk about the far-right, how much influence would they have?

The media are happy to see the world burn, so long as they generate views and make a profit.
I share the belief that the media should be far more thoughtful about the spotlight they give to certain topics. Take Charlottesville: while I can understand why the media focused on it after the President of the United States made some ridiculous comments about it, they didn't just focus on it after Mr Trump had made his statements. They focused on it before it was even going to happen. They were playing it up for days, creating the impression that we have a huge explosion of neo-Nazism and white nationalism.

In reality, the alt-right, fascists, the KKK and neo-Nazis probably aren't that large at all. Mr Trump isn't going to usher in a new era of Jim Crow laws. Yet, they're now getting free publicity from the media, which in turn encourages the rise of identity politics on "the left", which in turn fuels the alt-right, and so on and so on. As Scott Alexander put it:

The KKK is really small. They could all stay in the same hotel with a bunch of free rooms left over...

Taking into account the existence of some kind of long tail of alt-right websites, I still think the population of the online US alt-right is somewhere in the mid five-digits, maybe 50,000 or so.

50,000 is more than the 5,000 Klansmen. But it’s still 0.02% of the US population. It’s still about the same order of magnitude as the Nation of Islam, which has about 30,000 – 60,000 members, or the Church of Satan, which has about 20,000. It’s not quite at the level of the Hare Krishnas, who boast 100,000 US members. This is not a “voting bloc” in the sense of somebody it’s important to appeal to. It isn’t a “political force” (especially when it’s mostly, as per the 4chan stereotype, unemployed teenagers in their parents’ basements.)

You're similarly correct about terrorism. Terrorist attacks remain statistically insignificant, and the media undoubtedly has a disproportionate focus on terrorism. We simply don't need three-day long coverage of the same attack, with the same talking heads on the news channels, all day long. Not only does it lead to overreactions and policy mistakes, it also gives the terrorists free publicity. Simon Jenkins was on BBC Newsnight after one of the attacks and explicitly called the BBC out on this.

Just a couple of days ago, somebody rammed into a bus stop in Marseille. It wasn't due to terrorism, but the driver was known to the police and possibly had mental health issues. Yet, we didn't see "Pray for Marseille" slogans being generated, or three-day non-stop media coverage of the incident. We didn't see a discussion about the "root causes" of this attack, namely mental illness, which could have led to a discussion about how mental illness is responsible for some portion of violent crime. There was no suggestion that we should declare a "War on Mental Illness", akin to the War on Terror (which would be welcome, given that mental health problems are a much larger problem than terrorism.) Yet, if the media and the pundits and the experts were consistent, they would have done exactly that, because they overreact to every incident of terrorism.

Bottom line is: the media are obsessed with clicks and views and money. There are so many things, much more important to the long-run trajectory of our civilization, that could be discussed, but aren't, because of our focus on a few hundred Nazis in Charlottesville or a few people killed by a terrorist attack. If every single car accident was treated as "breaking news", there would be much more focus on the prevention of car accidents, and any government program aimed at preventing car accidents would almost certainly be more successful than the laughable "War on Terror".
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