Removing virgin media cables at the end of my tenancy

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psrod123
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Trying to set up broadband for the house I will be living in, decided to get a deal that included broadband, tv box and a phone line.

After speaking to the landlord, he has told me that he's fine with Virgin changing the cables in the house if they need to, but it is my responsibility to remove the cables installed at the end of my tenancy, and return the house to it's original state.

My question is, would this even be possible? Has anyone had any experience with this in the past? I have tried to get answers from Virgin but they aren't very helpful.
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Stevo F
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Bit of a silly attitude from the landlord, what if the next tennant wants fibre optic too?
If there's any risk the landlord will try to withold part of your deposit for the fibre optic cables I would just get (cheaper) standard broadband personally...
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Dez
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Why would he want that? :lolwut: It makes no sense. If Virgin Media has the best deal for you chances are it'll be exactly the same situation for the next tenant as well, so once you move out they'll just end up running exactly the same wiring you just removed when they move in, resulting in a complete waste of time.

I'd suggest trying to talk some sense into your landlord, it's pretty unreasonable for him to expect you to do this. If that fails, you can just remove the cables yourself I suppose - you might need a blanking plate or two to tidy up any holes, but it ought to be a fairly simple job. You could also ask the Virgin engineer to not nail down the wiring he puts in to make it a bit easier for yourself when it's time to move out.

Also do note that the cabling is technically Virgin Media's property, not yours, so once you remove it you should return it to them. I doubt they'll really care that much though, normally they just ask for the modem back and that'll be it.
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psrod123
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(Original post by Dez)
Why would he want that? :lolwut: It makes no sense. If Virgin Media has the best deal for you chances are it'll be exactly the same situation for the next tenant as well, so once you move out they'll just end up running exactly the same wiring you just removed when they move in, resulting in a complete waste of time.

I'd suggest trying to talk some sense into your landlord, it's pretty unreasonable for him to expect you to do this. If that fails, you can just remove the cables yourself I suppose - you might need a blanking plate or two to tidy up any holes, but it ought to be a fairly simple job. You could also ask the Virgin engineer to not nail down the wiring he puts in to make it a bit easier for yourself when it's time to move out.

Also do note that the cabling is technically Virgin Media's property, not yours, so once you remove it you should return it to them. I doubt they'll really care that much though, normally they just ask for the modem back and that'll be it.
From the small talks we've had (through a third party) he seems pretty strict, I think he wants us to remove them just because if they're kept there and the next tenants want different cables then it may cause bother for him.

I've emailed the estate agents asking about the problems but I don't really expect a straight answer. If I tell him that I think it's unreasonable then I imagine it would come across as quite hostile and I'm trying to avoid that.

But yeah if it comes to it I guess I'll just remove them myself, although I'm not too sure I'll be able to remove the phone cables, I think that'd be pretty difficult 😂 I guess I could ask the engineer for some advice when removing them. Thanks for the help
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Dez
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(Original post by psrod123)
From the small talks we've had (through a third party) he seems pretty strict, I think he wants us to remove them just because if they're kept there and the next tenants want different cables then it may cause bother for him.

I've emailed the estate agents asking about the problems but I don't really expect a straight answer. If I tell him that I think it's unreasonable then I imagine it would come across as quite hostile and I'm trying to avoid that.

But yeah if it comes to it I guess I'll just remove them myself, although I'm not too sure I'll be able to remove the phone cables, I think that'd be pretty difficult 😂 I guess I could ask the engineer for some advice when removing them. Thanks for the help
Telephone cables are a different matter as the landline box is definitely Virgin Media property and they get pretty annoyed if a non-engineer tries to touch them, as it can muck up the local exchange.

So you'd need to get an engineer in to remove a phone line, but again I don't think that's something you ought to be dealing with. You are paying rent, you have a right to reasonable use of the house. That includes installing a telephone line if the landlord hasn't provided one. I seriously doubt he'd ever be able to recover costs for removing a phone line from the deposit scheme.
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jameswhughes
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Which cables does the house have already, and which are the new ones to be installed? Is either the Virgin Media cable box or the phone line already there?

You definitely don't want to be taking them out yourself, you'll make a mess! :lol:
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virgil1
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So virgin use two sets of cables, or did (it's been a couple of years since I had virgin)...

Twisted pair cable for the phone. This will go from the street cabinet to a "master socket" and from there on in the cabling will be whatever is in the house, this shouldn't be a problem as if the new tenants want to move to a BT/Openreach based setup OR or one of their contractors will come round and move over the lines as part of the installation cost (or this is certainly what happened when I moved to and from Virgin).

Co-ax cable (looks like high quality aerial cable but uses "F type" screw connectors). This is the "fibre" that virgin is always banging on about (no better than BT/Talk Talk etc as they just punt the connection over the phone line), it's not actually fibre until it gets to the Distribution Point or Cabinet unless you're getting FTTP (don't think Virgin offer it). This may well be a problem as it's a much thicker cable and IF virgin haven't already been in the property they will generally drill a rather large (15mm ish) hole from the exterior of the house all the way through the walls into the house, on top of that if you are getting multiroom they will probably drill holes in the interior walls and staple gun the cable to the skirting boards.

It's not a problem to pull co-ax out of a house, repairing the damage the Virgin engineer will have done, i.e. filling holes in interior/exterior walls is more difficult.
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psrod123
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(Original post by jameswhughes)
Which cables does the house have already, and which are the new ones to be installed? Is either the Virgin Media cable box or the phone line already there?

You definitely don't want to be taking them out yourself, you'll make a mess! :lol:
I asked earlier on, still waiting for a reply 🙄 think I may just cancel the virgin deal and get a standard broadband deal to avoid all this hassle
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psrod123
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(Original post by virgil1)
So virgin use two sets of cables, or did (it's been a couple of years since I had virgin)...

Twisted pair cable for the phone. This will go from the street cabinet to a "master socket" and from there on in the cabling will be whatever is in the house, this shouldn't be a problem as if the new tenants want to move to a BT/Openreach based setup OR or one of their contractors will come round and move over the lines as part of the installation cost (or this is certainly what happened when I moved to and from Virgin).

Co-ax cable (looks like high quality aerial cable but uses "F type" screw connectors). This is the "fibre" that virgin is always banging on about (no better than BT/Talk Talk etc as they just punt the connection over the phone line), it's not actually fibre until it gets to the Distribution Point or Cabinet unless you're getting FTTP (don't think Virgin offer it). This may well be a problem as it's a much thicker cable and IF virgin haven't already been in the property they will generally drill a rather large (15mm ish) hole from the exterior of the house all the way through the walls into the house, on top of that if you are getting multiroom they will probably drill holes in the interior walls and staple gun the cable to the skirting boards.

It's not a problem to pull co-ax out of a house, repairing the damage the Virgin engineer will have done, i.e. filling holes in interior/exterior walls is more difficult.
Hmmm I suppose I'll have to ask if those holes already exist, because this landlord apparently doesn't want us to change a single thing in the house.
And do they always use co-ax cable with fibre optic connections yes? I might as well just cancel it and get a standard deal, thanks for your knowledge
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virgil1
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(Original post by psrod123)
Hmmm I suppose I'll have to ask if those holes already exist, because this landlord apparently doesn't want us to change a single thing in the house. And do they always use co-ax cable with fibre optic connections yes? I might as well just cancel it and get a standard deal, thanks for your knowledge
My understanding is virgin always use co-ax in the house out to the street unless you get a leased line - still get decent speeds, 150mbs+ and all the tv stuff.

Just seems a bit of a con to call it fibre and it only be fibre part of the way (but they're all doing it so what can you do. )

When you say a standard deal do you mean with Virgin? I think they'll always have to fit it in the method above, but I'm not a virgin engineer so I can't tell you 100%.

If there is a BT line (or sky or Talktalk etc) you could look at Talk Talk/BT etc "fibre" (aka fttc - fibre to the cabinet) if it's available otherwise you might be stuck with Adsl which wouldn't be as quick as Virgin. Also you might struggle TV wise. The advantage of this would be less disruption to the property.

It's a pity the owner is wanting everything returned to original. Virgin installations aren't bad, in my experience the engineers are pretty sympathetic to the look etc of the installation and even if it gets disconnected when/if you leave the next tenant may well want the same again.

Maybe you can speak with the landlord direct and find out exactly what they will and won't accept?

I hope you get sorted.
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psrod123
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(Original post by virgil1)
My understanding is virgin always use co-ax in the house out to the street unless you get a leased line - still get decent speeds, 150mbs+ and all the tv stuff.

Just seems a bit of a con to call it fibre and it only be fibre part of the way (but they're all doing it so what can you do. )

When you say a standard deal do you mean with Virgin? I think they'll always have to fit it in the method above, but I'm not a virgin engineer so I can't tell you 100%.

If there is a BT line (or sky or Talktalk etc) you could look at Talk Talk/BT etc "fibre" (aka fttc - fibre to the cabinet) if it's available otherwise you might be stuck with Adsl which wouldn't be as quick as Virgin. Also you might struggle TV wise. The advantage of this would be less disruption to the property.

It's a pity the owner is wanting everything returned to original. Virgin installations aren't bad, in my experience the engineers are pretty sympathetic to the look etc of the installation and even if it gets disconnected when/if you leave the next tenant may well want the same again.

Maybe you can speak with the landlord direct and find out exactly what they will and won't accept?

I hope you get sorted.
Just a little update for you, spoke to virgin looking to cancel the service, after explaining why she did a few clicks and found that the house has all the holes and wiring necessary to set up without having to do anything extra.

She also told me that the house has had a virgin connection for the last 5 years, asked her to confirm it was the correct house twice and she stood firm. Estate agents told me that they hadn't had virgin in the house before, emailed them this morning asking for an explanation and their usual prompt reply still hasn't come 🙄 I get the feeling that the landlord is quite the proverbial, hoping we have no trouble but I'm going to take pictures of the house before I move in and make sure we don't do anything to jeapordise the deposit (which I thought was quite high)

Thanks for your help 😀
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IWMTom
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(Original post by virgil1)
My understanding is virgin always use co-ax in the house out to the street unless you get a leased line - still get decent speeds, 150mbs+ and all the tv stuff.

Just seems a bit of a con to call it fibre and it only be fibre part of the way (but they're all doing it so what can you do. )

When you say a standard deal do you mean with Virgin? I think they'll always have to fit it in the method above, but I'm not a virgin engineer so I can't tell you 100%.

If there is a BT line (or sky or Talktalk etc) you could look at Talk Talk/BT etc "fibre" (aka fttc - fibre to the cabinet) if it's available otherwise you might be stuck with Adsl which wouldn't be as quick as Virgin. Also you might struggle TV wise. The advantage of this would be less disruption to the property.

It's a pity the owner is wanting everything returned to original. Virgin installations aren't bad, in my experience the engineers are pretty sympathetic to the look etc of the installation and even if it gets disconnected when/if you leave the next tenant may well want the same again.

Maybe you can speak with the landlord direct and find out exactly what they will and won't accept?

I hope you get sorted.
FTTC or not, it's still miles ahead of the speeds anyone else is offering considering they're the only mainstream provider in the UK using DOCSIS3.
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