Casey17
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HiMy daughter is starting 2nd year A levels studying maths biology and psychology.. she wants to do study mental health nursing but we are so confused at the different routes she can take.. can she do an apprenticeship or does she have to go to uni?? Any help appreciated thanks x
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by Casey17)
HiMy daughter is starting 2nd year A levels studying maths biology and psychology.. she wants to do study mental health nursing but we are so confused at the different routes she can take.. can she do an apprenticeship or does she have to go to uni?? Any help appreciated thanks x
She would need to apply to university. Nursing is a degree-only career path. For school leavers, university is the only option.

There are apprenticeships available, but these are intended for people who are currently working as experienced HCAs or auxiliary nurses and require the support of an employer. There is no guarantee that an employer would be able to facilitate the nursing course so it is not a recommended option.
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paulbarlow
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they are trying to de skill nursing the folks that do the apprenticeship will be a mix of hca and second level nurses. thats like the old enrolled nurse. if your daughter can go to uni.
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Pennyjoann
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The apprenticeship for nurses will still lead to a degree and will still meet NMC requirements, the only difference is the funding.

Charlottes web is correct though you would need to be in employment and they need to support you, but I do reccomend it. I think student nurses should do a HCA role first before going on to train as a nurse because some people find it's not for them.

Hope this helps
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by Pennyjoann)
The apprenticeship for nurses will still lead to a degree and will still meet NMC requirements, the only difference is the funding.

Charlottes web is correct though you would need to be in employment and they need to support you, but I do reccomend it. I think student nurses should do a HCA role first before going on to train as a nurse because some people find it's not for them.

Hope this helps
Whilst the course is a good one, it is not a reliable method for people who are not yet working as a HCA. They would not be likely to find an employer willing to put them through the apprenticeship ahead of HCAs in that area who have been with the team longer. HCA work is great for experience, but it would be wrong for people to rely on doing an apprenticeship when the likelihood is they would still need to do the degree.For those who are experienced HCAs it is a useful option to explore, but for many, employers will not be willing to support this and they will have to do the full degree.
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Pennyjoann
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(Original post by Charlotte's Web)
Whilst the course is a good one, it is not a reliable method for people who are not yet working as a HCA. They would not be likely to find an employer willing to put them through the apprenticeship ahead of HCAs in that area who have been with the team longer. HCA work is great for experience, but it would be wrong for people to rely on doing an apprenticeship when the likelihood is they would still need to do the degree.For those who are experienced HCAs it is a useful option to explore, but for many, employers will not be willing to support this and they will have to do the full degree.
Yeah you are right, I think you just need to be in the right place at the right time. I recommend the apprenticeship route because I came into my NHS trust as an apprentice HCA almost 3 years ago and I'm being supported now by them to do my nursing degree with open university (which I believe from next September will be done under the apprenticeship funding.) For me it's been the best route to do it, but I've been lucky. I have seen student nurses come straight from A levels and they haven't liked doing the basics of care and realised maybe nursing isn't for them, that's the only reason I don't think it's the best idea. Even if you go to do the degree at a university I still think people should get some work experience in the field first.
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paulbarlow
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yes there are the odd one that dont like the basics but the skills they learn the thinking and why they do it is useful. better than being just taught the task. still with those a levels a straight nursing degree is the quickest. if you can get a hca role and if they will sponsor you leaves you dependent on others. and there are never enough places or funding. sisters/ward managers have pets that get the first options if your not in favour you stay an hca
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Pennyjoann
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(Original post by paulbarlow)
yes there are the odd one that dont like the basics but the skills they learn the thinking and why they do it is useful. better than being just taught the task. still with those a levels a straight nursing degree is the quickest. if you can get a hca role and if they will sponsor you leaves you dependent on others. and there are never enough places or funding. sisters/ward managers have pets that get the first options if your not in favour you stay an hca
This is true, there aren't enough places, there were 4 places to start this year in my entire trust. The ward managers here don't make the decision though, they have to agree to support you but they don't get to decide if you get a place or not, that decision is made externally by the university. Feel like y'all are being very negative about it!

I guess it comes down to what the OPs daughter wants. If she is dead set on what she wants to do and exactly the speciality of nursing she wants to do then going straight to university is the better and much quicker option. I've known I wanted to be a nurse since I was 20, I'm now 27 and only just starting my degree, for me personally I'm glad I've taken the time to gain experience and know what I really want. I went straight to uni from college, and it was a mistake. It's a personal choice and you live and learn I guess!
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paulbarlow
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very true penny. im not trying to be negative. ive just seen it at first hand. the ward manager would always put her favorites forward and stop others. it was blatant. no one could complain because people suddenly found themselves facing disipline for some minor error. one
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Pennyjoann
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(Original post by paulbarlow)
very true penny. im not trying to be negative. ive just seen it at first hand. the ward manager would always put her favorites forward and stop others. it was blatant. no one could complain because people suddenly found themselves facing disipline for some minor error. one
That's awful! I'm lucky I have a lovely manager, but I've certainly worked in places where management were...'corrupt'.
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username2447915
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My hospital is currently employing people directly for the apprenticeship - you don't need any work experience. Although it will take a very long time to qualify in comparison to doing the degree
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Pennyjoann
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(Original post by rnv)
My hospital is currently employing people directly for the apprenticeship - you don't need any work experience. Although it will take a very long time to qualify in comparison to doing the degree
is it 4 or 5 years for the apprenticeship?
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username2447915
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(Original post by Pennyjoann)
is it 4 or 5 years for the apprenticeship?

I believe it's 5 years but i'm not 100% sure
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clarevet
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Who is your employer please? My daughter is interested in the apprenticeship route but we can't find any openings when searching via the gov. UK website.
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Pennyjoann
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(Original post by clarevet)
Who is your employer please? My daughter is interested in the apprenticeship route but we can't find any openings when searching via the gov. UK website.
I'm employed by an NHS trust, they have been talking about doing the nursing apprenticeship, but this year they are taking on people to train for the new role of nurse associate instead.

Your best bet would be to check out your local NHS trust and see what opportunities they are offering
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clarevet
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Thank you.
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Weyinmi
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I do not know where you live in UK but tell your daughter to look for NHS HCA jobs with no experience in which they are willing to train you and support your progress in which no doubt if she is good at work and show commitment and make her interest know she want to be a nurse they will fund her nursing degree through open university or with other provider. This is what I did. See this link below of what I meant, read through it and you will see not much experience needed
https://www.indeed.co.uk/m/viewjob?j...57aa&from=serp
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clarevet
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(Original post by Weyinmi)
I do not know where you live in UK but tell your daughter to look for NHS HCA jobs with no experience in which they are willing to train you and support your progress in which no doubt if she is good at work and show commitment and make her interest know she want to be a nurse they will fund her nursing degree through open university or with other provider. This is what I did. See this link below of what I meant, read through it and you will see not much experience needed
https://www.indeed.co.uk/m/viewjob?j...57aa&from=serp
Thank you, that's really useful. She's just got a job with a care provider while she finishes her A levels so hopefully that will be helpful for getting a position as a nursing auxiliary.
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