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    http://education.guardian.co.uk/stud...295810,00.html
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Universities 'reject top medical candidates'
    They sure do. It's stories like these that really scare me as an applicant-having such an unpredictable future
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    Why don't they make offers based on AEAs if A-Levels are so useless?
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Why don't they make offers based on AEAs if A-Levels are so useless?
    AEAs are too hard, aren't they?! And dunno if all schools can provide them for the same syllabus. But I think the BMAT will become more popular amongst medschools in the near future.
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    AEA's would be too elitest. The good schools will do well. The run down, crap comp would lose out big time.

    Aparently GCSEs are a better marker of University success, and as such nearly all medical schools have put up their GCSE requirements for 2005. It will be interesting to see if it makes any difference.

    The BMAT is actually hated by a fair few med schools (dispite the fact is 'assays' at GCSE level) - hence the fact that in year one the BMAT site claimed that lots of other medical schools were considering implementing it for 2005 entry... It hasn't happened. There has been talk of entry exams though - a favoured combination seems to be a mix of academic and personality type questions.
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    i wouldn't advise many people to use a med-school place on the UCAS form for bristol this year.

    "Bristol was forced to admit an extra 50 students this autumn after being swamped with suitable candidates. Next year it is having to cut the number to meet its NHS-set quotas"

    our year (soon-to-be second) is very big as well. strange coincidence that the exams were extra tough this year and a record number of people failed first year (this year) so have dropped out.
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    (Original post by timeofyourlife)
    i wouldn't advise many people to use a med-school place on the UCAS form for bristol this year.

    "Bristol was forced to admit an extra 50 students this autumn after being swamped with suitable candidates. Next year it is having to cut the number to meet its NHS-set quotas"

    our year (soon-to-be second) is very big as well. strange coincidence that the exams were extra tough this year and a record number of people failed first year (this year) so have dropped out.
    lol harsh
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    alot of the problem is elitism. my friend at a comprehensive forecast AAB in alevels and had work shadowing with a cardiovascular surgeon didnt get in anywhere for med. my other friend at a grammar forecast ABC with no work experience got 3 offers.
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    I am so glad that I applied and am into medicine now I don't know if I would have got to the interview stage even if I was a bit younger. I think that as we have a shortage of doctors we need more medical school places so that more people who are capable of doing medicine can.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    AEA's would be too elitest. The good schools will do well. The run down, crap comp would lose out big time.
    But medicine has always been elitist anyway!

    You could hand out AEAs offers to the good school kids only. Then again, that would incur the wrath of the anti-social engineering people!

    You can never win.

    Damn. Bring on the benabots.
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    AEA's aren't really a good way of showing whether you're good in a subject or not. They are really random, and are not a reliable method, even in the good schools.

    For example, in AEA Chemistry, you need to be good at maths, not chemistry to do well. I couldn't answer the chemistry based questions well at all, but I could certainly do all the complicated maths based questions, which was most of the paper, which is how I managed to get the marks for a distinction. None of the other people in my class who took it with me managed to get a pass, but I would say that their chemistry is on the same level or a lot better than mine. That just goes to show how unreliable AEA's really are.
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    (Original post by whitecloud)
    AEA's aren't really a good way of showing whether you're good in a subject or not. They are really random, and are not a reliable method, even in the good schools.

    For example, in AEA Chemistry, you need to be good at maths, not chemistry to do well. I couldn't answer the chemistry based questions well at all, but I could certainly do all the complicated maths based questions, which was most of the paper, which is how I managed to get the marks for a distinction. None of the other people in my class who took it with me managed to get a pass, but I would say that their chemistry is on the same level or a lot better than mine. That just goes to show how unreliable AEA's really are.
    But many of areas of chemistry are mathematically based I am led to believe by ChemistBoy? Certainly something like Quantum Chemistry must be very mathematical.
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    AEAs are more a test of how much you've practised past papers, imo. I think they're a good idea in theory, but the lack of past papers and teachers experienced in dealing with them puts a definite bias towards public schools, with more access to the top grade of teachers.
    Angharad
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    (Original post by Angharad)
    AEAs are more a test of how much you've practised past papers, imo.
    All exams are like that
 
 
 
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