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    I am applying for Law next year, and I want to apply to apply to two of the London universities, but I don't know which ones. I am deciding between LSE, UCL and King's. I went to all three of the open days and I still have no clue.

    So what are the differences between the three of them? Which one has the best teaching? What are the people like in each of them? Student satisfaction? Accommodation? Seriously anything to help me out, thanks
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    (Original post by Sunset891)
    I am applying for Law next year, and I want to apply to apply to two of the London universities, but I don't know which ones. I am deciding between LSE, UCL and King's. I went to all three of the open days and I still have no clue.

    So what are the differences between the three of them? Which one has the best teaching? What are the people like in each of them? Student satisfaction? Accommodation? Seriously anything to help me out, thanks
    UCL/LSE are interchangeable. There's a difference in their location and the attributes of their students (LSE ones are more competitive on average, and more work/CIty oriented), but that's about it. The differences in everything from entry tariffs to student satisfaction to % in employment/education after 6 months to salaries after 5 years are too small to be meaningful. Visit both again, see what sort of uni accommodation they offer in the first year, look at the ordering of their course modules, gauge whether you'd enjoy the surrounding areas, and make a decision off that.

    Don't go to KCL.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    UCL/LSE are interchangeable. There's a difference in their location and the attributes of their students (LSE ones are more competitive on average, and more work/CIty oriented), but that's about it. The differences in everything from entry tariffs to student satisfaction to % in employment/education after 6 months to salaries after 5 years are too small to be meaningful. Visit both again, see what sort of uni accommodation they offer in the first year, look at the ordering of their course modules, gauge whether you'd enjoy the surrounding areas, and make a decision off that.

    Don't go to KCL.
    KCL is actually pretty okay if you get a scholarship. It's not that bad.
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    (Original post by jessjanellbhons1)
    KCL is actually pretty okay if you get a scholarship. It's not that bad.
    Wouldn't firm them based on a scholarship that requires A*A*A* to get. Not least because, if you miss it, you're still stuck at KCL.

    No one in their right mind considering UCL/LSE would go to KCL if they had the choice.
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    What's wrong with KCL?
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    (Original post by maisie22)
    What's wrong with KCL?
    Well, if you get a scholarship like I did, then there's nothing wrong with KCL. Lol

    It's just that UCL and LSE are slightly better ranked. I took the scholarship instead and now I'm in a top commercial law firm.
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    (Original post by jessjanellbhons1)
    Well, if you get a scholarship like I did, then there's nothing wrong with KCL. Lol

    It's just that UCL and LSE are slightly better ranked. I took the scholarship instead and now I'm in a top commercial law firm.
    No one doubts that KCL is good. It's excellent. It's just not as good as the other two for the 95% of the cohort that don't get in via DP's grant money. (Congratulations on getting it btw, I know people who got accepted but missed the grades)

    The interesting thing is that, salary wise, UCL/LSE will, on average (not trying to be deterministic here, this does not apply to all of their law students), cover the scholarship difference by having higher salaries for UK-based graduates 5 years down the line.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    No one doubts that KCL is good. It's excellent. It's just not as good as the other two for the 95% of the cohort that don't get in via DP's grant money. (Congratulations on getting it btw, I know people who got accepted but missed the grades)

    The interesting thing is that, salary wise, UCL/LSE will, on average(not trying to be deterministic here, this does not apply to all of their law students), cover the scholarship difference by having higher salaries for UK-based graduates 5 years down the line.
    Depends what scholarship you get. They have a number: including the Hafer Scholarship worth £30,000. You're not going to make back in 5 years.
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Wouldn't firm them based on a scholarship that requires A*A*A* to get. Not least because, if you miss it, you're still stuck at KCL.

    No one in their right mind considering UCL/LSE would go to KCL if they had the choice.
    Guess I'm insane then cause I picked KCL over UCL (Had offers from both).
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    (Original post by NotKidding)
    Guess I'm insane then cause I picked KCL over UCL (Had offers from both).
    Are you even a law student?
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    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Are you even a law student?
    No, but his comment was about the Universities as a whole, not just specifically Law
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    (Original post by NotKidding)
    No, but his comment was about the Universities as a whole, not just specifically Law
    This comment in the Law forum by a Law student might have been specifically for Law, ya know?

    Stop being precious.
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    From an employers point of view:

    All of them are much of a muchness in terms of the quality of graduates they produce. LSE tends to have a bit more "ego", UCL probably suffers a bit from the super rich mentality, and KCL seemed maybe a little less driven - but thats just my opinion based on my own experiences over the years!

    Most commercial firms target all three universities. From my experience, I had better connections with the law faculties at KCL and UCL, and had practically no relationship with the Faculty at LSE. But LSE had a fantastic careers service, and all my work with the university was driven through them. The UCL and KCL Law Societies were much easier to work with than LSE too (but that could easily change as it is so dependent on the President/Exec each year).

    The careers events at all three were pretty good.The legal careers fairs would easily sell out (and quickly) at all three and are now spread across 2-3 days for each uni, so enough employers can come on campus. Their law skills sessions or specific events for law were always pretty strong too.

    Differences:

    - LSE is a much smaller university compared to the other two. Namely where it has a much narrower range of subjects. Employers tend to get much higher numbers of non-law students from UCL and KCL because of this.

    - I'd say more LSE students follow the money and go into non-legal careers, particularly banking, although the growth of US firms in London has changed that somewhat.

    - LSE recently got a Bronze ranking in the new Teaching Excellence Framework, compared to UCL and KCL's Silver ratings. Now the grading system and framework could easily be debated, but it presents an idea of what the government thinks is quality teaching and outcomes. LSE was the only university in the top 25 university league tables that didn't get a Gold/Silver award for TEF.

    I am sure there are plenty of people who have been in their right mind who chose KCL law over LSE or UCL, and probably for a whole load of different reasons beyond general perceptions of how good a uni they are. Ultimately your chances of success are going to be driven by you as an individual rather than the name of the instituion on your degree certificate.
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    (Original post by NotKidding)
    Guess I'm insane then cause I picked KCL over UCL (Had offers from both).
    Nope, I was talking about law. This is the law forum. What people do or don't do in Engineering, Medicine, or Underwater Feminist Dance Theory is outside the scope of the question.

    (Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
    Depends what scholarship you get. They have a number: including the Hafer Scholarship worth £30,000. You're not going to make back in 5 years.
    To be fair, KCL has an intake of 330, and that scholarship is for one person. I was assuming (perhaps wrongly) that jessjanellbhons1 was talking about the Dickson Poon Scholarship, which is smaller in value and is awarded to around 30 students. That's the scholarship that really sets KCL apart from UCL/LSE, both of which have some (fairly generous) one- or two-person-a-year scholarships (KCL's are better).
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    This is slightly disappointing to read. I've just started the LLB at KCL this week and found my induction and first lecture (legal reasoning intro) to be extremely good, including Law societies, networking opportunities, careers/entrepreneurship services, and general reception from the faculty.

    The lecturers all seem interesting and reasonably dedicated, at least from the introduction. I'll reserve judgement on that, for now. Ultimately I'm here to work, be educated effectively, have my work marked fairly, and to be given adequate careers assistance, which I think KCL is likely to provide.

    I like the academic environment of the KCL campuses and the location - the Strand campus particularly. I ultimately consider KCL worth going to for Law as they have a pretty decent careers service and the Law department has improved over the years. However, if I had been fortunate enough to have the option to go to UCL or LSE I would have preferred them, more so LSE.

    I view UCL and LSE as equally prestigious in terms of graduate employment, but LSE with its specialism in social sciences does seem like the best London university for Law. I would have also preferred to go to LSE as I like small campuses with a smaller student body. You're less likely to have people there who aren't as driven and are potentially likely to waste lecture/tutorial time. However, at King's I have joined more varied societies that will allow me to cultivate a specialism in technology, the AppsConnect society and Entrepreneurship society in particular look great. Not sure if LSE provides these opportunities as they have a small campus and don't teach CompSci, Engineering, etc.

    What's ironic is that I met the requirements at A-level for LSE and UCL - A*A*A. I was also eligible for the DP scholarship but I unfortunately ended up applying to university in a very unorthodox fashion, due to various unpleasant reasons, including health issues that required me to have a relatively serious operation during my A-levels. The university application process took a necessary back seat in my life, but my A-levels did not, and it is rather a shame that as a result of this I wouldn't have been considered eligible at the time of interviews (didn't apply to either LSE/UCL), despite my demonstrated intellectual capability.

    I would also like to raise the point that it is rather disproportionate that those who choose 'easier' A-levels such as Sociology, English Literature and so on will be more likely to achieve A*s (and henceforth be accepted by a 'top' university) than someone who chooses more difficult subjects like History or Psychology. Universities such as LSE, Oxford, UCL and so on would be better off taking subject choices into consideration as, to me, someone who has managed to do well in History/Psychology at A-level - considering the way these two are marked - would perhaps be better equipped to handle the demands of a law course than someone who has done sociology.

    I mean no offence to those who have done so, I'm sure it's just as content heavy. I myself also chose an 'easier' A-level - I found Philosophy and Ethics a ridiculously easy subject in which to achieve full marks or an A* overall compared to History. I feel that students who choose harder A-levels in order to challenge their intellect rather than meet requirements are let down by this when it comes to the majority of university applications.

    I find our internal rankings of these top London unis in terms of their student body to be somewhat ludicrous as so much of a degree is, and should be, self-motivated. Paying £9250 a year should guarantee us the best faculties, the best teaching and the best careers opportunities. That should be the purpose of a university, not the ideological minefield many of them are becoming. Overall, however, our grades are due to our own hard effort, understanding and indeed respect for the academic discipline. Doing any subject as degree level without a natural aptitude for it is what concerns me, as so many students end up in this situation due to pressure from schools and parents. This situation can occur at any university.



    TL;DR: The implication/employer perspective that a 1:1 at LSE is better than a 1:1 at King's saddens me somewhat, but I don't consider myself less intelligent than those at LSE/UCL because of it. Quite the opposite, in fact, though I accept that the LSE course is more challenging and I would have liked to have done it myself (will probably apply for an intercollegiate module in third year). Successful LSE/UCL applicants may have been more fortunate than me in their teachers, in the subjects they chose at A-level, in how uninterrupted their A-level experience was, and so on.

    But that's about it. Employers should be on the lookout for the best person for the job, and as university acceptance is somewhat arbitrary these days, I think that internships/work experience/practical skills are rightfully becoming far more important than where you got your degree. (Not advocating that anyone goes to a low-ranked university. I hope that what I've illustrated here is precisely why you should not.)
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    (Original post by MelTranfield)

    TL;DR: The implication/employer perspective that a 1:1 at LSE is better than a 1:1 at King's saddens me somewhat
    No employer thinks a first from LSE is better than a first from KCL.

    The only people that think this are some LSE alumni who are trying to elivate their position by continuing to vocalise these myths (people from other universities are also guilty of this though).
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    No employer thinks a first from LSE is better than a first from KCL.

    The only people that think this are some LSE alumni who are trying to elivate their position by continuing to vocalise these myths (people from other universities are also guilty of this though).
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Wouldn't firm them based on a scholarship that requires A*A*A* to get. Not least because, if you miss it, you're still stuck at KCL.

    No one in their right mind considering UCL/LSE would go to KCL if they had the choice.
    Can you at least provide any concrete argument or evidence why you think KCL is out of the class of these universities for Law?

    From all indicators I have seen they all seem to be in the same league for Law, so if KCL is throwing in a scholarship on top of this, then surely it is not only on par, it is edging it.
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    (Original post by RoyalBeams)
    Can you at least provide any concrete argument or evidence why you think KCL is out of the class of these universities for Law?

    From all indicators I have seen they all seem to be in the same league for Law, so if KCL is throwing in a scholarship on top of this, then surely it is not only on par, it is edging it.
    Read the thread again
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Read the thread again
    I read it again, still can't see any concrete arguments or evidence from you.

    Can you point me to it?
 
 
 
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