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    Hey everyone who is kind enough to look at this post-
    I need some advice of GCSE French.
    I am taking it, but it is the subject I worry the most about!
    Even though I have above-average grades and always try my best I still get very anxious about it! I need some advice on what I can do to help put my mind at rest, and get a head-start to ease my worry.
    The main reason I get anxious about French is memorisation; my spelling and grammar is usually very good, and so is my vocabulary, however, once I'm made to memorise it I always worry I won't be able to fully, or will miss out words/phrases.
    Last year I'd prepared an oral speech to give, but once I was standing up in front of the class my mind blanked and I stood there stuttering while everyone watched me...
    This has contributed to my anxiousness about French, and I worry it will happen again

    I also need some listening tips. Once listening I can make out most of what is being said, but miss some parts due to the fluency and accent. What are some ways I can deal with this?

    Thanks to anyone who replies! x
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    Download a french radio app, it will help your fluency, pronunciation and listening skills. Also the book Mot à Mot is very useful for learning vocabulary Good luck, you'll be fine!
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    (Original post by TheTiger_)
    Hey everyone who is kind enough to look at this post-
    I need some advice of GCSE French.
    I am taking it, but it is the subject I worry the most about!
    Even though I have above-average grades and always try my best I still get very anxious about it! I need some advice on what I can do to help put my mind at rest, and get a head-start to ease my worry.
    The main reason I get anxious about French is memorisation; my spelling and grammar is usually very good, and so is my vocabulary, however, once I'm made to memorise it I always worry I won't be able to fully, or will miss out words/phrases.
    Last year I'd prepared an oral speech to give, but once I was standing up in front of the class my mind blanked and I stood there stuttering while everyone watched me...
    This has contributed to my anxiousness about French, and I worry it will happen again

    I also need some listening tips. Once listening I can make out most of what is being said, but miss some parts due to the fluency and accent. What are some ways I can deal with this?

    Thanks to anyone who replies! x
    Hi sounds similar to me I went each week after school to talk (in French) for 10 mins with my teacher about a random topic. This meant that my French became more fluent and less memorised. From this I became less worried about getting everything exactly right as I knew if I forgot a line or word I would have alternatives so I could improvise and this helped build confidence. If you know anyone taking a level or native speakers this might be an option.

    In terms of listening try films and TV shows. There's a great French show on Netflix called call my agent which you can watch with English or French subtitles. Although the vocab isn't directly linked to GCSE it helps get a feel for accents. Good luck, any further questions just ask.
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    (Original post by TheTiger_)
    Hey everyone who is kind enough to look at this post-
    I need some advice of GCSE French.
    I am taking it, but it is the subject I worry the most about!
    Even though I have above-average grades and always try my best I still get very anxious about it! I need some advice on what I can do to help put my mind at rest, and get a head-start to ease my worry.
    The main reason I get anxious about French is memorisation; my spelling and grammar is usually very good, and so is my vocabulary, however, once I'm made to memorise it I always worry I won't be able to fully, or will miss out words/phrases.
    Last year I'd prepared an oral speech to give, but once I was standing up in front of the class my mind blanked and I stood there stuttering while everyone watched me...
    This has contributed to my anxiousness about French, and I worry it will happen again

    I also need some listening tips. Once listening I can make out most of what is being said, but miss some parts due to the fluency and accent. What are some ways I can deal with this?

    Thanks to anyone who replies! x
    Moved to foreign languages study help

    First of all, if you don't like memorising stuff, don't do it! I got full UMS in GCSE French this year, and I memorised absolutely nothing. What are you concerned about memorising? If you're just worried about memorising vocab, the best way to learn vocab is through use; the internet makes it really easy to read blogs, newspapers etc. in French, and there are a couple of resources here for reading practice. Don't feel any pressure to memorise your coursework; if your grammar and vocab is good but your memory isn't, it would be much better to jot down ideas in bullet point form of what you want to say/write and then make up the actual phrasing on the spot; that way, you won't be totally reliant on your memory, and you'll practise French in a more realistic scenario (I mean, it's not as if you're going to have a script prepared if you're lost in Paris one day).

    I suppose speaking is just a matter of boosting your confidence in general. I'd reiterate the point about not necessarily memorising your speech word-for-word so that you don't rely on your memory too much. In general, if you're speaking in public, a useful thing to do is just to imagine you're having a one-to-one chat with someone, trying to narrate an event to them or convince them of something, and forget how many people are watching.

    As for listening, that only gets better with practice; YouTube is the place to go for listening practice IMO (and it will make the French listening recordings sound ridiculously slow). You might not understand much at first, so you can try watching with closed captions on, and you will improve over time. When you're in the listening exam, try to break down what's being said and focus on the most useful/telling words. When the recording is repeated, it's a good time to try to pick out the words you think are the most important.
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    Thanks for the speedy suggestions everyone! They really help!Unfortunately I don't have to option to go speak French after school every week, but that sounds like a great idea! I wonder if there's a way I'd be able to do that ? Bring it up with the teacher? Get a tutor?As for memorisation,When important written tests come up I know the question pre-hand, therefore I come up with a script, perfecting it then memorsing. Once I've written out what I'd memorised, then I free-style it until 5 minutes before the rnd when I go back and refine.I've also just purchased mot-a-mot for this year! How would you suggest I begin to learn the vocab?I'll definitely download a french radio app, suggestions?Thanks again to everyone x
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    (Original post by TheTiger_)
    Thanks for the speedy suggestions everyone! They really help!Unfortunately I don't have to option to go speak French after school every week, but that sounds like a great idea! I wonder if there's a way I'd be able to do that ? Bring it up with the teacher? Get a tutor?As for memorisation,When important written tests come up I know the question pre-hand, therefore I come up with a script, perfecting it then memorsing. Once I've written out what I'd memorised, then I free-style it until 5 minutes before the rnd when I go back and refine.I've also just purchased mot-a-mot for this year! How would you suggest I begin to learn the vocab?I'll definitely download a french radio app, suggestions?Thanks again to everyone x
    You could bring it up with the teacher; at my school, from Year 11 onwards we get oral "lessons" in French during lunchtime or a free period and at one point I couldn't make my assigned lunchtime, so my teacher asked me to come after school and it was amazing. We would just chat in French for a solid hour, one to one. It felt like a supervision ❤ so I would definitely recommend that you try doing something like that! Also, if memorising doesn't work for you, there is no need to do it even if you get the question beforehand. I mostly improvised but back when my French wasn't as confident, I would write down bullet points just so that I had a rough idea of what I wanted to say. That decreases the memorisation burden.
 
 
 
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