jawads
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#1
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#1
I hope somebody can help me with this query.

I want to do economics at university and want to know what kind of work experience you can do to stonger your application. What types of places would you do it in etc. And if anybody has done it before and where they have done it.

Bear in mind i live in the north.

Thanks
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Paulwhy
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IMO there is no good work experience for doing undergraduate Economics. However, good experience would be:
i)reading economics books: economic ideas
ii)travelling: see different countries with different economies.
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username141550
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#3
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I've got a work experience week/two weeks next spring at UBS. I don't know how much it will/has help me/my application, but it's no doubt better than nothing. But I think Paul is right, it's more important to read some decent economics books - takes you away from the dullness of A-Level Economics, and visit some countries that are interesting economically (i.e. are rapidly growing). I'm going to Eastern and Central Europe next July (assuming I earn enough) for this very reason.

If you did want work experience living in Northern England may be a bit tricky, simply because most of the relavent firms are gathered around London - though I don't really know.
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Paulwhy
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I agree with Dan-Iw. To me work experience with a financial institution would be of more benefit in terms of getting future internships and jobs after an economics degree rather than getting into an economics course in the first place.
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Jimi Haze
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(Original post by Dan-IW)
I've got a work experience week/two weeks next spring at UBS. I don't know how much it will/has help me/my application, but it's no doubt better than nothing. But I think Paul is right, it's more important to read some decent economics books - takes you away from the dullness of A-Level Economics, and visit some countries that are interesting economically (i.e. are rapidly growing). I'm going to Eastern and Central Europe next July (assuming I earn enough) for this very reason.

If you did want work experience living in Northern England may be a bit tricky, simply because most of the relavent firms are gathered around London - though I don't really know.
Just don't mention Nazi Gold whilst you're there...

I did a few days at a City private banking firm in half term (SocGen) - was really interesting, maybe not specifically related to Economics, more of stocks and shares etc which was really interesting. I guess the best thing, as stated would be to read the business sections of broadsheets and some books (but not as extreme as The Wealth of NAtions lol....I tried.......it's hard). David Smith (works for the Times) wrote a book called 'There's no Such thing as a free lunch' which covers basic Economic stuff but also has some very interesting things in relation to famous economists and their thoughts in enough detail to talk about....but not enough to get bored silly and know what was their favourite desert wine
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username141550
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I have a problem with potential top ten university students reading books like The Undercover Economist, Freakonomics and this Free Lunch book. You should read those sorts of books when you just start AS levels, or when deciding whether to take Economics at A-Level. Maybe The Wealth of Nations is a bit too much, I just struggled through it, but certainly if you're hoping to get to a very decent uni, and are likely to mention the books you've read in your PS, it should be more substantial. As I'm mainly interested in development economics, that is where my reading has focused and there are plenty of books that are easy and very interesting to read in this field, and doubtless in other areas where you are interested.

Thanks for the advice Jimi :p: I'd be surprised if it came up though
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Jimi Haze
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Hmmm two of the above books I mentioned in my PS and managed to get offers from Bristol and Exeter already....with an interview at Oxford tomorrow. That said I doubt I'll refer to them much at all, mainly just for bits about getting an interest + how it can be applied to really diverse situations.

Best bit is to keep up to date, remember that in most cases Unis don't expect you to have a knowledge of Economics beforehand and even Oxford state it's not necessary, just a knowledge of current affairs
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Paulwhy
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(Original post by Dan-IW)
I have a problem with potential top ten university students reading books like The Undercover Economist, Freakonomics and this Free Lunch book. You should read those sorts of books when you just start AS levels, or when deciding whether to take Economics at A-Level. Maybe The Wealth of Nations is a bit too much, I just struggled through it, but certainly if you're hoping to get to a very decent uni, and are likely to mention the books you've read in your PS, it should be more substantial. As I'm mainly interested in development economics, that is where my reading has focused and there are plenty of books that are easy and very interesting to read in this field, and doubtless in other areas where you are interested.
My experience is that I have to drag any indication of economic understanding out of people. i.e. in about 90% of examples applicants say what books they read but are weak at showing understanding or managing to sound like an economist. Hence it not so important what book(s) you reference but how you use them.
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falls_whisper
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Bank? Although it took me ages to find a placement since most high st bank don't take on A-Level students. Managed to secure a placement at my local Barclays in the end though , I showed "initiative" supposedly in that I actually revisited them and asked for a reply (in a polite way)

I'd say work experience is qute important, because it shows you've done something to reaffirm your dedication to economics. I actually gave up my holiday (which costed me £135 in the end) to secure I had something.

Try also applying to some investment banks, they tend to have one/two day programmes which are pretty good. Although they are generally tended to focus on women... I went to Goldman Sachs, and I know some people who's been to Merrill Lynch.

Good luck!
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SMURF007
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Is it enough to read books about economy to get into a like top 5 uni without the actualy a level!
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Easywellyes
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(Original post by SMURF007)
Is it enough to read books about economy to get into a like top 5 uni without the actualy a level!
¿ɥsılƃuǝ uı ʞɐǝds oʇ ɥƃnouǝ ʇı sı
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.ACS.
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(Original post by SMURF007)
Is it enough to read books about economy to get into a like top 5 uni without the actualy a level!
:laugh: - Seriously, you honestly think you can get into a top five university for an extremely competitive subject without a single A-Level?! :rolleyes:
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Paulwhy
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(Original post by .ACS.)
Image - Seriously, you honestly think you can get into a top five university for an extremely competitive subject without a single A-Level?! Image
I think what Smurf is trying to say is that he is doing A-levels just not economics.
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Deipnosophist123
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(Original post by .ACS.)
:laugh: - Seriously, you honestly think you can get into a top five university for an extremely competitive subject without a single A-Level?! :rolleyes:

Oh dear...
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cgreen
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#15
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jimi you mentioned that u got a call from oxford, did they offer u a place? what grades do u need to get into oxford for an economics degree?
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theonlyj
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(Original post by smurf007)
is it enough to read books about economy to get into a like top 5 uni without the actualy a level!
:d:d:d:d:d:d:d:d:d
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999tigger
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#17
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#17
You cna spin most work experience effectively towards your degree, so i wouldnt worry too much about being in the north.
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malayalee123
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#18
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Hi i was wondering if anyone has got into any good universities to study economics and any tips they have
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harry agyemang
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Paulwhy)
My experience is that I have to drag any indication of economic understanding out of people. i.e. in about 90% of examples applicants say what books they read but are weak at showing understanding or managing to sound like an economist. Hence it not so important what book(s) you reference but how you use them.
you have any reference from which we can any books for better understanding
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harry agyemang
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#20
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(Original post by malayalee123)
Hi i was wondering if anyone has got into any good universities to study economics and any tips they have
yes i think economics would easier only when you read and read "out side the box"
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