Anonymous1502
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While I seen some people say it is well respected what are the employment prospects?I seen people say patent attorney and finance and stuff like that, but what jobs are there that you MUST have a chemistry degree in order to do it and is well paid?I don't see a point of doing chemistry and then going in to finance or a job not related to it.Im considering chemistry as a job but I want to know more about prospects.
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DrSebWilkes
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Some people do politics at university and end up being a manager or something. They enjoyed the degree and the degree is something that opens doors that a "normal" person doesn't have.

For Chemistry, there are chemistry jobs out there (chemical industry; R&D project manager etc.) that pay well above national median salaries which should lead to a good lifestyle.

What you're saying is "eughh this degree doesn't make me a millionaire therefore it's not worth it"
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by DrSebWilkes)
Some people do politics at university and end up being a manager or something. They enjoyed the degree and the degree is something that opens doors that a "normal" person doesn't have.

For Chemistry, there are chemistry jobs out there (chemical industry; R&D project manager etc.) that pay well above national median salaries which should lead to a good lifestyle.

What you're saying is "eughh this degree doesn't make me a millionaire therefore it's not worth it"
That is not what I'm saying!If I invest all my time and interest into a degree,I want a job that has something to do with it and earns well at least 50 k.I'm not going to be spending 9,250 gbp per year plus other costs and the degree has no use!!
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iElvendork
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If you're going into chemistry for the money then you may be disappointed depending on where you go for jobs
And if you want to go into patent law, then a science degree is very preferable
Quite a lot of my friends graduated this summer and they've gone into different roles, they didn't start their degree in chemistry with the intention of going into finance etc. but whilst doing their degree they found what their best skills were and decided where they wanted their career to go
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DrSebWilkes
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
That is not what I'm saying!If I invest all my time and interest into a degree,I want a job that has something to do with it and earns well at least 50 k.I'm not going to be spending 9,250 gbp per year plus other costs and the degree has no use!!

People will spend that money and you get some arbitrary student debt out of it (which isn't the same as, say, a credit card) but doing something they love hoping to either A) Continue in the field B) Use the experience of that field in getting a job.

So in all likelihood, when doing Chemistry, you'll be opting for option A.


What you're asking for is what virtually everyone wants though isn't it? Money! And to get 50k+ is exactly what everyone getting a degree wants. Why is it that so many degrees don't lead to more money in life? The answer is because there isn't some magic pot of instant cash just because you get a degree. There is a finite amount of "good" (bloody successful) jobs which tbh are taken by the best / most successful and experienced (and perhaps those with the connections).

There are jobs in chemistry that could lead you earning £1M while equally there are jobs that are £30k ... that's life.

At least, chances are, you'll get something that puts out out of the 'average' and [hopefully] with something you'll like.

The alternative is run your own buisness, do a degree in something that might land you with more money (NOT ALL ECONOMICS / FINANCE DEGREE GRADS ARE RICH I MIGHT ADD!!) or work in some dead end desk job in macciez or something.
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by iElvendork)
If you're going into chemistry for the money then you may be disappointed depending on where you go for jobs
And if you want to go into patent law, then a science degree is very preferable
Quite a lot of my friends graduated this summer and they've gone into different roles, they didn't start their degree in chemistry with the intention of going into finance etc. but whilst doing their degree they found what their best skills were and decided where they wanted their career to go
Im not going into anything for the money but rather opportunities but I just want a decent amount, were not talking millions or even hundreds of thousnads or any excessive amount.
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by DrSebWilkes)
People will spend that money and you get some arbitrary student debt out of it (which isn't the same as, say, a credit card) but doing something they love hoping to either A) Continue in the field B) Use the experience of that field in getting a job.

So in all likelihood, when doing Chemistry, you'll be opting for option A.


What you're asking for is what virtually everyone wants though isn't it? Money! And to get 50k+ is exactly what everyone getting a degree wants. Why is it that so many degrees don't lead to more money in life? The answer is because there isn't some magic pot of instant cash just because you get a degree. There is a finite amount of "good" (bloody successful) jobs which tbh are taken by the best / most successful and experienced (and perhaps those with the connections).

There are jobs in chemistry that could lead you earning £1M while equally there are jobs that are £30k ... that's life.

At least, chances are, you'll get something that puts out out of the 'average' and [hopefully] with something you'll like.

The alternative is run your own buisness, do a degree in something that might land you with more money (NOT ALL ECONOMICS / FINANCE DEGREE GRADS ARE RICH I MIGHT ADD!!) or work in some dead end desk job in macciez or something.
I'm not asking about that!!I'm asking what type of jobs for chemistry are there that are decently paid?Im asking about what opportunities there are!
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S2M
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Plantagenet Crown will go crazy just by reading the title.
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iElvendork
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
Im not going into anything for the money but rather opportunities but I just want a decent amount, were not talking millions or even hundreds of thousnads or any excessive amount.
There's plenty of opportunities in chemistry especially for graduate schemes into R&D, there's also plenty of places to do a year in industry
You have to be passionate to study chemistry, I'm not bothered how much i end up earning, I'm working towards my PhD so I can do specialist research at universities
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Cicilaw
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(Original post by DrSebWilkes)
Some people do politics at university and end up being a manager or something. They enjoyed the degree and the degree is something that opens doors that a "normal" person doesn't have.

For Chemistry, there are chemistry jobs out there (chemical industry; R&D project manager etc.) that pay well above national median salaries which should lead to a good lifestyle.

What you're saying is "eughh this degree doesn't make me a millionaire therefore it's not worth it"
ummm when did he say that
"eughh this degree doesn't make me a millionaire therefore it's not worth it"
That quote appeared out of thin air
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DrSebWilkes
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(Original post by Cicilaw)
ummm when did he say that
"eughh this degree doesn't make me a millionaire therefore it's not worth it"
That quote appeared out of thin air
hyperbole
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by Black Water)
Plantagenet Crown will go crazy just by reading the title.
why?
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S2M
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
why?
He loves Chemistry.
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by Black Water)
He loves Chemistry.
This will be interesting. Hopefully, they can help me and tell me what jobs I could potentially look into.
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S2M
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
This will be interesting. Hopefully, they can help me and tell me what jobs I could potentially look into.
Yeah, probably the best person to answer your question.
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Vikingninja
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
While I seen some people say it is well respected what are the employment prospects?I seen people say patent attorney and finance and stuff like that, but what jobs are there that you MUST have a chemistry degree in order to do it and is well paid?I don't see a point of doing chemistry and then going in to finance or a job not related to it.Im considering chemistry as a job but I want to know more about prospects.

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...gree/chemistry

https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/c...y-careers.html

There you go.
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Anonymous1502
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This is a bit worrying 7.1% unemployment and 10.4% doing bar work,catering and retail suggesting it's hard to find a job after :/.Am I right to make this assumption?
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Vikingninja
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
This is a bit worrying 7.1% unemployment and 10.4% doing bar work,catering and retail suggesting it's hard to find a job after :/.Am I right to make this assumption?
What career you work in depends on what you make of it, I worked in a charity shop and one of the people there had a son who did geography and after a few years is a lorry driver, my dad on the other hand is a environmental consultant and was earning a pretty decent amount for a while and he went to an old poli. If you put the effort into gaining experience from a placement, making links in industry and dedicating yourself you can get a good job. That 17.5%, didn't do that.
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Skyewoods
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There are many jobs for chemistry graduates but not many graduate jobs in chemistry
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by Vikingninja)
What career you work in depends on what you make of it, I worked in a charity shop and one of the people there had a son who did geography and after a few years is a lorry driver, my dad on the other hand is a environmental consultant and was earning a pretty decent amount for a while and he went to an old poli. If you put the effort into gaining experience from a placement, making links in industry and dedicating yourself you can get a good job. That 17.5%, didn't do that.
That's great advice.Thank you
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