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korosensei
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#1
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(OPINION)
I'm currently in secondary school, but I have made a judgement that the education system is bad. It could just be that I went to bad schools, but I shall share my experiences. Let me start with primary school:
Of course, I don't remember much of primary school. But, I should first generalise how lessons are taught; One teacher, and about 30 students. This isn't University where the students know how to make notes off a lecture. Perhaps that method should be taught, but we would sit on a floor and have to listen to the teacher for the whole lesson. Honestly, that did feel boring and I had a low attention span to begin with. Why the low attention span? Because I was a kid and I wasn't given a reason to be doing all this. I had no ambition. Or at least, when I did have one (to be a game developer, which sounds rather decent now that I think of it), I was ridiculed by my friends (I wish I was told by my future self that none of my friends would be going to the same secondary school as me, haha.), and so I lied to myself that I would become a footballer; extremely unrealistic for me as I hate football. Discipline was also a high priority at primary school, so I would focus on not talking at all, which really took down my self-esteem. But was that even a good form of discipline? Just because I stared at one place for half an hour silently doesn't mean that I understood it! And I would be scared to ask for help, because the teacher would tell me off for not listening and even sometimes make me come back during lunchtime. I won't lie that one-to-one tutoring is extremely beneficial but the day lessons are just extremely inefficient. We would be wasting time writing the questions in our book, just to lower the printing costs? lmao. At Year 6, everything was horrible. The school wanted to get the top SATs results because of statistics; SATs didn't mean anything in secondary school but stupid me thought they were the equivalent of the 11 plus - which I didn't sit as the school gave no guidance, or even information, on that exam. Just the SATs, which we spent the whole of Year 6 on. Now that I think of it, the teaching, or revision, was extremely inefficient. Yes we would do a bunch of past papers, however we weren't taught to identify our mistakes and learn from them. That's all we had to do from the start in order to progress, but no, shutting up and listening mattered the most for the past 7 years.

Secondary School. Hell for me, as I had to go to some random one which no one in my class went to, and the 5 people from my school who did go there had never spoken to me while I was at primary. The only thing my primary school had prepared us for was the work, which they had made it out to be a massive jump or something. It wasn't. But I had started school alone. I didn't know how to make friends, so I had experimented socialising (not trying to hint that I'm autistic or anything, but my primary school was that strict, so the environment was really uncomfortable for me) and somehow ended up getting bullied. Not just by people in my class, but by people in the upper years for no reason. It took me 3 and a half years to actually get things straight and take my own initiative, get some good friends (not many, but at least they're not the volatile type), and stable grades (I am in the top set but had terrible attendance for the past few years, mainly due to the bullying). Now, this was a comprehensive school. But it was much different, as there were more distractions and it seemed that the people here didn't get any sort of 'discipline' from primary! But yeah, a lot of people simply didn't care about their grades or anything, which is my main point as to why a lot of people fail their GCSEs. Is it because the teaching is bad? Partly, in this case. Teachers, as always, focus on the students who are bad, and doing poorly. There are a lot of them in my school, but these idiots decide to ignore the teacher and give no effort in lessons. Thus the teacher gives them more attention, and the students who want to actually succeed are given less priority. Thus, the bad students fail and even some of the good students also fail, as they are given less support and as another point, my school doesn't actually teach us how to revise. Of course there are different ways, but we are only given a revision guide per subject; I am guilty of simply skimming through CGP guides and I have faced the consequences of this. But yes, there is also the fact that students need to put more effort in outside of school, and revise (effectively).
This is more of a personal pet peeve, I'm going into Year 11, and I'm probably going to get more careers' advice, but so far, I have had BTECs and Apprenticeships thrown into my face even though I have zero interest for them. No offence to the people who are, but I think that schools are promoting these options more because there is that lowered standard, as most people do achieve 5 C grades. I personally think that needs to improve, especially with the new Grade 9.
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Beth_H
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Unfortunately, the quality of education you get (both under our system and in other countries) is something of a postcode lottery - schools in wealthier areas, as a general rule, tend to perform better, due to having better resources, being able to afford highly qualified teaching staff, etc. The same goes for hospitals, care homes, and even (according to recent news) churches. I certainly don't think that our education system is inherently bad, but there are definitely systemic issues which need to be addressed with more urgency than they have been.
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korosensei
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(Original post by Beth_H)
Unfortunately, the quality of education you get (both under our system and in other countries) is something of a postcode lottery - schools in wealthier areas, as a general rule, tend to perform better, due to having better resources, being able to afford highly qualified teaching staff, etc. The same goes for hospitals, care homes, and even (according to recent news) churches. I certainly don't think that our education system is inherently bad, but there are definitely systemic issues which need to be addressed with more urgency than they have been.
To be fair, I do agree with you however the comprehensive school I go to is rather large, they spend a lot of money on the facilities but not a lot seems to go towards the education itself . However that school is located in a low-income area and there are a lot of European transfers who don't speak english, and my primary school is also in a low-income area so it does sort of correlate.
Also, I don't know why there has been a ban on new grammar schools. First of all, I partially agree that 11 is too young to decide; at 11 I simply wasn't informed enough. As I had said, primary education is extremely inefficient for what it is and if it were to be done correct, then 11 could actually stay the suitable age...
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ByEeek
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(Original post by Beth_H)
Unfortunately, the quality of education you get (both under our system and in other countries) is something of a postcode lottery - schools in wealthier areas, as a general rule, tend to perform better, due to having better resources, being able to afford highly qualified teaching staff, etc.
That's actually not true. Schools fail and flourish across the board, and in terms of resources, it is actually poorer areas that see schools getting better funding because of the Pupil Premium rate.

I think the thing to be wary of is judging the education system on the basis that we are all experts because we all went to school. Yes, there are good schools and bad schools, but all the evidence suggests that educational attainment is on the rise. When you add to the mix the fact that schools have a statutory duty to safeguard children's welfare in school and provide a balanced and varied curriculum I would say that the school experience now is 100% better than during my time in the 90s. Back then, being told to copy from the textbook was standard practice and there was no prep for exams. You learned the syllabus and off you trotted to the exam. And as for safeguarding - being left in a classroom full of bullies whilst the teacher took 10 minutes to walk from the staff room was common practice.

Our education system is far from perfect, but it is pretty good.
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MaleMan
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#5
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(Original post by korosensei)
(OPINION)
I'm currently in secondary school, but I have made a judgement that the education system is bad. It could just be that I went to bad schools, but I shall share my experiences. Let me start with primary school:
Of course, I don't remember much of primary school. But, I should first generalise how lessons are taught; One teacher, and about 30 students. This isn't University where the students know how to make notes off a lecture. Perhaps that method should be taught, but we would sit on a floor and have to listen to the teacher for the whole lesson. Honestly, that did feel boring and I had a low attention span to begin with. Why the low attention span? Because I was a kid and I wasn't given a reason to be doing all this. I had no ambition. Or at least, when I did have one (to be a game developer, which sounds rather decent now that I think of it), I was ridiculed by my friends (I wish I was told by my future self that none of my friends would be going to the same secondary school as me, haha.), and so I lied to myself that I would become a footballer; extremely unrealistic for me as I hate football. Discipline was also a high priority at primary school, so I would focus on not talking at all, which really took down my self-esteem. But was that even a good form of discipline? Just because I stared at one place for half an hour silently doesn't mean that I understood it! And I would be scared to ask for help, because the teacher would tell me off for not listening and even sometimes make me come back during lunchtime. I won't lie that one-to-one tutoring is extremely beneficial but the day lessons are just extremely inefficient. We would be wasting time writing the questions in our book, just to lower the printing costs? lmao. At Year 6, everything was horrible. The school wanted to get the top SATs results because of statistics; SATs didn't mean anything in secondary school but stupid me thought they were the equivalent of the 11 plus - which I didn't sit as the school gave no guidance, or even information, on that exam. Just the SATs, which we spent the whole of Year 6 on. Now that I think of it, the teaching, or revision, was extremely inefficient. Yes we would do a bunch of past papers, however we weren't taught to identify our mistakes and learn from them. That's all we had to do from the start in order to progress, but no, shutting up and listening mattered the most for the past 7 years.

Secondary School. Hell for me, as I had to go to some random one which no one in my class went to, and the 5 people from my school who did go there had never spoken to me while I was at primary. The only thing my primary school had prepared us for was the work, which they had made it out to be a massive jump or something. It wasn't. But I had started school alone. I didn't know how to make friends, so I had experimented socialising (not trying to hint that I'm autistic or anything, but my primary school was that strict, so the environment was really uncomfortable for me) and somehow ended up getting bullied. Not just by people in my class, but by people in the upper years for no reason. It took me 3 and a half years to actually get things straight and take my own initiative, get some good friends (not many, but at least they're not the volatile type), and stable grades (I am in the top set but had terrible attendance for the past few years, mainly due to the bullying). Now, this was a comprehensive school. But it was much different, as there were more distractions and it seemed that the people here didn't get any sort of 'discipline' from primary! But yeah, a lot of people simply didn't care about their grades or anything, which is my main point as to why a lot of people fail their GCSEs. Is it because the teaching is bad? Partly, in this case. Teachers, as always, focus on the students who are bad, and doing poorly. There are a lot of them in my school, but these idiots decide to ignore the teacher and give no effort in lessons. Thus the teacher gives them more attention, and the students who want to actually succeed are given less priority. Thus, the bad students fail and even some of the good students also fail, as they are given less support and as another point, my school doesn't actually teach us how to revise. Of course there are different ways, but we are only given a revision guide per subject; I am guilty of simply skimming through CGP guides and I have faced the consequences of this. But yes, there is also the fact that students need to put more effort in outside of school, and revise (effectively).
This is more of a personal pet peeve, I'm going into Year 11, and I'm probably going to get more careers' advice, but so far, I have had BTECs and Apprenticeships thrown into my face even though I have zero interest for them. No offence to the people who are, but I think that schools are promoting these options more because there is that lowered standard, as most people do achieve 5 C grades. I personally think that needs to improve, especially with the new Grade 9.
Absolutely sums up my experience.
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