Notchu
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Does anyone know the name of the major after which you make new medicines? I'm looking at majors now so that I'll be able to pick my A level subjects.
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StationToStation
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Do you mean, after what undergraduate degree you can go into medical research? You could look at courses like pharmacology or biomedical sciences etc. After an undergrad degree you'd also most likely have to do an MSc and/or a PhD.
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Notchu
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(Original post by StationToStation)
Do you mean, after what undergraduate degree you can go into medical research? You could look at courses like pharmacology or biomedical sciences etc. After an undergrad degree you'd also most likely have to do an MSc and/or a PhD.
Yes, undergraduate degree! I have checked both degrees. However, what I understood is that a pharmacology degree gets you a job where you help other scientist make medicines? So basically, you do the research and give it to them. As for Biomedical science, you study the effects of a certain drug on the body. I may have understood this wrong though, so is what I'm saying right...?
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QuentinM
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(Original post by Notchu)
Does anyone know the name of the major after which you make new medicines? I'm looking at majors now so that I'll be able to pick my A level subjects.
As above. Pharmacology is the main degree that researches the study of new drugs. Medicinal chemistry is also pretty relevant as this route might actually involve the design of the molecules used for drugs. You will do quite a bit of Med Chem during a Pharmacology degree as well tbh.

Based on this, Chemistry is a must, and Biology will be a desireable. Maths might be useful, but i can't recommend any others.

Also worth noting, From the lectures i've had from people during my pharma modules, drug discovery is a ridiculously difficult process. It sounds like its a lot of High throughput screening assays on thousands of molecules at a time, only to find just 1 of them, or none, have any effect. I've been to a lecture by a guy nearing the end of his career and he's only "discovered" one drug and he's just seeing it into clinical trials. I've had a lecture from a professor who worked in pharma for 10 years trying to find the next big painkiller, but 10 years of research and they found the drug to be too dangerous. Someone has to do it, but I just want to give you a more realistic view-based on what you wrote it sounds like you might think you are gonna go in, discover a tonne of drugs-in reality youre lucky if you choose the right topic to study and find 1 drug
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Notchu
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(Original post by QuentinM)
As above. Pharmacology is the main degree that researches the study of new drugs. Medicinal chemistry is also pretty relevant as this route might actually involve the design of the molecules used for drugs. You will do quite a bit of Med Chem during a Pharmacology degree as well tbh.

Based on this, Chemistry is a must, and Biology will be a desireable. Maths might be useful, but i can't recommend any others.

Also worth noting, From the lectures i've had from people during my pharma modules, drug discovery is a ridiculously difficult process. It sounds like its a lot of High throughput screening assays on thousands of molecules at a time, only to find just 1 of them, or none, have any effect. I've been to a lecture by a guy nearing the end of his career and he's only "discovered" one drug and he's just seeing it into clinical trials. I've had a lecture from a professor who worked in pharma for 10 years trying to find the next big painkiller, but 10 years of research and they found the drug to be too dangerous. Someone has to do it, but I just want to give you a more realistic view-based on what you wrote it sounds like you might think you are gonna go in, discover a tonne of drugs-in reality youre lucky if you choose the right topic to study and find 1 drug
I see, I'm still interested in the job. However, would I be able to get a job easily? Like for some jobs there is a high demand while there are others with less demand even though they are important jobs. Moreover, is it like you first pick pharmacology and then you get specialized in a certain category? Also, how does it work later on? Do you work for a company who pays for your research and then take the credit for your finding? Thank you so much!
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QuentinM
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(Original post by Notchu)
I see, I'm still interested in the job. However, would I be able to get a job easily? Like for some jobs there is a high demand while there are others with less demand even though they are important jobs. Moreover, is it like you first pick pharmacology and then you get specialized in a certain category? Also, how does it work later on? Do you work for a company who pays for your research and then take the credit for your finding? Thank you so much!
For most science jobs nowadays supply of people is above demand, so no, getting a job won't be "easy". You'll normally be expected to have a masters degree or PhD after too, which makes it even more difficult.

You would pick pharmacology as a degree, and then you get the opportunity to chose modules and your final year project to specialise in a specific area. For example if you are more interested in cancer, the heart, neuroscience, immunity....you can specialise down those paths.

A while ago it would have been more working for companies, but now you could be developing compounds at a university as part of their research too. If you did work for either, you would likely be working in quite a large group of people, all of whom would be credited with the discovery of the drug once the stuff gets published. The company would pay for your research, but at universities it would be through funding, mainly from charities or government. The only credit they take is in any published research, you have to state where you conducted the research (e.g. at which university/company).
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Notchu
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(Original post by QuentinM)
For most science jobs nowadays supply of people is above demand, so no, getting a job won't be "easy". You'll normally be expected to have a masters degree or PhD after too, which makes it even more difficult.

You would pick pharmacology as a degree, and then you get the opportunity to chose modules and your final year project to specialise in a specific area. For example if you are more interested in cancer, the heart, neuroscience, immunity....you can specialise down those paths.

A while ago it would have been more working for companies, but now you could be developing compounds at a university as part of their research too. If you did work for either, you would likely be working in quite a large group of people, all of whom would be credited with the discovery of the drug once the stuff gets published. The company would pay for your research, but at universities it would be through funding, mainly from charities or government. The only credit they take is in any published research, you have to state where you conducted the research (e.g. at which university/company).
Thank you so much for your help!!!!
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