Police direct entry to detective

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John2008
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Can anyone who has done or is in the process of doing the direct entry to police at detective constable share their experiences
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username2831818
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I would also like to know this.

http://metro.co.uk/2017/06/01/how-to...ctive-6678785/ claims that it is possible to become a detective without having to work as a police officer, but the catch is that if you want to avoid being a police constable first, you "will need to have a university degree, and those being recruited will need to pass the National Investigators Exam within 12 months of joining. Applicants will also need to complete a development programme, which takes two years."

However, most sources I have found said that one has to work for a minimum of two years in a uniformed position within the police force before taking the role of a detective.
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oneocean
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I'd personally advise joining up as a regular constable and completing the initial 2 years. You will gain far more experience that way about policing in general.

You will also have many more options open to you; you can continue on the detective route if you wish. Or, you can go in one of many other directions.

In the initial 2 years, you will have many opportunities to progress investigations
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John2008
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(Original post by oneocean)
I'd personally advise joining up as a regular constable and completing the initial 2 years. You will gain far more experience that way about policing in general.

You will also have many more options open to you; you can continue on the detective route if you wish. Or, you can go in one of many other directions.

In the initial 2 years, you will have many opportunities to progress investigations
Without trying to sound really pretentious and up myself, I am a graduate from a top university and would like to join the police, I'm highly ambitious and wonder what is the quickest path to climb the ranks
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oneocean
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(Original post by John2008)
Without trying to sound really pretentious and up myself, I am a graduate from a top university and would like to join the police, I'm highly ambitious and wonder what is the quickest path to climb the ranks
Quite clearly the quickest way would be the graduate entry route to Inspector

However, you will miss out on what policing is - dealing with the general public face to face at the thick end for at least 2 years.
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roronoa1zoro
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(Original post by John2008)
Without trying to sound really pretentious and up myself, I am a graduate from a top university and would like to join the police, I'm highly ambitious and wonder what is the quickest path to climb the ranks
Inspector morse 🤔
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Notoriety
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(Original post by J-SP)
Sounds like 1,000s of other people struggling to get into the Police at any level, let alone some form of super fast track route.
Struggling? Come on. It's relatively easy to get into the police.

Maybe in the MPS it's just a bit harder, but that's the premier force and the vast majority of forces aren't recruiting from an 8.5 million population.

(Original post by John2008)
Without trying to sound really pretentious and up myself, I am a graduate from a top university and would like to join the police, I'm highly ambitious and wonder what is the quickest path to climb the ranks
You seem to think you're the first person to have joined the police after graduating from a top uni. You could try the fast-track route, but they prefer people with professional experience. Go in as a constable and stop thinking you're so fabulous. You'll be earning decent money, get an in-depth knowledge of police procedures, and your career will be all the better for it.
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(Original post by J-SP)
Many police forces aren't recruiting. Many have had recruitment freezes on. It isn't as people think it is, although if there are roles and you meet all the criteria, then all of a sudden it becomes easier.

Many "top" uni grads end up in volunteer roles and in PSCO jobs trying to get in via the back door.
Well, I can only really speak from experience with a smaller regional force, and the people who they're taking in are really uninspiring. The specials and PCSO route are reserved for the completely incompetent -- the ones with 4 GCSEs at D and three teeth. Perhaps this is more to do with my home town than it is to do with policing generally. But ultimately, there are some forces in which it is surprisingly easy to be recruited.
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(Original post by J-SP)
Sounds like it's more to do with your home town. Very different elsewhere from my experiences.
South East experiences, but most forces aren't in the South East.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by J-SP)
Wrong assumption there.
North West? GMP is quite big too.
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999tigger
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(Original post by John2008)
Without trying to sound really pretentious and up myself, I am a graduate from a top university and would like to join the police, I'm highly ambitious and wonder what is the quickest path to climb the ranks
You managed it.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by J-SP)
Only know GMP through several friends who work for the police force there - although many have left due to lack of promotion opportunities.
In full candour, I have heard similar things about the smaller forces. Inspector and no higher after 20 years service. There's quite a high burnout rate, though, so this should be the least of OP's worries at the moment.
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<Username>
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(Original post by John2008)
Without trying to sound really pretentious and up myself, I am a graduate from a top university and would like to join the police, I'm highly ambitious and wonder what is the quickest path to climb the ranks
This is the problem with direct entry. It attracts the wrong people.

Policing isn’t about rising to the top quickly. It’s not a business with bonuses and top level pay. It’s about helping people and doing your duty and service for the community and your country.

I’m a serving police officer and I came across this thread on google. It’s disturbing reading comments like this.

Having done over a decade of policing I’m not against direct entry unlike some of my colleagues. However I think it needs to be done for the right reason.

It’s not about simply progressing to the top for yourself, it’s about bribing in skills the service may sometimes need such as management skills or other non-policing skills.

A lot of top officers are quality officers because they worked hard to get where they are. They know the job inside out, they know the community and they can empathise with them because they’ve gone through a lot of the issues with them. To see someone jump in just to get to the top doesn’t sit well with me and many others. However if someone came with experience that would benefit our service, such as skills from another sector of employment that they could add to policing then that’s great.

Direct entry is about adding skills to complement policing. It’s not about simply going for the top.

Having rank is one thing, knowing what you’re doing, being respected and being able to do the job is another.

This is not a career for those that simply seek self promotion. It’s hard work, punishing and often thankless. Policing can wreck your personal life and if you get it wrong in this job it’s often more of a burden than any other job.

Calling it a job is probably unfair too. It’s a way of life rather than just a job or career.
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<Username>
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(Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
Struggling? Come on. It's relatively easy to get into the police.

Maybe in the MPS it's just a bit harder, but that's the premier force and the vast majority of forces aren't recruiting from an 8.5 million population
I would disagree on two points there.

1) No, it’s not relatively easy. Plenty fail on each intake and thousands can apply for a handful of spots. It’s certainly easier to join these days than it used to be but plenty still get turned away.

2) the Met is certainly not the premier force. It’s just a big force. There’s nothing premier about it at all. Plenty of other forces that I’d consider a better option to the Met in terms of places to work and performance.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by <Username>)
I would disagree on two points there.

1) No, it’s not relatively easy. Plenty fail on each intake and thousands can apply for a handful of spots. It’s certainly easier to join these days than it used to be but plenty still get turned away.
If you look at FOI requests, you will see that thousands of applications itself is not typical. Nor is it that they're applying for a "handful" of places.

Even for the Met, the success rate ranges from 30% to 50%. Regional forces it is typically in the 30% range. Compare this with comparatively paid entry public sector roles which can have a success rate next to 1%: see Civil Service Fast Stream stats. Hence, relative to numerous other roles it is not nearly as competitive.

2) the Met is certainly not the premier force. It’s just a big force. There’s nothing premier about it at all. Plenty of other forces that I’d consider a better option to the Met in terms of places to work and performance.
When I said premier, I did not mean they had the best HR department and put on the best fancy dress parties in the village pub every couple months. It is clearly the premier force in the range of activities covered, complexity of jobs and the volume of jobs you will be assigned to deal with -- a lot less "administrative assistant-y" at MPS, more "police officer".
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username2228681
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(Original post by John2008)
Can anyone who has done or is in the process of doing the direct entry to police at detective constable share their experiences
Hi

I have a conditional offer for the direct entry dc route.
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username2228681
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(Original post by <Username>)
This is the problem with direct entry. It attracts the wrong people.

Policing isn’t about rising to the top quickly. It’s not a business with bonuses and top level pay. It’s about helping people and doing your duty and service for the community and your country.

I’m a serving police officer and I came across this thread on google. It’s disturbing reading comments like this.

Having done over a decade of policing I’m not against direct entry unlike some of my colleagues. However I think it needs to be done for the right reason.

It’s not about simply progressing to the top for yourself, it’s about bribing in skills the service may sometimes need such as management skills or other non-policing skills.

A lot of top officers are quality officers because they worked hard to get where they are. They know the job inside out, they know the community and they can empathise with them because they’ve gone through a lot of the issues with them. To see someone jump in just to get to the top doesn’t sit well with me and many others. However if someone came with experience that would benefit our service, such as skills from another sector of employment that they could add to policing then that’s great.

Direct entry is about adding skills to complement policing. It’s not about simply going for the top.

Having rank is one thing, knowing what you’re doing, being respected and being able to do the job is another.

This is not a career for those that simply seek self promotion. It’s hard work, punishing and often thankless. Policing can wreck your personal life and if you get it wrong in this job it’s often more of a burden than any other job.

Calling it a job is probably unfair too. It’s a way of life rather than just a job or career.

Completely agree
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<Username>
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(Original post by Notorious_B.I.G.)
Well, I can only really speak from experience with a smaller regional force, and the people who they're taking in are really uninspiring. The specials and PCSO route are reserved for the completely incompetent -- the ones with 4 GCSEs at D and three teeth. Perhaps this is more to do with my home town than it is to do with policing generally. But ultimately, there are some forces in which it is surprisingly easy to be recruited.
While the quality of specials has certainly dropped over recent years to allow for numbers to be maintained while regular officer numbers are cut, I think your view of specials and PCSOs is very unfair. I have never been a special or a PCSO, however I have worked with many over the years.

What I will say is that in my experience, those who come to policing from a PCSO or special constable background are often miles apart from those coming in as graduates. Their experiences, skills and ability to relate to people is far superior.

I joined well over a decade ago. On my intake were several graduates. They were very good at the exams and about the same at the physical requirements. Where they often fell down, and in a big way, was with dealing with the public. They often didn't seem to know how to speak to people and on some occasions I could see that they appeared to think they were above the person they were dealing with - often condescending and unable to put themselves on the same level as the person they were trying to help. This is not reflective of all graduates, but a large number of them.

The better cops, with the exception of one or two I've met in the last 15 years, have all come from backgrounds that haven't involved a university education - or one that involved a considerable amount of time before or after the education.

I don't have an issue with graduates, but I don't think a degree or any qualification makes you a good cop.

I left school with GSCEs and did some time at college. I have a full set of teeth and my grades were average, but it's not held me back. I have a number of commendations and more awards than the average officer. I've also got a reputation for getting the job done and being a decent thief taker. I admit I'm not a fan of the 'customer service' and 'police service' ideas these days and prefer being a police force who looks after the public and hunts down criminals - so I'm a bit more old school than the more modern cop, but I'm a damn good cop. I am also not unique. I know many, many decent cops who have little in terms of educational qualifications who I suspect you'd probably never get close to in terms of a policing achievement. Exceptional cops don't need degrees. This job is not about qualifications or getting to the top. You can't teach proper policing. It comes from common sense, life skills, experience, being able to adapt to the criminal or the victim's life and so much more.

Specials and PCSOs may get looked down on, but they tend to make a much better cop than graduates so they get my respect.
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IsaacAllen
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(Original post by <Username>)
While the quality of specials has certainly dropped over recent years to allow for numbers to be maintained while regular officer numbers are cut, I think your view of specials and PCSOs is very unfair. I have never been a special or a PCSO, however I have worked with many over the years.

What I will say is that in my experience, those who come to policing from a PCSO or special constable background are often miles apart from those coming in as graduates. Their experiences, skills and ability to relate to people is far superior.

I joined well over a decade ago. On my intake were several graduates. They were very good at the exams and about the same at the physical requirements. Where they often fell down, and in a big way, was with dealing with the public. They often didn't seem to know how to speak to people and on some occasions I could see that they appeared to think they were above the person they were dealing with - often condescending and unable to put themselves on the same level as the person they were trying to help. This is not reflective of all graduates, but a large number of them.

The better cops, with the exception of one or two I've met in the last 15 years, have all come from backgrounds that haven't involved a university education - or one that involved a considerable amount of time before or after the education.

I don't have an issue with graduates, but I don't think a degree or any qualification makes you a good cop.

I left school with GSCEs and did some time at college. I have a full set of teeth and my grades were average, but it's not held me back. I have a number of commendations and more awards than the average officer. I've also got a reputation for getting the job done and being a decent thief taker. I admit I'm not a fan of the 'customer service' and 'police service' ideas these days and prefer being a police force who looks after the public and hunts down criminals - so I'm a bit more old school than the more modern cop, but I'm a damn good cop. I am also not unique. I know many, many decent cops who have little in terms of educational qualifications who I suspect you'd probably never get close to in terms of a policing achievement. Exceptional cops don't need degrees. This job is not about qualifications or getting to the top. You can't teach proper policing. It comes from common sense, life skills, experience, being able to adapt to the criminal or the victim's life and so much more.

Specials and PCSOs may get looked down on, but they tend to make a much better cop than graduates so they get my respect.
Good evening <username>

I am currently 18 months from graduating with a Maths degree. I really would like to avoid the pitfalls you mention that come with graduate entry - and am considering applying to become a special constable over the summer, if university dates allow. Is there anything else you can think of that a graduate could do to improve themselves as police officers, and their chances of entry to the force? I want to help people and my community, and I am trying to think of ways that will help me to do that.

Best

Isaac
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jenv
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(Original post by tabasco1)
Hi

I have a conditional offer for the direct entry dc route.
Congrats ! Did you accept the offer? Are you currently training? I'm going through the recruitment process now...
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