What is the difference between a bachelors degree in biology and other life sciences? Watch

Janvi Pabari
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Hii!
I was in the process of applying to community college in USA and while I was choosing my majors, I came across a whole bunch of them that all involve biology; a bachelor's degree in biology, in biochemistry, in biomathematics, in cell biology and neuroscience, in the biological sciences and biotechnology.
What is the difference between them all and does a bachelors degree in biology and/or biological sciences encompass them all?

Thank you for any help!
Appreciate it!
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QuentinM
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(Original post by Janvi Pabari)
Hii!
I was in the process of applying to community college in USA and while I was choosing my majors, I came across a whole bunch of them that all involve biology; a bachelor's degree in biology, in biochemistry, in biomathematics, in cell biology and neuroscience, in the biological sciences and biotechnology.
What is the difference between them all and does a bachelors degree in biology and/or biological sciences encompass them all?

Thank you for any help!
Appreciate it!

Biology is general biology-can pretty much encompass anything you want it to within biology.

Biochemistry focuses mainly on chemical reactions within biology. So it focuses on respiration, photosynthesis, enzymes, metabolism, etc etc. It can also focus quite heavily on proteins-so things like protein folding and structure.

Biomathematics is a lot more maths than biology really. It takes topics in biology and involves developing mathematical models for them. You'll need strong background in maths for this.

Cell Biology involved looking at the biology of cells. You probably got that from the name didn't you. It will involve lots of genetics and molecular biology and all that lovely stuff

Neuroscience is the study of the brain. It can link in with the above-for example, looking at the biology of cells of the brain during disease, or proteins in the brain during disease (hot topics).

Biological sciences Is quite a similar degree to biology really-its pretty much the same degree just with a different name.

Biotechnology is studying how we use biology to improve the real world. This involves things like studying micro-organisms to identify how to improve food production, drug production, fuel production, etc etc.
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Janvi Pabari
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Biology is general biology-can pretty much encompass anything you want it to within biology.

Biochemistry focuses mainly on chemical reactions within biology. So it focuses on respiration, photosynthesis, enzymes, metabolism, etc etc. It can also focus quite heavily on proteins-so things like protein folding and structure.

Biomathematics is a lot more maths than biology really. It takes topics in biology and involves developing mathematical models for them. You'll need strong background in maths for this.

Cell Biology involved looking at the biology of cells. You probably got that from the name didn't you. It will involve lots of genetics and molecular biology and all that lovely stuff

Neuroscience is the study of the brain. It can link in with the above-for example, looking at the biology of cells of the brain during disease, or proteins in the brain during disease (hot topics).

Biological sciences Is quite a similar degree to biology really-its pretty much the same degree just with a different name.

Biotechnology is studying how we use biology to improve the real world. This involves things like studying micro-organisms to identify how to improve food production, drug production, fuel production, etc etc.
Thank you for the reply!
Although I still have a couple more questions if you don't mind answering them.

If I intend to go to med school after my bachelor's degree, which one would be the best to take?

Also, if I take a bachelor's degree in biology, would I be missing out important information from all the other biology-related degrees?

Thank you!
Janvi Pabari.
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QuentinM
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(Original post by Janvi Pabari)
Thank you for the reply!
Although I still have a couple more questions if you don't mind answering them.
Eh fine

(Original post by Janvi Pabari)
If I intend to go to med school after my bachelor's degree, which one would be the best to take?
Biology, cell biology, or biological science. Neuroscience and biochemistry could work well too at certain universities (most really).

(Original post by Janvi Pabari)
Also, if I take a bachelor's degree in biology, would I be missing out important information from all the other biology-related degrees?

Thank you!
Janvi Pabari.
Depends on the university, but likely not. Normally biology is considered a "general" degree, so you get access to all modules, or almost all modules that other courses get. In first year, you'll likely get an almost identical basic introduction package of modules. Then in following years, as i say, likely a wider range of choices.
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Janvi Pabari
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Eh fine



Biology, cell biology, or biological science. Neuroscience and biochemistry could work well too at certain universities (most really).



Depends on the university, but likely not. Normally biology is considered a "general" degree, so you get access to all modules, or almost all modules that other courses get. In first year, you'll likely get an almost identical basic introduction package of modules. Then in following years, as i say, likely a wider range of choices.
Thank you so much.
Really appreciate the help.
Are you doing a bachelors degree in science as well?
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QuentinM
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(Original post by Janvi Pabari)
Thank you so much.
Really appreciate the help.
Are you doing a bachelors degree in science as well?
No problem. I've just finished my masters degree in Bioscience (another degree term for Biology), and have a Bachelors in Medical Science. I've had to share modules with people on most/all of those courses you mentioned.

Based on what i've said, which of those would you say seems more interesting to you? What would you hope to do in the future after a biology-based degree?
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Janvi Pabari
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(Original post by QuentinM)
No problem. I've just finished my masters degree in Bioscience (another degree term for Biology), and have a Bachelors in Medical Science. I've had to share modules with people on most/all of those courses you mentioned.

Based on what i've said, which of those would you say seems more interesting to you? What would you hope to do in the future after a biology-based degree?
Oh wow! How did you find it in terms of the work load? And where did you get your degrees? I was thinking of applying to Rutgers university. Do you know of its reputation or have you heard of it?

I'm hoping to get into med school after my bachelor's degree. Not sure which one yet. What other options are there besides med school? Can I go into medical research before I get into med school?

Too many questions ahah, sorry, I'm just trying to figure out what I can/need to do.
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QuentinM
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(Original post by Janvi Pabari)
Oh wow! How did you find it in terms of the work load? And where did you get your degrees? I was thinking of applying to Rutgers university. Do you know of its reputation or have you heard of it?

I'm hoping to get into med school after my bachelor's degree. Not sure which one yet. What other options are there besides med school? Can I go into medical research before I get into med school?

Too many questions ahah, sorry, I'm just trying to figure out what I can/need to do.
Didn't even consider that you might have been American oops.

Im in the UK so i did by Bachelors in Exeter and Masters in Bath. Workload will be different between UK and US so i can't help there, or with anything about Rutgers (i just know its in the US).

Medical research or technician jobs (e.g. in hospitals) are good options that keep you in the lab when you graduate.
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Janvi Pabari
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Didn't even consider that you might have been American oops.

Im in the UK so i did by Bachelors in Exeter and Masters in Bath. Workload will be different between UK and US so i can't help there, or with anything about Rutgers (i just know its in the US).

Medical research or technician jobs (e.g. in hospitals) are good options that keep you in the lab when you graduate.
Hahaha no, I'm not American. I'm an Indian from Kenya but I want to go to America for medicine mainly because of the job market. Is it easy to find jobs in the UK in the medical field?

Oh okay. Don't really fancy that haha might as well just work a little more and become a doctor and then hopefully a cardiologist.

What are your plans after your masters?
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