How much should I revise over the course of year 11? Watch

thesmartguy
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I'm going into year 11 in a few days, and I want to start revising straight away. I don't know how many hours of note-taking and revision I should do every day. Can someone give me an outline of how many hours I should revise for each month leading up to my GCSE exams. I'm aiming for grade 8/9s, but I don't want to stress out too much.
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ecila21
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At the beginning of the year, if you really want to revise spend a bit of time everyday making your revision notes. From September I made sure that I had up to date notes for all of my science subjects and history, for example. I wouldn't spend too long doing this at the start of the year - maybe an hour max? As mocks start to approach, increase this time and start revising more rather than making notes. After mocks, I would have a short break of maybe a few weeks or a month then build up revision from February/March, hitting maybe 5 hours a day during the Easter Holidays and at weekends and 2, maybe 3 hours after school. If you feel like this is too much, tone it down a bit. Find out what works best for you and remember not to burn yourself out as that will do more harm than good in the long run.
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Catlover0161
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There is no need to start solidly revising just yet because you will burn out. Over the year after every topic you do, particularly with sciences, ensure you have written notes on the topic from class notes and the textbook. Store these in a folder or plastic wallet display folder - I loved them. Now you have all of you notes in one place and do not need to spend your time in Christmas/Easter writing notes like others will be!
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wastedcuriosity
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What I wish I'd done is revise what I'd learnt after every lesson. When you get home, rewrite your notes, reread the chapter and get it in your head. Don't stuff all the revision in before your mocks/GCSEs. Learn gradually. Obviously, go over it all before your exams, but make sure you have a grasp on what you've learnt. Also, if you don't understand something, ASK. Don't try and teach yourself. Best of luck!
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Retired_Messiah
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If you want to do it every day from the start (you really don't need to but I don't run your life), just look over what you've done in lessons and rewrite bits of notes here and there. Like half an hour a day, hour maximum? Doing it intensively is gonna just tire you out and at GCSE it is totally not necessary to be too intense. I got a lot of my grades from pure night before revision, and still got Bs so... :dontknow:
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DeepInTheMeadow
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(Original post by thesmartguy)
I'm going into year 11 in a few days, and I want to start revising straight away. I don't know how many hours of note-taking and revision I should do every day. Can someone give me an outline of how many hours I should revise for each month leading up to my GCSE exams. I'm aiming for grade 8/9s, but I don't want to stress out too much.
Hey there! I just finished Year 11 and got 8s/9s(or the equivalent) and I would say don't revise more than an hour a day after school, just do your homework, make your notes and make sure you understood the class work. From Dec/January, I revised 2/3 hours a day, particularly on weekends, but still only an hour after school. From March, you want to start increasing that so you can do 4/5/6 hours in the Easter holidays and still a couple after school. On study leave, I revised about 6 hours a day, but always took at least one day break in a week (for me this was Sunday, unless I had a Monday exam)

Remember a) Do not revise too much or you'll burn out!!! and b) These are just guidelines, it'll depend on the quality of your revision and the learner that you are, but I always found it helpful to have an approximate amount.
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Danny7867
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(Original post by DeepInTheMeadow)
Hey there! I just finished Year 11 and got 8s/9s(or the equivalent) and I would say don't revise more than an hour a day after school, just do your homework, make your notes and make sure you understood the class work. From Dec/January, I revised 2/3 hours a day, particularly on weekends, but still only an hour after school. From March, you want to start increasing that so you can do 4/5/6 hours in the Easter holidays and still a couple after school. On study leave, I revised about 6 hours a day, but always took at least one day break in a week (for me this was Sunday, unless I had a Monday exam)

Remember a) Do not revise too much or you'll burn out!!! and b) These are just guidelines, it'll depend on the quality of your revision and the learner that you are, but I always found it helpful to have an approximate amount.
what is burning out and the consequences of this?
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DeepInTheMeadow
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(Original post by Danny7867)
what is burning out and the consequences of this?
Burning out is when you do too much work, too soon, and it can lead to a ton of problems.
If I can give an example from my life: I revised like a crazy person over Christmas for my January mocks, so much so, that when it came to my exams, I felt like walking out of each and every one of them. I had revised too much and this left me feeling unmotivated, I got very sick, it affected my mental health, and my performance decreased. You really have to be careful and take regular breaks, because you might feel like you're doing alright, but your body will, at some point, have had enough. There is no point reaching your maximum in September, because you won't remember anything in May/June, and you won't have any motivation or strength left for the real exams.
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hoixw
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(Original post by chloerebecca1)
What I wish I'd done is revise what I'd learnt after every lesson. When you get home, rewrite your notes, reread the chapter and get it in your head. Don't stuff all the revision in before your mocks/GCSEs. Learn gradually. Obviously, go over it all before your exams, but make sure you have a grasp on what you've learnt. Also, if you don't understand something, ASK. Don't try and teach yourself. Best of luck!
THIS. I'm going into year 11 like you, and i made like no notes in all of year 10 and f*cked up big time in a few of the mocks. At least I learnt earlier than some, but seriously make notes on the day and they'll work. You don't want to be like me, sitting here at 22:43 making notes on my ENTIRE FLIPPING COMPUTING COURSE.
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eposs123
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Biggest thing i'd say is throughout September if there is a particular subject you know you're going to have to revise more or you feel less confident about try and dedicate time more time to that subject when you can without neglecting your other subjects. For me this was maths so every maths lesson i'd ask my teacher for some practice questions and i'd do them along with my homework for that day. It helped me to get the formulas and the method of working things out into my head and because i was doing them as if it was homework it made me complete them. From September to December i'd say focus on your homework and if you have coursework for example within textiles or English out the way and revise the things you know you're struggling with. Remember you only get to do Year 11 once so enjoy it because it goes so fast but keep in mind it's the year that'll mostly set up what you want to do next Good luck!
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donkey.kong
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I'd suggest for you to make sure you are actively learning in class (e.g. actually taking good notes from your teacher's words and textbook, and trying to minimise distractions in class such as talking to friends). Also, do all your homework to the best standard possible, even if it may take you hours to finish one piece. Revise thoroughly for your mocks as though they are your real gcses. The mocks really help you to understand which topics you are struggling with and which methods of revision work for you. Doing all of this allowed me to start proper revision just 1 month before my gcses, and I got 3 9s and 7A*s, so I guess it worked! The only thing I do regret though is starting revision so late. Even though I got really good grades, I was stressing all summer because I felt like my revision was insufficient. I think you should start doing light revision around March and then doing around 3 hours a day when the easter holidays start. Gcses shouldnt be too difficult if you've been working fairly consistently throughout the year. Good luck!
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The RAR
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So many people in here got better grades than me by doing less revision time than me, it really makes me wonder if my IQ has decreased by chance.
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BOTCWTGBC
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Look, to be honest year 11 is piss easy. Just don't revise and have fun.
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lalliboo
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Hey I've just finished GCSEs and got 9 in language and 8 in lit. Don't stress before the exam and start to learn the details beforehand.
If you did AQA like I did, you'll have loads of poems- just gently revise them all up until the exam. Then you'll have plenty of time to learn.
MY biggest regret is stressing months before and not doing enough revision in this time. This put a lot of stress on me Easter onward and during the exam period I was just working constantly for the exam the next day.

Don't burn yourself out with revision- just start to gently quiz yourself and make revision resources. The real revision begins a month before.
Remind yourself you are aiming for 9s, so make good notes in class and take in all the tips your teachers give you when they mark your papers.

You'll do fine.
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