joyoustele
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Please explain the difference. Between AC and DC Motors.
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AmeliaLost
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Google? AC is alternating and DC is direct current. What are you getting stuck on?
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joyoustele
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(Original post by AmeliaLost)
Google? AC is alternating and DC is direct current. What are you getting stuck on?
I know that, i wanted the explanation in more detail than what you gave(maybe a short summary).
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AmeliaLost
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(Original post by joyoustele)
I know that, i wanted the explanation in more detail than what you gave(maybe a short summary).
There are lots of summaries online. try clicking the link I gave. Have a read and let me know if anything is confusing.
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joyoustele
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(Original post by AmeliaLost)
Google? AC is alternating and DC is direct current. What are you getting stuck on?
Sorry, I didnt put motors in the title. What i needed help with was, the difference between AC and DC motors.
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joyoustele
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(Original post by AmeliaLost)
Google? AC is alternating and DC is direct current. What are you getting stuck on?
Hey how did you do that google animation thingy? its quite funny
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AmeliaLost
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(Original post by joyoustele)
Hey how did you do that google animation thingy? its quite funny
haha just go to www.letmegooglethat.com.

Motors are sort of a big topic. We spent about 6 months studying them on my electrical course, and that was only the tip of it really. Again you might just want to have a read through some stuff and ask questions on specific points; I don't know how much detail you need!

ed: here's a pretty simple breakdown I found
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joyoustele
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(Original post by AmeliaLost)
haha just go to www.letmegooglethat.com.

Motors are sort of a big topic. We spent about 6 months studying them on my electrical course, and that was only the tip of it really. Again you might just want to have a read through some stuff and ask questions on specific points; I don't know how much detail you need!

ed: here's a pretty simple breakdown I found
You're a legend. All i needed was the basics between the AC and DC motor, their structural differences and how to improve their performance. The website you gave me seems to cover everything. Thank you!
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AmeliaLost
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(Original post by joyoustele)
You're a legend. All i needed was the basics between the AC and DC motor, their structural differences and how to improve their performance. The website you gave me seems to cover everything. Thank you!
Yay glad to help
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silversocks012
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I looked at the thread title and was thinking music oops
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doggypoop69
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One has a 'A' in front and the other has a 'D' in front
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AmeliaLost
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(Original post by doggypoop69)
One has a 'A' in front and the other has a 'D' in front
Image
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doggypoop69
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(Original post by AmeliaLost)
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Thanks, took me a while to figure out. Tricky one but I think I got it
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MrMOI
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AC/DC is to do with the polarity of the "power source" you use so to speak.

Direct Current refers to electrons moving in one specific direction and this direction can be changed depending on the polarity (i.e. the direction in which your battery is connected to your conducting material). Have you ever put your batteries in on the wrong way in an electronic device? Yeah thats the flow of electrons being changed, and thus the device doesn't work mostly.

AC is alternating and you have a flow of electrons back and forth. If you have an alternating current you must also have alternating voltage, this is why you get dim and bright cycles. Think of it as a graph that starts from 0, then goes to a maximum voltage (maximum brightness), then dims down because you are now going the reverse way until you get maximum brightness in the negative region etc.


Imagine all the electrons flowing clockwise for a second, after a certain time they now move counterclockwise and then back to clockwise etc...

Look at the attachment, might make more sense.

In short AC/DC is not only for current but also for voltage.

If anyone has questions on physics, particularly quantum/nuclear physics let me know.
Attached files
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joyoustele
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(Original post by MrMOI)
AC/DC is to do with the polarity of the "power source" you use so to speak.

Direct Current refers to electrons moving in one specific direction and this direction can be changed depending on the polarity (i.e. the direction in which your battery is connected to your conducting material). Have you ever put your batteries in on the wrong way in an electronic device? Yeah thats the flow of electrons being changed, and thus the device doesn't work mostly.

AC is alternating and you have a flow of electrons back and forth. If you have an alternating current you must also have alternating voltage, this is why you get dim and bright cycles. Think of it as a graph that starts from 0, then goes to a maximum voltage (maximum brightness), then dims down because you are now going the reverse way until you get maximum brightness in the negative region etc.


Imagine all the electrons flowing clockwise for a second, after a certain time they now move counterclockwise and then back to clockwise etc...

Look at the attachment, might make more sense.

In short AC/DC is not only for current but also for voltage.

If anyone has questions on physics, particularly quantum/nuclear physics let me know.
Damn you're amazing.
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