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bigeyeshijabi
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi everyone! Im currently about to start Yr 13 and got 3 A's and a B in my AS results and want to study Law at either KCl, UCL, QML and LSE. So I know this is a completely subjective question but I just wanted to ask how difficult the LNAT is. Of course it differs from person to person and year to year, but I just wanted to get as many opinions as possible to make a general consensus. Is there a set pass rate that I need to score in the LNAT to get into these unis? Also, any tips or advice would be highly appreciated. Thanks so much
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username3046368
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#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
Very difficult to be honest. People might say it's easy and good for them, but there's a reason it ranks in the top 12 hardest tests in the world (seriously I'll link the source). But, overall It depends on what mark you are trying to achieve. To get 35+ is extremely difficult. 30 is tough but still doable with good timings and technique. I got 4A* in my A Levels, yet only got 24 in my LNAT, because I personally dislike MCQ's and I didn't prepare enough. However, I still got a UCL offer and a KCL scholarship offer. (LSE doesn't require it).

Source: http://listovative.com/top-12-most-d...t-exams-world/
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bigeyeshijabi
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#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by PoliticsandP)
Very difficult to be honest. People might say it's easy and good for them, but there's a reason it ranks in the top 12 hardest tests in the world (seriously I'll link the source). But, overall It depends on what mark you are trying to achieve. To get 35+ is extremely difficult. 30 is tough but still doable with good timings and technique. I got 4A* in my A Levels, yet only got 24 in my LNAT, because I personally dislike MCQ's and I didn't prepare enough. However, I still got a UCL offer and a KCL scholarship offer. (LSE doesn't require it).

Source: http://listovative.com/top-12-most-d...t-exams-world/

Oh no I knew it would be difficult but I'm actually getting worried now. What would you say is the best way to prepare?
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username3046368
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#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by bigeyeshijabi)
Oh no I knew it would be difficult but I'm actually getting worried now. What would you say is the best way to prepare?
I wouldn't be worried. As I say I didn't prepare enough so if you prepare well you definitely could do very well. Practice papers are the best way to prepare for sure.
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wantodothebest
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#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
Dont worry!

My main advice would be - be focused. Its all about just relaxing in the test, focusing and timing yourself well.

Practice tests do help but I feel like I did loads and my score only improved by like4 marks. Its more of a 'you have it or dont' kind of test. You cant REALLY prep for it like you would for an A level exam - you dont revise, you just prep to get used to the format

Good luck!
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Arbitio LNAT
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#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by bigeyeshijabi)
Hi everyone! Im currently about to start Yr 13 and got 3 A's and a B in my AS results and want to study Law at either KCl, UCL, QML and LSE. So I know this is a completely subjective question but I just wanted to ask how difficult the LNAT is. Of course it differs from person to person and year to year, but I just wanted to get as many opinions as possible to make a general consensus. Is there a set pass rate that I need to score in the LNAT to get into these unis? Also, any tips or advice would be highly appreciated. Thanks so much
Difficulty of LNAT

It is certainly not an easy test. There is a significant time pressure, and the questions are usually with two answer options seemingly right, but one is better. It tests your verbal reasoning and critical thinking skills: you consider the evidence in the passages, what did the author mean, why did the author write something, what was argument, what were the facts/opinions etc.

The passages are on nuanced topics, some of them very accessible, others rather detailed (for example, some philosophical argument). I think the reading component is what people underestimate the most: concentrating for 95 minutes with a critical eye for detail and assumptions stretches anyone.

The average score is in the low 20s, and a score of 28 or above is really good. For example, for Oxford, average successful applicant got 29, and only a few people had 34 or above. UCL is quite keen on the essay component (I don't think KCL cares about the essay, unless borderline) and has an average score of 28 for successful candidates. This means that for competitive LNAT unis, a few points do make a difference. Most unis do no not have a cut-off score (except Nottingham which has about 25 based on previous years' data), but consider that most do not hold interviews. So LNAT is basically an important quantitative metric for unis.

Tips

I would just practice. Try to do as many questions under real exam conditions. At the same time, your preparation should be focused with analysis: what are the question types, what are the passages about, do you understand definitions such as fact/opinion/assertion/irony etc.

Don't forget about writing essays (preferably on a computer, just like the LNAT). I think anyone can come up with arguments on the questions that are usually served, but it is a whole different game to write something persuasive, with cogent reasoning, that maintains clear structure required of a succinct essay.

And small things matter - you can book your LNAT for an afternoon slot. I find that I always do worse in morning exams.

And I cannot stress this enough: don't stress If you prepare, you can go into the exam as if it's just another practice test. Everyone finds this exam difficult, and in many ways, the task is not that huge: you just have to get that extra few marks.
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bigeyeshijabi
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#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by Arbitio LNAT)
Difficulty of LNAT

It is certainly not an easy test. There is a significant time pressure, and the questions are usually with two answer options seemingly right, but one is better. It tests your verbal reasoning and critical thinking skills: you consider the evidence in the passages, what did the author mean, why did the author write something, what was argument, what were the facts/opinions etc.

The passages are on nuanced topics, some of them very accessible, others rather detailed (for example, some philosophical argument). I think the reading component is what people underestimate the most: concentrating for 95 minutes with a critical eye for detail and assumptions stretches anyone.

The average score is in the low 20s, and a score of 28 or above is really good. For example, for Oxford, average successful applicant got 29, and only a few people had 34 or above. UCL is quite keen on the essay component (I don't think KCL cares about the essay, unless borderline) and has an average score of 28 for successful candidates. This means that for competitive LNAT unis, a few points do make a difference. Most unis do no not have a cut-off score (except Nottingham which has about 25 based on previous years' data), but consider that most do not hold interviews. So LNAT is basically an important quantitative metric for unis.

Tips

I would just practice. Try to do as many questions under real exam conditions. At the same time, your preparation should be focused with analysis: what are the question types, what are the passages about, do you understand definitions such as fact/opinion/assertion/irony etc.

Don't forget about writing essays (preferably on a computer, just like the LNAT). I think anyone can come up with arguments on the questions that are usually served, but it is a whole different game to write something persuasive, with cogent reasoning, that maintains clear structure required of a succinct essay.

And small things matter - you can book your LNAT for an afternoon slot. I find that I always do worse in morning exams.

And I cannot stress this enough: don't stress If you prepare, you can go into the exam as if it's just another practice test. Everyone finds this exam difficult, and in many ways, the task is not that huge: you just have to get that extra few marks.
Thank you so much for all the advice! I'll defo try to stress less and prepare myself as much as possible
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MoTheCucumber
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#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
I would disagree with your claim that Nottingham has a cut-off score. I can't comment on last year, however, this year I scored the average mark (23) and received an offer (reduced, at that). Also, many others I have spoken to on my course received marks in the range of 19-28, so anyone worrying about applying to certain universities because of the perceived difficulty of the LNAT, don't be dissuaded. Other than that, great advice!
(Original post by Arbitio LNAT)
Difficulty of LNAT

It is certainly not an easy test. There is a significant time pressure, and the questions are usually with two answer options seemingly right, but one is better. It tests your verbal reasoning and critical thinking skills: you consider the evidence in the passages, what did the author mean, why did the author write something, what was argument, what were the facts/opinions etc.

The passages are on nuanced topics, some of them very accessible, others rather detailed (for example, some philosophical argument). I think the reading component is what people underestimate the most: concentrating for 95 minutes with a critical eye for detail and assumptions stretches anyone.

The average score is in the low 20s, and a score of 28 or above is really good. For example, for Oxford, average successful applicant got 29, and only a few people had 34 or above. UCL is quite keen on the essay component (I don't think KCL cares about the essay, unless borderline) and has an average score of 28 for successful candidates. This means that for competitive LNAT unis, a few points do make a difference. Most unis do no not have a cut-off score (except Nottingham which has about 25 based on previous years' data), but consider that most do not hold interviews. So LNAT is basically an important quantitative metric for unis.

Tips

I would just practice. Try to do as many questions under real exam conditions. At the same time, your preparation should be focused with analysis: what are the question types, what are the passages about, do you understand definitions such as fact/opinion/assertion/irony etc.

Don't forget about writing essays (preferably on a computer, just like the LNAT). I think anyone can come up with arguments on the questions that are usually served, but it is a whole different game to write something persuasive, with cogent reasoning, that maintains clear structure required of a succinct essay.

And small things matter - you can book your LNAT for an afternoon slot. I find that I always do worse in morning exams.

And I cannot stress this enough: don't stress If you prepare, you can go into the exam as if it's just another practice test. Everyone finds this exam difficult, and in many ways, the task is not that huge: you just have to get that extra few marks.
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salviakasana03
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#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
has anyone gotten a 42/42 before?
seems impossible 👀
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bhoot
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#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by username3046368)
Very difficult to be honest. People might say it's easy and good for them, but there's a reason it ranks in the top 12 hardest tests in the world (seriously I'll link the source). But, overall It depends on what mark you are trying to achieve. To get 35+ is extremely difficult. 30 is tough but still doable with good timings and technique. I got 4A* in my A Levels, yet only got 24 in my LNAT, because I personally dislike MCQ's and I didn't prepare enough. However, I still got a UCL offer and a KCL scholarship offer. (LSE doesn't require it).

Source: http://listovative.com/top-12-most-d...t-exams-world/
you dont need LNAT test to get into LSE??
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