commanderalevel
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
So my sixth form is apparently full for Physics, so I had no other choice but to do Biology in place of it. I'm also doing Chemistry and Math in place of it. My goal is to enter the space sector and do aeronautical and astronautical engineering specifically. I know many British universities require A level math and Phys8cs for entry. However, I've been thinking. My dad lives in Indiana in the USA, and I think I might do good moving with him over there after I finish a levels and go to Purdue University. I've consulted with them, and the American university (or college as they call it there) works differently for admissions. They certainly accept and recognise UK qualifications like GCSE and A level. However with them, they require GCSEs at the minimum because they deem it the equivalent of a U.S. high school diploma. When it comes to A levels , they say I can take whatever subjects I'd Like, and I can still do Aerospace as a major if I do Biology. This is because for them the A levels aren't an actual requirement but rather are like a bonus for which you can earn college credit. They say I could maybe earn credit for the Math A level.

My AS Biology teacher also said moving there us probably a better choice, because the UK doesn't have a very strongmy funded program for what I want to do. Sure we have the ESA, but still, the UK is not explicitly enthusiastic about going to Mars or the moon. It'd be nice if they did though. But eh.

What do you guys think?
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Maker
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#2
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#2
Britain has a lot of commercial aerospace companies, can you get a job in the US after doing your degree?
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commanderalevel
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#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by Maker)
Britain has a lot of commercial aerospace companies, can you get a job in the US after doing your degree?
My dad is a US citizen and he can sponsor me for a green card. I'm hoping to pursue a masters and go for the air force by going to officer training school and get commissioned as a second lieutenant.
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Helloworld_95
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#4
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#4
There are a few British unis which offer Aero without physics, e.g. Sheffield and I think Nottingham, but for Sheffield you have to do a 4 week course there before fresher's week.

As for US universities, be aware that you will be required to pay out of state fees as you haven't been a resident recently, which is going to work out to be a lot more expensive than the UK, and in general you'll have the time problem in that you can get a master's in the UK by the time you would've even finished your bachelor's in the US. Looking at Purdue's fees you would be paying about double for a bachelor's degree there compared to an integrated master's in the UK.

As far as I know, while US universities will often consider GCSEs to be on par with the US high school diploma, the large majority require you to complete the standard level of education in your country, which for the UK means A levels. This doesn't mean you can't get admitted without A level physics, but it's worth mentioning for completeness. They're also going to expect a high standard in your A level predictions, similar to an equivalent university in the UK so this is going to mean in the AAA-A*AA range.

When applying, you will need to put forward an application with very good SAT scores, ~750 in each section/subject for universities in Purdue's league. You may also be required to present an SAT score in physics in order to be admitted to the department/major, or take required classes, or take a low level physics class to get you to that level. (I think there's a couple of physics tests actually, and as aero is interdisciplinary you may need to present both, but I would ask on collegeboard as they would be better suited to answering these questions.) You'll also need to show a good set of extracurriculars, the US is a whole other ball game when it comes to this so read up and be prepared. Also applying to US universities in general is a pretty expensive task, I would put away about £700 for it.

Bear in mind that US universities are competition *****s so advertise that everyone has a chance of admission, don't allow them to encourage you too much.

As for the work, places like NASA are ultra competitive and aren't something you should rely on, you're also not really disadvantaged by having a UK education and then going for these kind of jobs, in fact I'll touch on this later. You also lose out on a lot of work life balance working in the US which you won't be able to appreciate now but once you've gone to uni you will realise its importance. Ambitious companies like SpaceX have an awful reputation for this thing to the point where they're considered training programs for other jobs where you do a year then get out as soon as possible.

My advice would be do your MEng in the UK at a uni which will let you in without maths, then apply for jobs and PhD programs in the US (or even MS programs), you end up with your timeline being shorter, and from what I've seen grads from the UK have quite an advantage for getting into US graduate school due to the thesis we do so you may have the opportunity to get into better universities.
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artful_lounger
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#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
Purdue is excellent for engineering in general, although I don't recall if they have a specific Aerospace programme. Embry-Riddle is also one of the better ones for Aerospace overall (and of course, MIT. CalTech is also arguably even better but doesn't offer an option in Aerospace, only a minor, so you would need to do some other option in EAS typically then continue to grad study in aerospace).

However beyond the above comments, you don't need a degree in aerospace engineering to work in the aeropsace sector. It's a fairly unusual option for undergraduate study (not so much as say, Nuclear Engineering, but definitely more than the core Mechanical/Civil/EE). Virtually every engineering discipline, from Mechanical to Chemical to EE can find work in aerospace due to the hugely interdisciplinary nature of the area.

Further, not having Physics in 6th Form, while normally limiting your options in engineering significantly, does not necessarily mean you won't be able to pursue a course in engineering at all. Besides Chemical and Materials engineering courses which may accept Chemistry/Maths (and FM, if possible - this is recommended for any engineering course), some courses don't require Physics explicitly (such as at Exeter) and there are many "Engineering with Foundation" courses which cover the necessary physics (and maths and other) content in the foundation year (such as at Loughborough, Manchester, and Southampton).
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commanderalevel
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#6
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by Helloworld_95)
There are a few British unis which offer Aero without physics, e.g. Sheffield and I think Nottingham, but for Sheffield you have to do a 4 week course there before fresher's week.

As for US universities, be aware that you will be required to pay out of state fees as you haven't been a resident recently, which is going to work out to be a lot more expensive than the UK, and in general you'll have the time problem in that you can get a master's in the UK by the time you would've even finished your bachelor's in the US. Looking at Purdue's fees you would be paying about double for a bachelor's degree there compared to an integrated master's in the UK.

As far as I know, while US universities will often consider GCSEs to be on par with the US high school diploma, the large majority require you to complete the standard level of education in your country, which for the UK means A levels. This doesn't mean you can't get admitted without A level physics, but it's worth mentioning for completeness. They're also going to expect a high standard in your A level predictions, similar to an equivalent university in the UK so this is going to mean in the AAA-A*AA range.

When applying, you will need to put forward an application with very good SAT scores, ~750 in each section/subject for universities in Purdue's league. You may also be required to present an SAT score in physics in order to be admitted to the department/major, or take required classes, or take a low level physics class to get you to that level. (I think there's a couple of physics tests actually, and as aero is interdisciplinary you may need to present both, but I would ask on collegeboard as they would be better suited to answering these questions.) You'll also need to show a good set of extracurriculars, the US is a whole other ball game when it comes to this so read up and be prepared. Also applying to US universities in general is a pretty expensive task, I would put away about £700 for it.

Bear in mind that US universities are competition *****s so advertise that everyone has a chance of admission, don't allow them to encourage you too much.

As for the work, places like NASA are ultra competitive and aren't something you should rely on, you're also not really disadvantaged by having a UK education and then going for these kind of jobs, in fact I'll touch on this later. You also lose out on a lot of work life balance working in the US which you won't be able to appreciate now but once you've gone to uni you will realise its importance. Ambitious companies like SpaceX have an awful reputation for this thing to the point where they're considered training programs for other jobs where you do a year then get out as soon as possible.

My advice would be do your MEng in the UK at a uni which will let you in without maths, then apply for jobs and PhD programs in the US (or even MS programs), you end up with your timeline being shorter, and from what I've seen grads from the UK have quite an advantage for getting into US graduate school due to the thesis we do so you may have the opportunity to get into better universities.
Hi! Thanks for your response. I contacted Purdue and they did say that when it comes to A levels (which I am currently studying in Bio, Chem and Math) I could do whatever subjects I Like, so I guess that solves the problem of me not having A level Physics. The only problem it causes is that I won't get college credit for it. I was thinking of taking an SAT Subject Tests in Physics and Math after my regular SAT (which I'm going to take in May).

As for the fees, my dad did say that he'd be willing to start sponsoring me for a green card right now. That means not too long from now I will have to officially move my belongings to his house in Indiana. I will receive my green card and my official address will be in Indiana, I'll basically be an Indiana resident. When I go to the UK to wrap up my A levels, I will only technically be here temporarily to do just That, and the US will be my official home. Even if Purdue rejects me, I'll still be going back there anyway, as my dad says he'll help me go through some options.

That being said, I'll meet a requirement to gain state financial aid and Federal financial aid. Assuming I'll have been an Indiana resident for the year prior to when classes start, I could be entitled to in state fees.

As for NASA, it is indeed my goal. Yeah, I am aware of the intensity. My initial career goal is to become a pilot with the USAF, as that's where many famous NASA names started anyway.

The main advantage of going to Purdue for me is because their system could overlook that I don't have A level Physics. They said I could still be considered for aero if the grades of the predicted a levels are good, SATs exceed the minimum and that I meet their coursework requirements.
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commanderalevel
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#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Purdue is excellent for engineering in general, although I don't recall if they have a specific Aerospace programme. Embry-Riddle is also one of the better ones for Aerospace overall (and of course, MIT. CalTech is also arguably even better but doesn't offer an option in Aerospace, only a minor, so you would need to do some other option in EAS typically then continue to grad study in aerospace).

However beyond the above comments, you don't need a degree in aerospace engineering to work in the aeropsace sector. It's a fairly unusual option for undergraduate study (not so much as say, Nuclear Engineering, but definitely more than the core Mechanical/Civil/EE). Virtually every engineering discipline, from Mechanical to Chemical to EE can find work in aerospace due to the hugely interdisciplinary nature of the area.

Further, not having Physics in 6th Form, while normally limiting your options in engineering significantly, does not necessarily mean you won't be able to pursue a course in engineering at all. Besides Chemical and Materials engineering courses which may accept Chemistry/Maths (and FM, if possible - this is recommended for any engineering course), some courses don't require Physics explicitly (such as at Exeter) and there are many "Engineering with Foundation" courses which cover the necessary physics (and maths and other) content in the foundation year (such as at Loughborough, Manchester, and Southampton).
They offer Aeronautics and Astronauts as a major according to their website, which is considered as part of the aerospace umbrella I believe. As for MIT or Caltech, they have acceptance rates of only about 7%. I'm not Einstein enough to get into those, lol
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artful_lounger
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#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by commanderalevel)
They offer Aeronautics and Astronauts as a major according to their website, which is considered as part of the aerospace umbrella I believe. As for MIT or Caltech, they have acceptance rates of only about 7%. I'm not Einstein enough to get into those, lol
Aero/Astro is just another term for Aerospace, although the former usually means they have some "astro" content whereas the latter doesn't necessarily.

I would suggest looking into some Engineering Foundation years in the UK before focusing too much on the US - even if your father is a US citizen, if you are not it can cause issues with funding. Even if you are, Purdue (and Embry-Riddle) are both private colleges and so very expensive to go to.

It's worth noting, it will take the same length of time to get a degree with a foundation year as in the US - since that foundation year content is normally covered in freshman year at college. Equally, you have the opportunitty to do an MEng virtually everywhere here, with SFE undergrad funding. In the US, doing the coterminal or 5th year masters option is normally less common, has more funding pressures, and is less well integrated into the overall curriculum.

As for working at NASA, it doesn't matter where you got your degree from - they care more about the fact you got one, and then what you do with it. In fact a degree from a good UK university in aerospace will be probably better than a token degree from a no-name state college in the US (Purdue would be roughly on par with, or slightly worse than, the aforementioned Southampton/Loughborough/Manchester - for engineering only. In other subjects it's strictly poorer, and it's more expensive no matter what).

Also bear in mind to work in senior positions at NASA you're normally required to be a US citizen, possible a US born citizen, due to DOD clearance requirements. Also while you can work at NASA not having gone to CalTech/MIT/similar, you would be of a similar intellectual calibre to be able to no matter where your degree was from...something to reflect on perhaps.
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commanderalevel
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#9
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Aero/Astro is just another term for Aerospace, although the former usually means they have some "astro" content whereas the latter doesn't necessarily.

I would suggest looking into some Engineering Foundation years in the UK before focusing too much on the US - even if your father is a US citizen, if you are not it can cause issues with funding. Even if you are, Purdue (and Embry-Riddle) are both private colleges and so very expensive to go to.

It's worth noting, it will take the same length of time to get a degree with a foundation year as in the US - since that foundation year content is normally covered in freshman year at college. Equally, you have the opportunitty to do an MEng virtually everywhere here, with SFE undergrad funding. In the US, doing the coterminal or 5th year masters option is normally less common, has more funding pressures, and is less well integrated into the overall curriculum.

As for working at NASA, it doesn't matter where you got your degree from - they care more about the fact you got one, and then what you do with it. In fact a degree from a good UK university in aerospace will be probably better than a token degree from a no-name state college in the US (Purdue would be roughly on par with, or slightly worse than, the aforementioned Southampton/Loughborough/Manchester - for engineering only. In other subjects it's strictly poorer, and it's more expensive no matter what).

Also bear in mind to work in senior positions at NASA you're normally required to be a US citizen, possible a US born citizen, due to DOD clearance requirements. Also while you can work at NASA not having gone to CalTech/MIT/similar, you would be of a similar intellectual calibre to be able to no matter where your degree was from...something to reflect on perhaps.
I could become a US Citizen through the N400 naturalization in 5 years of being a green card holder. This would be in the first or second year of my would-be graduate degree. Its after this that I plan to go onto to Officer training school in Alabama as I aim to become a pilot, so I'm not directly going for NASA. I want to be able to gain the citizenship in time for this because I would need to enter flight school before the age of 29 otherwise I cannot be a USAF pilot. If I completed a four or five year Meng in the UK, I wouldn't be able to go directly to Officer training school as I'd need to wait five years for citizenship, and by then I'll be in my 30s. (I'm 18 now)
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artful_lounger
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#10
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#10
(Original post by commanderalevel)
I could become a US Citizen through the N400 naturalization in 5 years of being a green card holder. This would be in the first or second year of my would-be graduate degree. Its after this that I plan to go onto to Officer training school in Alabama as I aim to become a pilot, so I'm not directly going for NASA. I want to be able to gain the citizenship in time for this because I would need to enter flight school before the age of 29 otherwise I cannot be a USAF pilot. If I completed a four or five year Meng in the UK, I wouldn't be able to go directly to Officer training school as I'd need to wait five years for citizenship, and by then I'll be in my 30s. (I'm 18 now)
There is a teeny flaw with that plan, which is actually getting a green card, which may be easier said than done.

Also I believe some posts also aren't open to naturalized citizens and only to citizens by birth anyway (similar to many MoD or diplomacy service related civil servant positions not being available to non-UK born citizens here).
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commanderalevel
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#11
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#11
(Original post by artful_lounger)
There is a teeny flaw with that plan, which is actually getting a green card, which may be easier said than done.

Also I believe some posts also aren't open to naturalized citizens and only to citizens by birth anyway (similar to many MoD or diplomacy service related civil servant positions not being available to non-UK born citizens here).
Many posts like say, air force pilot or astronaut require simply US citizenship. There were two British people who were naturalized US citizens and became NASA Astronauts (it was kinda funny seeing an American astronaut with a Yorkshire accent ).

If you want to be President of the United States, yeah you have to be natural born. But I don't want to be President, lol. I believe being the chief of NASA also requires being natural born but I don't really intend on being the administrator of NASA either.

Yeah, green cards are usually difficult but the process can be achieved fairly easily if you are sponsored through family. In fact family categories have unlimited visas, so it's take only up to a year to process. As well as that I'd need to go to London to the embassy for interviews and medical checkups and whatnot.
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