Biology VS Biomedical Science Watch

Jessie Davis
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What is the difference between a biology or human biology degree and a biomedical science degree? I am interested in science and particularly the way the human body works, however will a biomedical science degree be too clinical. I used to want to do medicine but changed my mind and wondered if anyone who does either degree can help me see which is best suited to me. Thank you!
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Sheek1234
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Heya! Biology is essentially a lot more broader than biomedicine as you study ecology and topics like evolution as well as the human body and can specialise in a particular area later on in your degree. Biomedical science has a key focus on the human body and disease.
For more in depth view on topics and units both subjects entail I would check out course content on some uni websites or ask on open days 💙
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Sheek1234
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Ah sorry I didn't read the last bit of your question! I don't have a degree in either but did apply for biomed initially and researched throughly!
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Jessie Davis
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(Original post by Sheek1234)
Heya! Biology is essentially a lot more broader than biomedicine as you study ecology and topics like evolution as well as the human body and can specialise in a particular area later on in your degree. Biomedical science has a key focus on the human body and disease.
For more in depth view on topics and units both subjects entail I would check out course content on some uni websites or ask on open days 💙
Hi, ok thats great thank you! so doing a biology degree allows me to specialise later on? my problem is, is that I am not a big fan of ecology and so I was thinking I should stick to the human bio side. do you think many unis will do a human biology degree? I know bath spa does. Thank you for your help
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Sheek1234
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(Original post by Jessie Davis)
Hi, ok thats great thank you! so doing a biology degree allows me to specialise later on? my problem is, is that I am not a big fan of ecology and so I was thinking I should stick to the human bio side. do you think many unis will do a human biology degree? I know bath spa does. Thank you for your help
Happy to help! 💙 If you prefer the human biology then I would go for that, I recall when I went for open days and the modules for all the bioscience degrees were being presented, biology offered the most choice in modules as you have a pretty broad first year and choose what you find interest in later on. If your looking for human biology specifically I would go on websites like which uni to find and compare unis that suit your preferred grades.
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Jessie Davis
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(Original post by Sheek1234)
Happy to help! 💙 If you prefer the human biology then I would go for that, I recall when I went for open days and the modules for all the bioscience degrees were being presented, biology offered the most choice in modules as you have a pretty broad first year and choose what you find interest in later on. If your looking for human biology specifically I would go on websites like which uni to find and compare unis that suit your preferred grades.
awww thats great! thank u so much
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Ruby1997
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I'm doing a biomedical degree - wish I did biology - it looks a lot more Versatile and you get a lot more choice on modules!
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artful_lounger
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Most Biomedical Science courses are non-clinical, and purely academic. There are some clinically oriented courses in this vein, but they are normally NHS sponsored programmes to prepare for the NHS BMS programme. If you want to learn about human biology a BMS course would be the normal approach. There isn't that much to human biology vs general mammalian biology if you disregard disease pathologies, or human sport/exercise science.

Alternately if you're more interested from a evolutionary point of view, Biological/Physical Anthropology (often only covered as part of an Archaeology course, as it's a rare degree on it's own - although it may be possible to specialise purely in this area in latter parts of an Archaeology degree, e.g. at Cambridge) or Human Sciences (which is only offered by three universities in the true sense, and by ~5 in name only). Human Sciences normally consider the evolution of humans as a species, and the development of modern human anatomy as a result of this. They usually balance the biological aspects with social/cultural considerations.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Most Biomedical Science courses are non-clinical, and purely academic. There are some clinically oriented courses in this vein, but they are normally NHS sponsored programmes to prepare for the NHS BMS programme. If you want to learn about human biology a BMS course would be the normal approach. There isn't that much to human biology vs general mammalian biology if you disregard disease pathologies, or human sport/exercise science.

Alternately if you're more interested from a evolutionary point of view, Biological/Physical Anthropology (often only covered as part of an Archaeology course, as it's a rare degree on it's own - although it may be possible to specialise purely in this area in latter parts of an Archaeology degree, e.g. at Cambridge) or Human Sciences (which is only offered by three universities in the true sense, and by ~5 in name only). Human Sciences normally consider the evolution of humans as a species, and the development of modern human anatomy as a result of this. They usually balance the biological aspects with social/cultural considerations.
These courses you speak of that are 'in the vein' have been in for about 7 years now. They don't prepare you for the 'BMS Programme' which is the PTP it is the PTP and results in you graduating as a Registered Biomedical Scientist.
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