mayhdd
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I'm just starting a level French along with Maths and Art.
I've heard that you should only take it if you get an A or above GCSE but I got a B, however it's something I enjoy and that I'm ready to work hard for.
Just looking for any tips really
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cherryblossoming
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Hiya, I'm doing French at A2 so don't hesitate to AMA

It's as hard as any other A-Level, don't let anyone put you off by saying it's impossibly hard bc it isn't. As long as you love the subject and want to do well in it, you will

As for tips I think the most important is grammar; it's not like GCSE where you'll get away with kinda knowing a certain tense but not really being able to construct it

Good luck with your studies!
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mayhdd
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(Original post by cherryblossoming)
Hiya, I'm doing French at A2 so don't hesitate to AMA

It's as hard as any other A-Level, don't let anyone put you off by saying it's impossibly hard bc it isn't. As long as you love the subject and want to do well in it, you will

As for tips I think the most important is grammar; it's not like GCSE where you'll get away with kinda knowing a certain tense but not really being able to construct it

Good luck with your studies!
Thank you!

How did you revise grammar? And what did you get at AS if you don't mind me asking?
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cherryblossoming
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(Original post by mayhdd)
Thank you!

How did you revise grammar? And what did you get at AS if you don't mind me asking?
I got A at AS

As for revising, I think it's more important that you 100% understand the tense or whatever grammar it is in the first place. Like you should know it inside out, and then just try your best to incorporate varied tenses and structures in your writing. Then as your teacher marks your work and corrects any mistakes you'll know your weaknesses and how to improve in the future
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mayhdd
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(Original post by cherryblossoming)
I got A at AS

As for revising, I think it's more important that you 100% understand the tense or whatever grammar it is in the first place. Like you should know it inside out, and then just try your best to incorporate varied tenses and structures in your writing. Then as your teacher marks your work and corrects any mistakes you'll know your weaknesses and how to improve in the future
That's amazing omg

And that actually helps a lot, thank you so much good luck in A2!
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cherryblossoming
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(Original post by mayhdd)
That's amazing omg

And that actually helps a lot, thank you so much good luck in A2!
Cheers - good luck at AS!
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R2497
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Definitely go for it! I did French, German and Spanish and loved them all. Verb tables are a great way to revise the grammar side! Try and use the subjunctive regularly too and know a few synonyms
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AnIndividual
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I've just finished my French A Level and loved it.

4 basic tips I would give are:

- Use impersonal expressions - in particular 'il s'agit de' and 'il faut' - In doing so you sound more French and 'il faut' can be turned into a subjunctive by making it 'il faut que'
- Don't obfuscate - from what I've seen and read, the best French is simple, and too many people when asked to write a response simply look for posh sounding expressions (my least favourite being 'la premiere constatation qui s'impose', etc.) because they believe it enhances the quality of their work - it doesn't and makes it sound too over the top and un-french. Moreover, try to not go overboard with the subjunctive. If used too often it makes you sound pompous. I basically limited myself to 'bien que', 'pour que' and 'il faut que'
- Read! Definitely read articles and try and get as much vocab as possible from them. Read books too if you like, but I found them either too long or too archaic for me to effectively revise vocab from them.
- Using participles - One thing I've noticed is that the French LOVE past participles which they use to 'strengthen' (I can't think of a better term) their nouns. For example you could say 'les decisions de la Cour Supreme' although I would prefer to say 'Les decisions PRISES PAR la Cour Supreme'. Both sentences work, but using participles in this way will gain you grammar points and also sounds more French.

Best of luck and feel free to ask any questions!
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mayhdd
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(Original post by R2497)
Definitely go for it! I did French, German and Spanish and loved them all. Verb tables are a great way to revise the grammar side! Try and use the subjunctive regularly too and know a few synonyms
Thank you!
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mayhdd
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(Original post by AnIndividual)
I've just finished my French A Level and loved it.

4 basic tips I would give are:

- Use impersonal expressions - in particular 'il s'agit de' and 'il faut' - In doing so you sound more French and 'il faut' can be turned into a subjunctive by making it 'il faut que'
- Don't obfuscate - from what I've seen and read, the best French is simple, and too many people when asked to write a response simply look for posh sounding expressions (my least favourite being 'la premiere constatation qui s'impose', etc.) because they believe it enhances the quality of their work - it doesn't and makes it sound too over the top and un-french. Moreover, try to not go overboard with the subjunctive. If used too often it makes you sound pompous. I basically limited myself to 'bien que', 'pour que' and 'il faut que'
- Read! Definitely read articles and try and get as much vocab as possible from them. Read books too if you like, but I found them either too long or too archaic for me to effectively revise vocab from them.
- Using participles - One thing I've noticed is that the French LOVE present participles which they use to 'strengthen' (I can't think of a better term) their nouns. For example you could say 'les decisions de la Cour Supreme' although I would prefer to say 'Les decisions PRISES PAR la Cour Supreme'. Both sentences work, but using participles in this way will gain you grammar points and also sounds more French.

Best of luck and feel free to ask any questions!
Wow thank you so much that was so helpful! ☺️
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Sammylou40
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Make sure you love the reading list!
Philosophy's a bugger in French if you can't stand it in English!
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username2571271
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(Original post by mayhdd)
I'm just starting a level French along with Maths and Art.
I've heard that you should only take it if you get an A or above GCSE but I got a B, however it's something I enjoy and that I'm ready to work hard for.
Just looking for any tips really
Hey, I took A-level French and will be studying French, Beginners Spanish and Translation (+Welsh) at uni this year so if you need any help/advice, please feel free to ask me and I will be very happy to help

I absolutely loved it and it was definitely my favourite A-level :yep:

My top tips would be:
- Work on your listening = Listening is the one thing that everyone struggles with but if you keep doing exercises and listening to TV/radio etc. you will become much better
- Make sure you know your tenses, they will improve your writing and may come up in grammar questions (I know the spec has changed so not sure)
- Try to use different expressions to show opinions (dont just use "a mon avis" in my opinion all the time)
- Get used to speaking = The speaking exam is different as you cant memorise stuff and say it, you need to be thinking of ideas as you speak
- But most importantly, enjoy it. If you do that, you should have no problem at all :thumbsup:

Hope this helps
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ICB
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I got a B in GCSE French, and then took a year out where I did no French at all. I still coped with the A-Level despite forgetting everything I knew before (although at first it was HARD). Now I'm going to study it at uni for revising tenses, languages online is your friend! http://www.languagesonline.org.uk/Hotpotatoes/Index.htm
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