krazykeys
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#61
Report 10 years ago
#61
(Original post by fizzicsfiend)
Hey, which university are you referring to?
University College, Oxford University
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fizzicsfiend
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#62
Report 10 years ago
#62
(Original post by krazykeys)
University College, Oxford University
Thanks
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krazykeys
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#63
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#63
(Original post by fizzicsfiend)
Thanks
why where are you applying?
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shaanyeatamin
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#64
Report 8 years ago
#64
I got the the following results....
Mathematics-A
Physics-A
Chemistry-A
Further Mathematics-B
Does anyone know what my IB point is????
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arrowhead
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#65
Report 8 years ago
#65
(Original post by shaanyeatamin)
I got the the following results....
Mathematics-A
Physics-A
Chemistry-A
Further Mathematics-B
Does anyone know what my IB point is????
Why would you care about the IB equivalent if you did A-Levels?

Anyway, according to the OP on the previous page an AAAB would amount to a 36 or 37 points in the IB.
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AcuteCaseOfAwesome
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#66
Report 8 years ago
#66
I've noticed that students who come from A level schools, who (atleast CLAIMED) that they had A's everywhere, were terrible IB students.
I am not sure if IB is just different, but A level students are not prepared at all. They usually have a very hard time.

I find the conversion system unfair and unrealistic.
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zaidmatalka
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#67
Report 7 years ago
#67
(Original post by TI-84)
I would say that 70% of the stuff done in HL is the same as SL...
but to achieve a 6 or a 7 in HL you need to master the other 30%
basically we do all the same topics as SL math.
for example, calculus, if there were 10 sub topics in Calculus which HL do, SL will do 7 of those sub-topics, but HL will do all 10.
also in the exam it will be 60% based on those 3 topics which are HL and 40% will be related to the other 7 topics.
no, although the subtopics have the same name the depth reached in each is much higher, it basicly saying that 12/4 in SL and 45/7 for HL same concept harder to do
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Eleniel
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#68
Report 6 years ago
#68
One of my friends got 45 points in IB and was rejected from Cambridge.

I mean... that's literally the highest you can get in IB.
It's really quite unfair.
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username941859
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#69
Report 6 years ago
#69
(Original post by Eleniel)
One of my friends got 45 points in IB and was rejected from Cambridge.

I mean... that's literally the highest you can get in IB.
It's really quite unfair.
With Cambridge it isn't just about score. It's about interview and admissions tests too.

It's when Durham reject 45ers without interview or test that shocks me.
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Eleniel
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#70
Report 6 years ago
#70
(Original post by Calllu-m)
With Cambridge it isn't just about score. It's about interview and admissions tests too.

It's when Durham reject 45ers without interview or test that shocks me.
Ah, fair enough. Durham rejects 45ers? That's harsh.
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Ben Kenobi
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#71
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#71
What is the point of all this? Universities have their own requirements which also depend on the subject combination.
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fairisle13
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#72
Report 6 years ago
#72
(Original post by Eleniel)
Ah, fair enough. Durham rejects 45ers? That's harsh.
Do you mean people who apply with 45 predicted?
Maybe they don't think the prediction is realistic or maybe they just don't like their personal statement. I applied for Durham when they wanted 38, was predicted 40 and got rejected, I didn't expect to get an offer just because I was predicted more than what they wanted.
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MrSupernova
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#73
Report 6 years ago
#73
IB students normally come from private schools, which gives them an advantage. Even if the IB to A-level conversion is a bit unfair, all it does is level the playing field slightly
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fairisle13
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#74
Report 6 years ago
#74
(Original post by MrSupernova)
IB students normally come from private schools, which gives them an advantage. Even if the IB to A-level conversion is a bit unfair, all it does is level the playing field slightly
That's not true. "In fact, nearly twice as many govenment-maintained schools as private ones offer the programme." (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...-question.html).
That assumption is made by a lot of people though. How would it 'level the playing field' in any way even if it were true though? You'd still have private school students doing A-levels applying too and it would be easier for them to get in than even those doing IB at the same school.
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DrT_Admissions
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#75
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#75
If we go by the HEFCE guidance for student number control then ABB would be equal to 34 points from the IB. Personally I would say that students at this level are usually somewhere around ABB-ABBB, they have slightly broader knowledge base than their A-Level counterparts but A-Levels are a little more specialised.

In my experience however, the performance of IB students when they get to university is very much dependent on their individual subject scores within the IB. For example, for a biosciences degree a student with a total IB score of 32 (but with a 6/7 in Biology/Chemistry) will often outperform a student with a higher total score.
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MrSupernova
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#76
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#76
(Original post by fairisle13)
That's not true. "In fact, nearly twice as many govenment-maintained schools as private ones offer the programme." (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...-question.html).
That assumption is made by a lot of people though. How would it 'level the playing field' in any way even if it were true though? You'd still have private school students doing A-levels applying too and it would be easier for them to get in than even those doing IB at the same school.
According to data from 3 years ago... I see the IB has done little to aid your research skills. And I didn't say it would level the playing field completely, only slightly (which is why I used the word slightly...) if a discrepancy even exists. It would only be easier for the A-level students at said school if it were certain that the IB was harder. I've just had a look at the syllabi for SL chemistry and maths - they don't seem to cover as much content as their AS equivalents, which balances out the fact you do more subjects imo.
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fairisle13
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#77
Report 6 years ago
#77
(Original post by MrSupernova)
According to data from 3 years ago... I see the IB has done little to aid your research skills. And I didn't say it would level the playing field completely, only slightly (which is why I used the word slightly...) if a discrepancy even exists. It would only be easier for the A-level students at said school if it were certain that the IB was harder. I've just had a look at the syllabi for SL chemistry and maths - they don't seem to cover as much content as their AS equivalents, which balances out the fact you do more subjects imo.
The IB has only gained more popularity among state schools in recent years. Data from 3 years ago is not relevant though, no? Glad that provided you with an opportunity for a dig at the IB though, as you so obviously have some issue with it.
It's not about one being harder than the other, it's about one being more demanding than the other, which I don't think is something anyone can really dispute. Saying one is 'harder' than the other is pointless, it's like getting into an argument on whether physics is harder than chemistry.
IMO the playing field won't be level until universities actually understand the IB. You try going to an open day or university fair and asking about the IB and they'll look at you slightly confused before flicking through the prospectus to show you their official entry requirements.
If you ask me the fairest thing to do would be to ask for 6s or 7s in the most relevant subjects (which should be HLs), and then a pass in everything else (4,4,4 + core point).
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MrSupernova
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#78
Report 6 years ago
#78
(Original post by fairisle13)
The IB has only gained more popularity among state schools in recent years. Data from 3 years ago is not relevant though, no? Glad that provided you with an opportunity for a dig at the IB though, as you so obviously have some issue with it.
It's not about one being harder than the other, it's about one being more demanding than the other, which I don't think is something anyone can really dispute. Saying one is 'harder' than the other is pointless, it's like getting into an argument on whether physics is harder than chemistry.
IMO the playing field won't be level until universities actually understand the IB. You try going to an open day or university fair and asking about the IB and they'll look at you slightly confused before flicking through the prospectus to show you their official entry requirements.
If you ask me the fairest thing to do would be to ask for 6s or 7s in the most relevant subjects (which should be HLs), and then a pass in everything else (4,4,4 + core point).
There's some data on the IB's website, but it won't open on my phone so I'll carry on... According to this article in the guardian (also 3 years old, I know ) "there are still more private school candidates than state". I don't have an issue with the IB; I have an issue with the superiority complex some IB students have. Take the student on here who couldn't believe that Cambridge had the indignity to reject a student even though his teachers predicted he/she would get 45, disregarding the fact that other factors are important and that this happens to plenty of kids predicted A*A*A*.

Harder and demanding mean essentialy the same thing, let's not waffle here... The IB's increase in breadth is balanced out by a corresponding decrease in depth. I guess the fact that A-levels are modular made them a bit easier, but now they're being abolished I really don't think there's a difference. Scottish students have the same problem with highers over English universities' lack of knowledge, what do you expect when it's such a minority qualification? I guess you've got a point with your proposal over making changes to IB offers, but it wouldn't address the fact that HL in a subject usually covers less material than the corresponding A-level
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Eleniel
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#79
Report 6 years ago
#79
(Original post by fairisle13)
Do you mean people who apply with 45 predicted?
Maybe they don't think the prediction is realistic or maybe they just don't like their personal statement. I applied for Durham when they wanted 38, was predicted 40 and got rejected, I didn't expect to get an offer just because I was predicted more than what they wanted.
I know two people who got 45 points in IB but they were both predicted 42. I don't think teachers usually predict 45 just because it is slightly unrealistic and maybe a bit too optimistic? That's what I would guess, anyway. But I wasn't actually talking about Durham, my friends never applied for it.
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Eleniel
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#80
Report 6 years ago
#80
(Original post by MrSupernova)
IB students normally come from private schools, which gives them an advantage. Even if the IB to A-level conversion is a bit unfair, all it does is level the playing field slightly
I actually did my IB at a state school, although I do agree with you that many IB students come from private schools.
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