username3158728
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I am applying to medicine soon, is there any advice for writing my personal statement? How long should it be? Is there any specific format that it should follow? Any help is very much appreciated
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C_Yap
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(Original post by georgelagalle)
I am applying to medicine soon, is there any advice for writing my personal statement? How long should it be? Is there any specific format that it should follow? Any help is very much appreciated
4000 characters or 47 lines (whatever comes first)

I'm not applying for medicine but I've already finished my final personal statement. Here is my advice:

Introduction: Concise few sentences as to what inspired you to study medicine. Avoid cliches and quotes.

3-4 paragraphs on super-curriculars, this can include:
- Any work experience you've done. Mention exactly what you did, what you learnt about it, and what it taught you about medicine. For example, you could say something basic like 'Seeing doctors work with radiologists and pathologists highlights the importance of teamwork in a healthcare environment - it taught me that medicine is multidisciplinary'
- Any volunteering such as in a care home. You could perhaps talk about a particular experience you had and try expand on it.
- Any charity events or community work and say what you learnt from it.
- Any wider reading you've done (would recommend mentioning at least one), and say what it taught you.
- Any competitions related to biology or chemistry (though this stuff can go on the reference instead)
- Any lectures or conferences you've been to and perhaps you could mention a recent topical issue that interests you.
- Any podcasts or societies related to medicine you've been a part of.
- Any independent projects like EPQ (5000 word essay and presentation on a chosen subject)

Always try link the end of paragraphs to why those experiences made you want to do medicine instead of something else

Then an extra-curricular paragraph:
- Mention what you did and what skills you gained from it

Then a conclusion.

Also, don't look at personal statement examples too much from the internet, as it could cloud the originality of your own personal statement.
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username3158728
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(Original post by Baaah)
4000 characters or 47 lines (whatever comes first)

I'm not applying for medicine but I've already finished my final personal statement. Here is my advice:

Introduction: Concise few sentences as to what inspired you to study medicine. Avoid cliches and quotes.

3-4 paragraphs on super-curriculars, this can include:
- Any work experience you've done. Mention exactly what you did, what you learnt about it, and what it taught you about medicine. For example, you could say something basic like 'Seeing doctors work with radiologists and pathologists highlights the importance of teamwork in a healthcare environment - it taught me that medicine is multidisciplinary'
- Any volunteering such as in a care home. You could perhaps talk about a particular experience you had and try expand on it.
- Any charity events or community work and say what you learnt from it.
- Any wider reading you've done (would recommend mentioning at least one), and say what it taught you.
- Any competitions related to biology or chemistry (though this stuff can go on the reference instead)
- Any lectures or conferences you've been to and perhaps you could mention a recent topical issue that interests you.
- Any podcasts or societies related to medicine you've been a part of.
- Any independent projects like EPQ (5000 word essay and presentation on a chosen subject)

Always try link the end of paragraphs to why those experiences made you want to do medicine instead of something else

Then an extra-curricular paragraph:
- Mention what you did and what skills you gained from it

Then a conclusion.

Also, don't look at personal statement examples too much from the internet, as it could cloud the originality of your own personal statement.
Thank you so much!!! This has really helped
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qam
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40% stuff you done 60% why you wanna do medicine
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username2703735
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Work experience is a big part of it. Not just listing what you have done that is of little to no benefit but explaining how this has changed your perspective, what you have learned and how it links to why medicine is for you. It isn't just a 9-5 career its a vocation and that passion which has driven you through the hard work of results and gaining work experience needs to show in your statement!
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HoldThisL
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I referenced a lot of academic books I've read and what I thought about the themes in them. I also talked about what I learned from my extended project.

As I write this I think that may not apply for medics.
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