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how much is reasonable to get from your parents Watch

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    So I'm off to uni next week. My maintenance loan leaves me with roughly 75 quid per week after paying for my accommodation. That's more than enough for food, and I am not going to go out (I'm still under 18 so I have no choice haha). My family is I would say middle class so I'm used to living on budget. so I think I could easily live on 75 quid. But my parents want to support me financially (they want me to focus on studying rather than a part time job etc). How much would be reasonable for them to give me every week? I don't want it to be too much as I think I should try to be as independent as possible but I understand that as my parents they do want to help me out. If your parents give you money, how much do you get?
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    (Original post by yaaaas)
    So I'm off to uni next week. My maintenance loan leaves me with roughly 75 quid per week after paying for my accommodation. That's more than enough for food, and I am not going to go out (I'm still under 18 so I have no choice haha). My family is I would say middle class so I'm used to living on budget. so I think I could easily live on 75 quid. But my parents want to support me financially (they want me to focus on studying rather than a part time job etc). How much would be reasonable for them to give me every week? I don't want it to be too much as I think I should try to be as independent as possible but I understand that as my parents they do want to help me out. If your parents give you money, how much do you get?
    £75 a week would keep you quite comfortable really, rather than asking what you should ask for, why not ask your parents what they are comfortable with? I had around that left and didn't need to work at all.
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    (Original post by yaaaas)
    So I'm off to uni next week. My maintenance loan leaves me with roughly 75 quid per week after paying for my accommodation. That's more than enough for food, and I am not going to go out (I'm still under 18 so I have no choice haha). My family is I would say middle class so I'm used to living on budget. so I think I could easily live on 75 quid. But my parents want to support me financially (they want me to focus on studying rather than a part time job etc). How much would be reasonable for them to give me every week? I don't want it to be too much as I think I should try to be as independent as possible but I understand that as my parents they do want to help me out. If your parents give you money, how much do you get?
    Tbh that's more than enough to live on. As long as you can afford a diet that contains meat and vegetables with that amount then you don't need outside assistance.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    £75 a week would keep you quite comfortable really, rather than asking what you should ask for, why not ask your parents what they are comfortable with? I had around that left and didn't need to work at all.

    because they ask me haha, they keep asking me how much I need and whatever I say I'll probably get, so I don't want to ask for too much
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    Tell them to keep the money they would want to give you every week on the side so you can use it for emergencies later.
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    (Original post by yaaaas)
    because they ask me haha, they keep asking me how much I need and whatever I say I'll probably get, so I don't want to ask for too much
    If you budgeted you wouldn't really need anything,you can feed yourself for £20 a week so you'd have £55 left for leisure. So perhaps they could get you things you need instead, i didn't want my family to give me any money as I really didnt need them to so mum bought me my first food shop and kitchen stuff instead.
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    You will need a deposit at the end of the academic year for your 2nd year house and you might have to pay rent over the summer before your 2nd year loan arrives. Perhaps ask them to put the deposit aside for you (probably £350-£450)?
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    I usually spend £20-£30 a week on food and if that's all you're spending it on I would suggest saving the rest for when you need it, for example living costs over a summer or perhaps buying a car when you graduate. It's never too early to start graduating!

    Even if you don't want to get a job, some voluntary work would go a great way to making you more employable once you do graduate. I also wouldn't pass up a chance to complete a placement if it's part of your course options.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    If you budgeted you wouldn't really need anything,you can feed yourself for £20 a week so you'd have £55 left for leisure. So perhaps they could get you things you need instead, i didn't want my family to give me any money as I really didnt need them to so mum bought me my first food shop and kitchen stuff instead.

    the reason why they want to give me money weekly is because I bought everything myself, my kitchen stuff and bedroom&bathroom stuff as well, my winter clothes, i bought most of the dry food as well. I wanted to buy as much as I could myself so they won't have to (I worked 5 months so I saved up a bit of money and felt like if I have the money, I shouldnt ask my parents to pay for my expenses) and I kind of feel like they now feel obligated to help me out because I paid for all these things. But anyway, thanks a lot, I think I'll see how much I need the first two-three weeks and then if I need more than 75 I'll ask for whatever I need. Or I could possibly ask them to save this money and give it to me for Christmas so then I'll have money for holiday or something, that'd be great as well.
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    (Original post by yaaaas)
    the reason why they want to give me money weekly is because I bought everything myself, my kitchen stuff and bedroom&bathroom stuff as well, my winter clothes, i bought most of the dry food as well. I wanted to buy as much as I could myself so they won't have to (I worked 5 months so I saved up a bit of money and felt like if I have the money, I shouldnt ask my parents to pay for my expenses) and I kind of feel like they now feel obligated to help me out because I paid for all these things. But anyway, thanks a lot, I think I'll see how much I need the first two-three weeks and then if I need more than 75 I'll ask for whatever I need. Or I could possibly ask them to save this money and give it to me for Christmas so then I'll have money for holiday or something, that'd be great as well.
    They shouldn't feel obligated but i guess that's part of letting it go and seeing you being independent financially, but having it as a gift if they really feel the need to could be a nice compromise.
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    Just tell them they don't have to give you anything, but anything they can realistically afford would be appreciated.
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    (Original post by Ishax)
    My sister needs help because her university is in London, after accommodation is paid she has a grand total of £0 to live off. Thankfully, she gets maintenance grant and works so she can build her CV. If she went a year later, no maintenance grant. Just loans.

    Yet here we have OP complaining about getting £75 a week, get a job and budget like everyone else does.

    I work regardless of my living accommodation.

    You just sound really bitter, I feel sorry for you
    I don't complain about £75 a week - i think that's a lot. Also, I worked during my last year of secondary school and both years of college as well as every summer. I just really want to focus on studying during my first year bc I want to go on a placement on my 2nd year and only the best 10 people out of the entire group can get the placement. So I'd rather focus on that rather than getting a random job in Tesco (nothing against it, I did it for a year, just saying that a professional placement will be more beneficial to me)
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    (Original post by Ishax)
    Then ask your parents for more money or just get a job.

    There's not much you can do.

    This thread isn't going to give you more money.

    you clearly don't get my point.
    I will ask my parents for money, the whole question is how much I'd need as I have no experience in living on my own. Other people have answered that 75 should be enough, therefore I'll see how it goes and then either ask for more or ask for this money for christmas/for my second year. I got my answer, no need to carry on with this stupid discussion.
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    Factor in the cost of any books you may need, but don't buy the reading list. There'll be 2nd years selling old text books in your department.
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    (Original post by yaaaas)
    So I'm off to uni next week. My maintenance loan leaves me with roughly 75 quid per week after paying for my accommodation. That's more than enough for food, and I am not going to go out (I'm still under 18 so I have no choice haha). My family is I would say middle class so I'm used to living on budget. so I think I could easily live on 75 quid. But my parents want to support me financially (they want me to focus on studying rather than a part time job etc). How much would be reasonable for them to give me every week? I don't want it to be too much as I think I should try to be as independent as possible but I understand that as my parents they do want to help me out. If your parents give you money, how much do you get?
    If you don't think you need money from your parents but they still want to help out then you have some options to play around with:

    They don't give you anything, but you let them know if you need something. That way they aren't on the hook for regular payments or anything and you can experience budgeting (stupid as it may sound it is a useful skill). They still get to help out if you need it though.

    They can set you up with anything you need like kitchen supplies and text books before you go. No regular payment stuff, but very helpful. Text books and stationary etc will also let them know they're helping with your studying which seems important to them.

    They can give you money for savings. If you are ever in need to can dip into it, but otherwise it goes towards something important in your future like a car or first aid training for your CV or a really awesome painting of a unicorn.

    They can pay for a specific thing. If you do this I would suggest that they pay you and you then pay it yourself because it gives you some credit history or whatever it's called. They could pay for your internet or gas bill or bus pass maybe.

    Those are just some ideas you can think about. It's all about what you and your parents are comfortable with and what your parents can reasonably afford.
    If they want to help you out and can afford to then great, they can give you whatever they want and you can always put it into savings.
    If they can't afford much then they can just be on stand-by with whatever they can and help you look for things and try to weasel old stuff off family members etc. They're still helping you and being supportive, but it doesn't break the bank.

    Hope that helps
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    (Original post by yaaaas)
    So I'm off to uni next week. My maintenance loan leaves me with roughly 75 quid per week after paying for my accommodation. That's more than enough for food, and I am not going to go out (I'm still under 18 so I have no choice haha). My family is I would say middle class so I'm used to living on budget. so I think I could easily live on 75 quid. But my parents want to support me financially (they want me to focus on studying rather than a part time job etc). How much would be reasonable for them to give me every week? I don't want it to be too much as I think I should try to be as independent as possible but I understand that as my parents they do want to help me out. If your parents give you money, how much do you get?
    If your family is middle class you aren't truly used to living on a budget and certainly not on a mere £75.

    1700/month plus extras and I have what remains of a fund (set up by my grandparents) to squander. Being independent is ovverrated, having a nice lifestyle underrated.
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    (Original post by usualsuspects)
    If your family is middle class you aren't truly used to living on a budget and certainly not on a mere £75.

    1700/month plus extras and I have what remains of a fund (set up by my grandparents) to squander. Being independent is ovverrated, having a nice lifestyle underrated.

    I love it when people think they know me and my situation better than I do. Trust me, I am used to living on budget. I grew up in Eastern Europe, living on my own from the age of 11, getting like £10 a week from my parents. Then I moved to live with my parents in England when I was 16, and we had £30-40 for the 3 of us to live on every week. Now it got better, but yes I do know what living on budget means.
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    (Original post by yaaaas)
    I love it when people think they know me and my situation better than I do. Trust me, I am used to living on budget. I grew up in Eastern Europe, living on my own from the age of 11, getting like £10 a week from my parents. Then I moved to live with my parents in England when I was 16, and we had £30-40 for the 3 of us to live on every week. Now it got better, but yes I do know what living on budget means.
    If you describe yourself as typical middle class (in financial-related discussions) then obviously people will be confused.
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    75 is plenty per week, even if you want to go out a bit... why not ask them to help out with other things e.g. mobile phone contract, deposits, keep some money aside for emergencies ro even put a bit in a savings account for a house deposit in the future...
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    75 is plenty per week, even if you want to go out a bit... why not ask them to help out with other things e.g. mobile phone contract, deposits, keep some money aside for emergencies ro even put a bit in a savings account for a house deposit in the future...
    I wouldn't describe 75 as plenty, especially if you go out...
 
 
 
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